An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Clarifying the usage of “hella”

The word hella has spread from the Southern California dialect to the point where most varieties of American English speaker (such as me in the Midwest) know that it exists and hear it used. I always ...
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10answers
569 views

Is there an adverb for “simplified”?

This is what I'm trying to express [Foo] can be simplifiedly characterised as [bar]. However I am unable to find references for such as word as simplifiedly. What I want to say is that the ...
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981 views

Adjective or adverb describing promotion of self or group one belongs to

Is there an adjective or adverb depicting self-promotion (or promotion of a group one belongs to)? I am thinking of something that has a somewhat negative connotation, in the spirit of phrases ...
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418 views

“Are you sure sure” — is this repetition grammatically correct?

A typical conversation among members of my age demographic could go like this: Person 1: Did you know that x > y?!? Person 2: Are you sure? Person 1: Yeah, I'm sure. Person 2: Are ...
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Which is correct: “I bought it online/offline”

On several occasions, someone has asked me where I purchased my shirt and I replied with "I bought it offline." It didn't sound right to me. My brain thought that I bought it 'off' of something ...
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Which one is correct “You heard it correct” or “You heard it correctly”?

Which one is correct? You heard it correct or You heard it correctly Does the same apply to read it correct[ly]?
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735 views

Where should I place the adverb?

Where should I place the adverb? Potentially, it could be moved back to where it was. It could be potentially moved back to where it was. It could potentially be moved back to where it was. ...
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Is “I'll when” proper form? [closed]

A friend of mine keeps using a contraction like this and I keep correcting him by asking "I'll what?". He doesn't get it though, and no matter how much I try to explain it doesn't seem to sink in. ...
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‘Not as simply’ versus ‘not as simple’

In this Stack Overflow answer, an editor changed my sentence: Not as simply as that, unfortunately. to: Not as simple as that, unfortunately. The original question was: Is there any ...
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What does “duly” mean in the phrase “duly noted”?

The phrase "duly noted" is very common, but I have never used the word "duly" outside of this context. What is the meaning of the word "duly", and what does it add to the word "noted"? I would ...
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Opposite of “most recently”

What is a good way to formulate the opposite of "most recently"? For example, Display the five most recently updated streams. The two most recently hired coders are doing a great job. How ...
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“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
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4answers
297 views

“Deliberate recluse” or “deliberately reclusive”

I was touching up my profile when I came upon this: Aspiring autodidact, deliberate recluse. Is the phrase deliberate recluse syntactically correct, or should I use deliberately reclusive ...
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4k views

“Through” or “throughout”

In the conclusion of an essay, which fits better? Through this experience, ... Throughout this experience, ... It sounds better to me with throughout, but I really do not know why. Any ...
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1answer
184 views

Is the predicative proper in this example?

I object to praises that are too abundant and too often. Does the meaning of abundant fit here? Often is an adverb, so can it be used as a predicative which is usually adjective or noun?
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Difference between “publicly” and “publically”

I know publically appears as an incorrect spelling in most dictionaries (in fact as I type this up on my Safari browser it keeps trying to correct the spelling to publicly). However I have seen the ...
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Increasingly + positive or increasingly + comparative?

For instance, would you rather say "It became increasingly hard" or "It became increasingly harder"? From my understanding, both are possible, but their meaning is slightly different. The first ...
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1answer
497 views

Can omitting -ly suffix of an adverb cause ambiguity?

Sometimes, I forget to use the proper form when an adverb is required. Or sometimes it simply doesn't appear to me one is required, unless I actually consider the grammar of my sentence. I suppose ...
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Why has Southern US English all but abandoned adverb forms?

In Southern US English, adverb forms are almost always replaced by their adjective forms. For example: The journey was awful long. He's running real fast. He ran to the store quick. He ...
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3answers
793 views

Meaning of “triple up”

I understand the meaning of "triple", but what does "triple up" mean? What is the meaning of "up"? Our campuses are increasing class sizes. Services may be diminished. Even in residence halls, ...
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324 views

Past Simple and Past Perfect Simple with 'already'

Do these two sentences have the same meaning? When we arrived, David had already got home and When we arrived, David was already home
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Can “already” be used after a simple past verb in American English?

A British colleague asked if these two sentences are grammatically acceptable in American English: They found already high recognition in Europe and we wish to carry that further. ...
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6answers
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Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
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Usage of “cowardly” and “coward”

I recently discovered that cowardly, which looks like an adverb, is actually also an adjective. So far so good. Then what is the difference between cowardly and coward, and is there any preferential ...
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602 views

Difference between “pull over” and “pull away”

What is the difference between pull over and pull away? I am still trying to get used to American English. It seems like if I do not understand the driving vocabulary I am going to fail in the driving ...
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2answers
11k views

Correct usage of “viz.”?

