An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

Which one is correct? Similarly, is "do good" correct?
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7answers
11k views

When did the word “so” begin to be used to start a sentence?

In the last few years, I've noticed a growing usage of the word "so" to begin a sentence, especially in the context of higher education. For example: Interviewer: "What is the nature of your ...
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1answer
597 views

What is “however” in this sentence referring to?

No definite mass is identified. However, for further evaluation of this patient given his symptoms, an MRI is recommended. In the above sentence, does the "however" refer back to looking for a ...
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2answers
2k views

What are the limitations on the “there + preposition” construction?

I use words such as thereof, thereupon, and thereafter relatively often, but I occasionally find myself wanting to use this construction with different prepositions. Most times it's therefor, which I ...
3
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1answer
23k views

Meaning of “yet” in “the best is yet to come”

And the best is yet to come. In the above sentence, to be to means "will", yet means "already". So, does the sentence mean the best has already come or that it will come?
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1answer
302 views

Question on usage on 'Rating Yourself'

Assuming you are the interviewer and would you ask the candidate: How would you rate yourself on the scale from 1 to 10? What would you rate yourself on the scale of 1 to 10? Which ...
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2answers
4k views

Is it acceptable to say “more [adjective]” when there is already a dedicated form making “more” unnecessary (e.g. “angrier” vs. “more angry”)?

For years, it irritated me that people kept using "more [adjective]" where there were already dedicated forms making "more" unnecessary. For example, people would say "more tight" than "tighter". I ...
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1answer
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2answers
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Is that an adverbial participle? Should there be a comma?

I found the following sentence: In part of my spare time, I work on fun projects. I am not sure as to whether there should be a comma. If it is there, then this obeys some rules, for example on ...
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4answers
8k views

What is the difference between “truthfully” and “honestly”?

These are different words, and their usage (context) differs substantially. How would you define them or explain the difference (if you believe there is one)?
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1answer
20k views

What is the difference between “particularly” and “in particular”?

Is there any difference between particularly and in particular? When should I use each one of them?
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3answers
2k views

Is “more poorly” an appropriate phrase?

Today I described someone as being trained to react "more poorly" to a given situation. Her current reaction is poor. It is becoming more poor. So she reacts more poorly. Is this correct? It sounds ...
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3answers
1k views

“Just” vs “already”: which one is sooner?

Which one is sooner or closer to now? I've just called him. I've already called him.
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2answers
507 views

What is the word “who”?

Is the word "who" an adverb? If not, what is it? If it is an adverb, what type of adverb is it?
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5answers
2k views

What are the historical processes of preposition coining in English?

RegDwight's excellent answer showing the historical usage of despite got me thinking about the processes by which new prepositions are coined. Prepositions are generally considered a closed class, and ...
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7answers
18k views

What is the difference between “probably” and “possibly”? [closed]

Recently I saw the movie "Pursuit of Happyness", which is actually quite good, and I noticed the actor (Will Smith) asking the difference between probably and possibly to his son. So I would like to ...
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1answer
15k views

When do we use “rarely, hardly, seldom”?

I'd like to know when should we use "rarely" and "hardly" and "seldom". Can we use these adverbs in the same situation? Or do we need to follow some criteria for using those different adverbs?
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2answers
2k views

Position of the adverb “of course”

...which is of course zero. ...which of course is zero. Which one is preferred?
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3answers
2k views

“Hard” vs. “hardly”

I have always found the pronounced distinction in meaning between "studying hard" and "hardly studying" a bit amusing. What is the origin of the word hardly? How is it etymologically connected to ...
3
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1answer
161 views

“not meant merely to” vs “not merely meant to”

I don't know which of the two is more correct: This site is not meant merely to determine the popularity of specific tools. This site is not merely meant to determine the popularity of ...
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3answers
912 views

different usage of the word “only”

What is the difference between the following sentences? Basically, I would like to understand how the meaning changes with the usage of only in each of them. He only speaks English. He speaks only ...
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7answers
3k views

How common is “thrice”?

Our proofreader, a native speaker of American English, just won't let me use this word. Every single time I try to sneak it onto one of our sites, she replaces it with three times. Now, I do realize ...
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3answers
12k views

Is “caught you unawares” correct?

I read a book and came across "caught you unawares". I kept thinking it's supposed to be "caught you unaware". Is this an acceptable form or was that a typo or something?
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4answers
11k views

Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
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3answers
8k views

“currently not” or “not currently”

What's the correct order: Lessons are not currently being offered. or Lessons are currently not being offered.
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3answers
9k views

Place of “often” in the sentence

My question is simple. Is the following sentence correct? They don't watch TV often. My English teacher has told me that the only correct option is: They don't often watch TV. Is she ...
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2answers
3k views

What's the difference between “hence” and “thus”?

