An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
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1answer
200 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
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29 views

Difference between the two sentences? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” I got confused between these two centences: I answered only four questions in my exam. I only answered four questions in my exam. ...
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3answers
1k views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
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1answer
3k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
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2answers
20k views

“I did it by myself” vs “I did it myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Myself vs by myself "I did it by myself" and "I did it myself"; what's the exact and subtle difference between the two?
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6answers
480 views

Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”

Which one is correct: "personal basis" or "individual basis"? I want to use it in a formal letter. I want to say: "I don't know Mr. X on a personal basis (or individual basis) and I have not had an ...
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1answer
1k views

Why does the word “inadvertently” mean “not knowingly”?

The root is advertently. That means “knowingly”. Fair enough. The root of advertently is advertent. That means “attention”. Hmmm … quite close. The root of advertent is advert, which means ...
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1answer
1k views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
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5answers
887 views

“Will shortly appear automatically” — what is the correct order of words in this fragment?

I want to say that an answer will appear shortly, and automatically, on the screen. I'm not sure whether the correct sentence is: The answer will shortly appear automatically. or maybe: The ...
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2answers
123 views

“The Cry of Jousts of King Richard II” — a problem with translation

I'm trying to translate this text to Polish and everything seems pretty clear to me, apart from the usage of the words "within" and "without". I presume it's some kind of technical vocabulary ...
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1answer
763 views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
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Is it possible to say ' your choice *for* something' when you mean 'your choice *of* something'?

I'm correcting a document and several people that co-wrote it seem to agree that 'my choice for' seems to be synonymous to 'my choice of', in the signification of me having chosen something and ...
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1answer
260 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
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2answers
220 views

“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
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3answers
1k views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
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1answer
381 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
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2answers
5k views

Place of an adverb in the passive present perfect progressive

I was wondering where an adverb should (or could) be placed in the passive present perfect progressive in English. I have been being carefully tickled. OR I have been carefully being ...
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5answers
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Is it correct to say “I kindly request you to…”?

Isn't kindness already implied when you say "I request you to..."? When I say "I humbly request you to...", the word humbly helps me to label the state of my behavior during the request. On the ...
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4answers
980 views

Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition ...
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3answers
1k views

What does the title “Whose line is it anyway?” mean?

Whose line is it anyway? is a comedy show in which participants are given a theme and they are supposed to come up with an act according to the theme given to them. According to Oxford Dictionary, ...
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1answer
180 views

Is this adjective or adverbial?

When are you getting the train back to Adelaide? Is the phrase back to Adelaide an adjective phrase that modifies the train or adverbial to are getting?
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4answers
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In the sentence “My house is down the street”, which word does the adverb “down” modify?

My house is down the street. Does the adverb down modify is, or street?
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5answers
5k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
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5answers
723 views

Placement of 'Little'

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 'little' as an adverb could mean: not much; only slightly Is there a preference among these sentences? He little helped his ...
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2answers
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“Fairly quick” vs. “fairly quickly” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”? If I were to write a sentence like: I completed the task fairly quickly. Is it correct, or would fairly quick be ...
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Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
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1answer
103 views

Is it normal to use ‘the second’ without a preposition in expressing ‘as soon as” or ‘no later than’?

I saw the following sentence in Time magazine’s (December 3) article titled “Betraying physical book: A book lover’s e-dilemma: “When electronic books first came out, I embraced them ...
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2answers
548 views

Where to place the word “easily”? [closed]

Where should I place the word easily — before or after edit and share your bookmarks? Do you want to edit and share your bookmarks easily? or Do you want to easily edit and share your ...
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1answer
130 views

How to say “A has X, and B has X” in a single clause

How can we say Mike has an apple, and Jane has an apple in a single clause? Can I say Both Mike and Jane have an apple or Mike and Jane each have an apple? They sound fine to me but ...
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3answers
8k views

“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
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3answers
3k views

Does “more or less” mean “almost”? [closed]

I checked out its meaning on the web and the common one I have found is "speaking imprecisely", but instinctively I thought it would be like "almost", for example: The task assigned is more or ...
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4answers
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What is the adverbial form of “communicational”?

I tried communicationally, but the Free Dictionary doesn’t find it to be a word. What I am trying to express is that someone is communicationally challenged, basically meaning they can’t communicate ...
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“I have been keeping ignoring you.”

Does this make any sense? I have been keeping ignoring you. Besides that it sounds awkward, my Chinese buddy who knows more grammar rules than I care to list said that the phrase is ...
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2answers
4k views

How should I reply to “Dude, are you there?”

Let's say I am having a telephone conference with rest of the team, and somebody asks me "Dude, are you there?" How should I reply? Yes, dude, I am there. or Yes, I am here? It is ...
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5answers
527 views

The use of “real” in the following cases [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Real quick question If you listen real close... Can you swing by real quick... Sentences like the above two are what I often hear in daily life. If I didn't ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Is this 'off' also an adverb?

In this example sentence: He needs more time off duty for relaxation and rest. the Longman dictionary says that off in the given example is an adverb. If the sentence was: "He needs more ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “best” an adverb?

In the sentence below, is best an adverb? If so, what does it modify, left or are? We’re best left alone.
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3answers
302 views

Can adverbs of high/increasing speed be applied to not doing something?

There was some chat earlier about adverbs. We were trying to demonstrate that maybe is an adverb. Reg did this deftly by replacing maybe with other adverbs and then a noun, to show that the noun ...
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5answers
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“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
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3answers
16k views

'of yet' and 'as of yet'

Can ‘of yet’ be used with the same meaning of ‘as of yet’? For example: Most importantly, he’s found footprints of dinosaurs that we haven’t found bones of yet. Does this mean the same thing as ...
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1answer
191 views

Is ‘there’ being treated as an object (noun)? [closed]

The word "there" in this sentence doesn't seem to be necessary. But if it is there, what exactly is it? A noun? An adverb? See there where the willow bends over the brook.
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1answer
362 views

Adverb of “gullible” [closed]

What is the adverb form of gullible? I tried using gullibly but it apparently isn't a word. Is it one of those adjectives that simply don't have an adequate adverb?
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5answers
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“Overseas” vs. “abroad”

I'm a native speaker of Inland Northern American English. My intuition tells me that the word "abroad" is unremarkable, especially in collocations like "study abroad". However, I've been ...
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1answer
6k views

“You should have also named” vs. “you should also have named”

Out of the two sentences, which one is correct? You should have also named it the Daily prophet. You should also have named it the Daily prophet. My guess is it's the first one.
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6answers
13k views

“Hardly” vs. “barely”

I'm from Germany and in German both translate to the same word (kaum). I'd like to know the difference between these two words, hardly and barely.
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2answers
360 views

Single word for “working without details” [closed]

I'm looking for one word that expresses lack of information, lack of knowledge and lack of guidance. The word is an adverb. It could be used in a sentence like so: He was working on a project ...
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3answers
2k views

is “purposely” an actual word? [closed]

I grew up in Malaysia and Singapore, and it's taken me a long time to dissect my vocabulary into "local slang, incomprehensible/incorrect elsewhere" and "proper English". 'Purposely' is one of those ...
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3answers
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More grammatically correct: “anything but” or “anything except”?

Could you tell me which of these phrases is grammatically correct — "anything but" or "anything except"? If the use depends on context, what are the instances when each must be preferred?