Are these two sentences examples of the correct use of "viz."? This book is dedicated to my family, viz. my parents and two sisters. The purpose of this book is twofold, viz. 1) to show that [...]; ...
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1answer
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Can I use “verbally” in a written context?

Can I use "verbally" to refer to textual communication? For example, can I say "Verbally encourage this behavior" meaning "Encourage this behavior in writing"?
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582 views

Is this usage of “now” correct?

Consider this piece of a poem: Crouched at the elder's feet, the knight Now kissed his hand in exultation. The world before his eyes turned bright, Forgot his spirit's sore ...
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How much is he keen not to do something when he’s saying “I do never – if I can help it”?

I guess ‘if I can help it’ is a kind of ‘if possible’. It seems help means to prevent or avoid. By the way, how much are the speakers keen not to do something in the following sentences? I can’t ...
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4answers
12k views

Difference between “instantly” and “instantaneously”

Is there a case in which "instantaneously" can be used in which "instantly" cannot? If not, why does the former exist? If so, what are the circumstances dictating that usage?
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Which is correct, “on-line” or “online”?

I am still seeing uses of on-line, though I think it is incorrect. For example: A web browser enables a user to go on-line/online. Can you tell me which is the more appropriate to use, on-line ...
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2answers
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Once/twice/thrice vs one/two/three times

Is there a difference in nuance when using once, twice or thrice instead of one time, two times or three times, especially when counting occurrences? It has happened twice before. It has ...
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2answers
16k views

How to use the words ending with “-ly”?

First question: in the grammar world, where do the -ly ended words belong? Second question: how to use them correctly? Rarely (oops!), if ever, I get myself using -ly ended words in my writing. I'm ...
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508 views

Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
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259 views

Relative clause introduced by an adverb

“Your employment at Chent will terminate directly we find a suitable replacement.” (John Brunner, Quicksand, 1967) This sentence is said by a highly formal and stuffy character. I guess this use ...
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423 views

Why does “whence” have “when” in it?

No definition or usage of whence relates to time, but to place. One would therefore expect it to be some form of where, not of when. What caused when to pertain to time, and whence to pertain to ...
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5answers
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Use of “completely rubbish”

I notice that it is rubbish means it is bad, but can we say it is completely rubbish meaning it is completely bad in everyday English? Do native speakers of English say that, other than the obviously ...
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1answer
92 views

’He was off’ vs. ‘He started’ (in terms of their effect in story telling)

I’m feeling something more energetic from ‘off’ than from ‘start’ because of its shortness and pronunciation, but I don’t know for sure what effect ‘be off’ has in story telling. Is it exactly same as ...
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When to use words quite, rather, pretty, fairly etc

Is there any logic to this or just decision? I would use the following combinations: quite amazing rather large pretty good I would not use the following combinations: pretty amazing quite large ...
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1answer
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“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
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1answer
3k views

“I finally was able” or “I was finally able”?

Is one form wrong or more correct than the other? Or do they have different meanings? I'm a non-native speaker trying to figure it out.
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3answers
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“Goes good with” or “goes well with”

Let's say that A and B are two different kinds of foods. Which is grammatically correct? A goes good with B. A goes well with B. If they're both correct, then which is better?
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Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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2answers
382 views

“While” as a non-temporal adverb

Is it correct in formal writing to use while as a non-temporal adverb? For instance Phenomenon A is generated by XXX, while phenomenon B is generated by YYY Should I rather use : Phenomenon ...
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408 views

Meaning of “around”

In New York Times, Still, rooms were large by the city’s pint-size standards, service was sharp, and for the moment, they offer some of the best values around. What's your understanding of ...
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1answer
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“Done soon” vs. “soon done”

There are a number of colloquial expressions common to my area (see here, for example). I'm relatively recent to the area, so there are a number of expressions that just sound unnatural to me. ...
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1answer
13k views

“Consequently” versus “consequentially”

What is the difference between consequently and consequentially? My usage being what it is, and also according to the dictionary sample sentences I've found so far (thank you for the helpful comment ...
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2answers
8k views

Difference between “partly” and “partially”

What is the difference between partly and partially? An example of usage for each word would be great.
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What is the opposite of “Could you talk a little louder”?

In a conversation, when I don't hear someone, I usually say: Could you talk a little louder please? However, what should I say if: Someone is being very loud in the other room when talking on ...
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Is there a word for a verb which requires an adverb or prep. phrase in order to make sense?

Put is the one I'm thinking of. It is always transitive, but even with a direct object, it still makes no sense without an adverb or prepositional phrase. I put it somewhere. I put it on the ...