Can anyone explain the difference between hence and thus and when should we use one and not the other?
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6answers
20k views

“Like something more” or “like something better”

When people like something more than something else, it's common for me to hear them say they like it better than something else. Is this proper English? I've always thought the word more fits better, ...
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4answers
3k views

“Just” versus “simply”

To which extent is just interchangeable with simply, as in the example? It's becoming more than just annoying. It's becoming more than simply annoying. Is just synonym of simply in just any ...
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1answer
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Comparative and superlative adverbs?

I'm a native speaker of English, and I don't know how many times I've wanted to say "happilier" instead of "more happily", or "happiliest" instead of "most happily". Is there any record of such ...
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2answers
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Is there a comparative form of “well”?

Is there a word that means "more well", in the same way that "better" means "more good"? In common parlance most people just use "better" for this purpose, but this seems incorrect and is a nagging ...
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2answers
480 views

Is “dissatisfactorily” the correct adverb for not satisfying?

I want to express something like this: She had asked him why he had done it, but he had replied dissatisfactorily; he said that he didn't know. I also thought, maybe "dissatisfyingly?" I'd like ...
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2answers
2k views

Usage of 'only' with a verb

They only stamp academic documents versus they stamp academic document only: which one is correct and what are the implications of the non-correct form? (Context: university office that does other ...
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3answers
454 views

“In almost” vs “Almost in”

Which of the following is correct? In almost all cases, ... Almost in all cases, ...
29
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4answers
2k views

When should “farther” and “further” be used?

I know I learned the difference between the usage of farther and further in school, but I can never remember where each one should be used. Can someone help me out here?
3
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1answer
233 views

Is “plantingly” an adverb?

Is plantingly an adverb form of plant? Can you give me a example sentence? Edit: This use of plantingly came from the following quote: Firstly I [would like] to thank you for taking the time from ...
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3answers
18k views

“Can easily be” vs. “can be easily” — what's the difference?

I'm wondering what the difference is between: It can easily be obtained. It can be easily obtained. Also, what's the preferred way to write it? If there is any... I googled for both ...
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2answers
1k views

Which one is grammatically correct? Why?

I've a quick question about grammar within a sentence. I'd also like to know why it is like that if someone could provide an answer. Which one is correct? Along with fishing, I enjoy ...
5
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3answers
1k views

“He was playing when he fell” or “he fell when he was playing”?

Which one is correct? He fell down when he was playing in the field. He was playing in the field when he fell down. Why?
12
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1answer
23k views

Forward vs Forwards [closed]

As an adverb, what is the difference between forward and forwards?
9
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4answers
14k views

Is there any difference between 'often' and 'frequently'?

Do both mean exactly the same or do they have slightly different meanings?
7
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5answers
3k views

Using the word 'Only'

I am confused about using the word only. I often hear it being used in many contexts that sound wrong to me - but I'm not sure if it's me or them. Let me give some examples: A: Where were you ...
5
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1answer
3k views

Proper representation of “vice versa”?

How should I properly use the word vice versa in writing? Is that even the correct spelling?
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3answers
4k views

Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?

Why do we use up as adverbs for verbs? For example, 'wake up', 'throw up', etc.
9
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3answers
3k views

“Backward” versus “backwards” — is there any difference?

The dictionaries I've looked in don't distinguish between these two words, backward and backwards (at least when used as adverbs). Is there some real historical, grammatical or regional difference ...
12
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1answer
2k views

What's the correct usage of “hopefully”?

I said, "Hopefully, I will get better" to a friend and he said that I was using it incorrectly, stating that hopefully is an adverb meaning "full of hope" that modifies a verb. It sounds right, but ...
7
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4answers
895 views

How can I learn to get collocations right?

I read an article about collocation which includes an example: We can say highly sophisticated, and we can say extremely happy. highly happy and extremely sophisticated would be wrong. How can I ...
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10answers
133k views

Is “fastly” a correct word?

Slow has the adverb slowly. I tend to use fastly as the adverb for fast. However, it is underlined in most spell checkers I use, which makes me wonder about the existence of this word. Is fastly a ...
4
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2answers
5k views

When should you use “then” and when “than”?

As far as I know, then is used in a conjunction and in time-related sentences; than in all other cases. I believe that these are correct: Because I'm older than she, I should be the first chosen; I ...
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5answers
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“Irregardless” vs. “irrespective”

Why is irrespective considered a proper word but irregardless is not?