An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Usage of “already” and “yet”

I want to know the difference between already and yet in this example: I was surprised that they had __ to decide what to do. My answer on this question was already and my teacher marked it as ...
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“Absolute” or “absolutely”?

This question is related to programming, but this seemed a better place to post it than Stack Overflow. To style HTML pages, we frequently deal with positioning, and two common values for the CSS ...
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Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the below over others? a) Get hold of, b) Get ahold of, c) Get a hold of
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What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
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“Weekdays” used as an adverb

I found a sentence in Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The bookstore opens weekdays from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. . How do we understand the structure of ...
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Is “now” grammatical in “Have you now spoken to him?”?

Have you now spoken to him? I really heard that from someone.
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“Without success” vs. “unsuccessfully”

Is the phrase below correct? I have tried to contact the customer without success. Isn't it "I have tried to contact the customer unsuccessfully"?
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3answers
3k views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
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2answers
426 views

Why “buy things secondhand,“ not “buy secondhand things”?

I saw the word ‘secondhand’ come after ‘things’ in the lead copy of July 17 Time magazine’s article, titled “10 Things You Should Be Buying Used”, as follows. Buying things secondhand can save a ...
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“I remember the day where” vs. “I remember the day when”

What is the difference between "I remember the day where..." and "I remember the day when..."? I think both are used in both written and spoken English. Can we say that "when" makes more sense when ...
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2answers
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Is “ultimated” a word? [closed]

Is "ultimated" a valid word? For example: Range requests were originally proposed by Ari Luotonen and John Franks, using an extension to the URL syntax instead of a separate header field. ...
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1answer
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“along” in “the wolf passed something along to me”

Here is a quote by Jack Nicolson from the movie "Wolf": Since it happened I feel as though the wolf passed something along to me. I wonder why is along needed in that sentence? What difference ...
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259 views

Placement of “just” in “we just need minified and concatenated files” [closed]

I was talking to my client. I wanted to convey that "we need the minified type of files and the concatenated type of files; nothing other than that". I quickly wrote this: we just need minified ...
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“Above”/“below” before/after a noun

I have seen sentences similar to the following: (1) See the reference above. (2) See the reference below. And, (3) See the above reference. But not, (4) See the below reference. ...
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Which is more common - 'the most' or 'most'?

A thing I have never had the time to look more closely into. But I find both variants: What I love most is ... or What I love the most is ... I think the more common form is 'the most', ...
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How do you tell if synonyms of “almost” default to meaning “less than”?

Having just had a chat with Em1, I noticed that some words or phrases that mean almost will mean less than when used alone, and other synonyms will mean greater than. For example, nearly and close to ...
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Can adverbs be also direct objects?

"The irate customer asked for the chef." The irate customer asked something. (Noun phrase?) Since you can fill in something in place of 'for the chef,' does that mean it is a direct object and an ...
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Anyone and everyone - correct usage?

I'm just wondering whether both sentences would be correct: I look into the eyes of anyone who looks at me. I look into the eyes of everyone who looks at me. Would it be correct to ...
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Real quick question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “real” be used as an adverb to describe an adjective? Let me just ask you something real quick. Is my previous sentence wrong? Must the real part be "really"? Some ...
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What's the difference between “technically” and “technologically”? [closed]

What's the difference between technically and technologically? Can you give example sentences which clearly show the difference?
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Is “leisurely” still acceptable as an adverb?

I am used to seeing "leisurely" as an adjective exclusively, as in "walking at a leisurely pace." But today I read it used as an adverb in a New York Times review of "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Killer." ...
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2answers
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“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
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4answers
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'too' vs. 'so' in the subjunctive?

A colleague of mine just asked me about the sentence: If the book were not so expensive, I would buy it. She wanted to know why too was not a worthy substitute. I explained to her about the ...
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963 views

“Still” versus “Yet”

In the following sentence, is using of yet correct? Inserts settlement in a duty that needs it, in the most suitable yet available place. It seems to me that I must use still instead of yet but ...
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1answer
421 views

“have to be moved” or “must be moved” or “must move”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I have to” vs. “I must” Which of these is correct? The camera have to be moved sideways instead of rotate to track the scene. or The ...
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6answers
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“Sure I am not” — is that valid English?

Consider this conversation: — Iceland has more than 200 rainy days per year. — Are you sure? — No, I am not sure. Is it valid or wrong English to say, — No, sure I am not. ...in the ...
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Adverb form of “sustainable”

I'm translating a sentence to English, and want to use the phrase: All material is produced sustainably. But my spell-check doesn't like the word sustainably, so I looked it up, and have found ...
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When to use “generally”, “usually”, or “normally”

Generally speaking what are the usually accepted usage scenarios for the above mentioned words in a normally occurring English vernacular? In short, what are the rules/guidelines for using generally, ...
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1answer
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“Unequivocably” vs. “unequivocally”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in a news article titled “SCIENCE WATCH; PROGRESS IN AIDS DISPUTE” in The New York Times (March 10, 1987). Dr. Robert Gallo at the cancer ...
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2answers
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Is this correct: “Of [something] I have but none”?

This might be a pretty weird question, given that I'm using awkward grammar. Take into account that I'm trying to play with the language. The question is, would the following be correct? Of milk ...
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2answers
971 views

Should I say “domesticable” or “domesticatable”? [closed]

What should I say to sound better, "domesticable" or "domesticatable"?
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3answers
8k views

“Feel like at home”

Feel like at home. Is it correct or must it be "feel at home"? It is in a Euro 2012 commercial, however some experts say it's not correct.
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618 views

Is “even” a choice in this sentence?

I would appreciate your help. He is not strong at all. He would not even lift me. I would like to express that he would not even lift me, let alone heavier stuff.
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Adjective & Adverbial forms of “Conspiracy” [closed]

I tried looking up its synonyms (plot, scheme) and then their adjectives, but they didn't quite cut it. Any word that can be used as its adjective and adverb? The place that I would like to use it ...
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Position of 'also'

What is the correct position of the word 'also'? I would like to also talk about ... I would also like to talk about ...
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1answer
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“By now” vs “now”

The case is closed by now. The case is closed now. What exactly is the difference between the two?
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995 views

The position of 'last' in sentences

My post on another site has prompted me to ask this question. What is the rule of using 'last' in a sentence? For instance: When did you revise this rule last? When did you last revise this ...
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3answers
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Is 'but rather' considered grammatically correct?

Is this comment that I made here grammatically correct? In Latin, when a group of males and females is combined, the neutral plural form is not used, but rather the masculine is.
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Is it wrong to use “never” for a specific time period?

I usually come late to the daily scrum meetings (but I do compensate, by working late!). For the last 6 working days, I have been coming on time, or even slightly earlier. At lunch, I told my ...
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2answers
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Is it grammatically correct to add “anyway” at the end of this sentence? [closed]

This is a sentence from a short story I'm writing: "It's all the same to me, because when it comes to our deepest fears and insecurities, we are all alone." I'm not very sure if this is more ...
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Is “relatively big compared to” redundant?

If I say something like He is big compared to the other guy. He is relatively big compared to the other guy. is the adverb relatively wrong because of redundancy?
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“Eventually” vs. “finally”

What is the difference between finally and eventually? He eventually escaped and made his way back to England. He finally escaped and made his way back to England.
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“A bit” vs. “a little bit” vs. “a little”

Is there a difference between a bit, a little bit and a little in the following context? He is a little bit angry. He is a little angry. He is a bit angry. Or do these sentences mean the ...
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2answers
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How to combine “a book about X” with “people are interested in how X works”? [closed]

I would like to know how to correctly combine the sentence 1. with the sentence 2. People are interested in how these algorithms work. I am writing a book about algorithms... [here I need to ...
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1answer
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“ 'Such' amount” or “ 'such an' amount”?

Is there any difference between them!? If you google both: 1 and 2, the amount of retrieved results are very similar. I'd like to know if there's any (grammar) rule that makes it clear when to use an ...
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2answers
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Is “all total” grammatically correct?

We have three apples all total. All total, we have 75 bananas. How many cucumbers do we have all total? I have heard many sentences like this. I always wonder, is this grammatically ...
8
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2answers
11k views

Can “so” and “very” be used together?

Is it correct to use so and very together in a single sentence? For example: You are so very funny. Is it grammatically correct or not?
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2answers
562 views

“New diagnosed” vs. “newly diagnosed” [closed]

Which one of the following is correct to use? New diagnosed cases. Newly diagnosed cases.
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Use of “ever” instead of “more and more” [closed]

I wonder if I can use "ever" in place of "more and more". For example, do the following two sentences have the same meaning? Software is getting more and more complex. Software is getting ...
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“Often” and “oftentimes”

Is there any difference between the two terms 'often' and 'oftentimes'? They seem to be used interchangeably but is one more appropriate in certain situations than others? Is 'oftentimes' an older ...