An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Which version of this sentence with a linking adverb is grammatically acceptable?

I am unsure if the word "therefore" is called a linking adverb. I have the following sentences. Which version is grammatically acceptable? My preference, therefore, is to travel by train My ...
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Meaning of “over in”

I read this sentence in a book: I just took part in a study over in the Psychology Department. Why do we add over in front of in the here?
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“Already” at the beginning of a sentence

Is it considered good form to use the word already at the beginning of a sentence? For instance: Already in 1930, certain people were watching television in their homes. I have seen it used in ...
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'Yet' is to 'already' as what is to 'eventually'? Could 'never' do?

I don't know if my title serves well in expressing what I am actually trying to ask, so maybe an example will do better: I have done it already. <-> I have not done it yet. I waited ...
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What does “before” mean here?

Kim frequently exhibited her vast knowledge of baseball before complete strangers. Before is usually used to depict a time line, so this use is confusing for me.
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Difference between “presently” and “shortly”

What is the difference between presently and shortly? They seem to have rather similar meanings.
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Using short adjectives as adverbs, such as “easy” & “short”

I know that some adjectives (such as easy & short) can be used as adverbs in some situations, but when can this happen and what adjectives does this apply to? This definitely works: "He stopped ...
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“Increasingly XXX” or “increasingly more XXX”

Which is correct: increasingly XXX or increasingly more XXX, where XXX is an adjective? A colleague and I are disagreeing. I think the use of more is redundant.
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Adverb of “English” [closed]

Dictionary.com defines Englishly as in the manner or style of the English people. Is there an adverb for the word English in the sense of English language? Is there one word for saying in English?
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The correct use of the word “vicariously”

Is it correct English when someone says that they live vicariously through something? If I were to say “I live through the TV”, would I not be living vicariously? So therefore the word vicariously is ...
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What's the deal with “thank you kindly”?

Other questions on this site have established that kindly can be used as a sort of please. This usage was in my mind when someone said "Thank you kindly" to me, but "thank you please" doesn't make ...
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Is it 'what it looks like' or 'how it looks like'?

I live in a country where English is not the native language. Oftentimes I hear my coworkers say they want to know or determine "how it looks like". This is grammatically closer to our native ...
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About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
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Difference between “no more used” and “no longer used”

You can say not used any more just as readily as not used any longer, but it is no more used seems quite wrong compared to it is no longer used. Why?
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What is the best way to convert “tongue-in-cheek” into an adverb?

I was thinking something like "tongue-in-cheekly" but it sounds awkward. Of course, alternatives are welcome, but I couldn't come up with one that conveyed the half-serious playfulness that I ...
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1answer
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Usage of “more than” before a verb

In the Longman dictionary, there is an example for Compensate as follows: Her intelligence more than compensates for her lack of experience. I am wondering what the grammatical point of using ...
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“Too” as a sentence modifier

I was recently having a discussion with a friend on the "sure-thing principle" (not relevant but Google if you wish to know what that is). We were discussing it in the context of a scenario and the ...
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3answers
908 views

“Playing upstairs” vs. “Playing home”

As you know "upstairs" and "home" are both adverb of place. So while it would be correct to say: The kids are playing upstairs. (Here the adverb upstairs provides information about the place of ...
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Is it ok to start a sentence with “also”?

Is it ok to start a sentence with also? Also, I had given him the file you sent me.
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381 views

An adjective for a secret that is known to a third party

I am writing some text for a piece of software and am stuck with this sentence: Use this function if you think that your private key has become known to a third party. While the sentence ...
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“When we X, we can then” vs. “we then can”

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing, but do they differ in linguistic terms?
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newly graduate or new graduate

Which one is correct? I am a new graduate and have been teaching German for a few weeks now. I am a newly graduate and ... I can't decide whether to use "new" or "newly".
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4answers
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Using “actually” to talk about the present

The word "actually" is widely used more or less in the same context as "in fact": You're a doctor, right? Yes ... well, actually / in fact I haven't graduated yet. But, is "actually" also ...
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What does the word “momentarily” really mean? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When and how did “momentarily” come to mean “in a moment”, rather than “for a moment”? Almost every time I fly, shortly (!) before ...
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Different way of writing “attackable” and “repairable” [closed]

In programming, we say an object is capable of doing something. For example, an object may be drivable or repairable. This lets us know what actions the different parts of a computer program are ...
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2answers
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“But (something) instead” versus “but instead (something)”

Please consider the sentences: They do not overpower the city, but empower it instead. They do not overpower the city, but instead empower it. I'm doubting the use of but + instead. Is ...
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Adverbs, prepositions, nouns, “home”, and “about” [closed]

I'm confused about how the following sentences should be analyzed, in terms of which words are prepositions and adverbs, how the phrases break up, etc.: She was going home. She was home. She was at ...
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The difference between “to” and “too” explained for German speakers

In German "to" and "too" translate into the same word "zu". It would therefore be great if somebody could clarify when to use which. E.g. Is it "to dazzle" or "too dazzle"? "to dazzling" or "too ...
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Is “nuancedly” an existing word?

I was typing the following sentence in Microsoft Word: This theme is outlined more nuancedly in this novel. but it marked the word "nuancedly" as being non-existent. I did a search on Google ...
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2answers
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What do ‘it’ ‘on’ ‘off’ mean in “it’ll be on with the old Invisibility Cloak and off to find out what he’s –“

I have trouble understanding the bold part. Harry has a magical map by which he can see where others are. He is looking at the map and paying attention to his enemy schoolboy, Malfoy. ”Well, I’m ...
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“Newly found” vs. “New Found”

What is the grammatically correct way to say the following sentence? "I have come away with a new found respect for the author..." or "I have come away with a newly found respect for the ...
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Clarifying the usage of “hella”

The word hella has spread from the Southern California dialect to the point where most varieties of American English speaker (such as me in the Midwest) know that it exists and hear it used. I always ...
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10answers
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Is there an adverb for “simplified”?

This is what I'm trying to express [Foo] can be simplifiedly characterised as [bar]. However I am unable to find references for such as word as simplifiedly. What I want to say is that the ...
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Adjective or adverb describing promotion of self or group one belongs to

Is there an adjective or adverb depicting self-promotion (or promotion of a group one belongs to)? I am thinking of something that has a somewhat negative connotation, in the spirit of phrases ...
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“Are you sure sure” — is this repetition grammatically correct?

A typical conversation among members of my age demographic could go like this: Person 1: Did you know that x > y?!? Person 2: Are you sure? Person 1: Yeah, I'm sure. Person 2: Are ...
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Which is correct: “I bought it online/offline”

On several occasions, someone has asked me where I purchased my shirt and I replied with "I bought it offline." It didn't sound right to me. My brain thought that I bought it 'off' of something ...
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Which one is correct “You heard it correct” or “You heard it correctly”?

Which one is correct? You heard it correct or You heard it correctly Does the same apply to read it correct[ly]?
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Where should I place the adverb?

Where should I place the adverb? Potentially, it could be moved back to where it was. It could be potentially moved back to where it was. It could potentially be moved back to where it was. ...
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1answer
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Is “I'll when” proper form? [closed]

A friend of mine keeps using a contraction like this and I keep correcting him by asking "I'll what?". He doesn't get it though, and no matter how much I try to explain it doesn't seem to sink in. ...
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‘Not as simply’ versus ‘not as simple’

In this Stack Overflow answer, an editor changed my sentence: Not as simply as that, unfortunately. to: Not as simple as that, unfortunately. The original question was: Is there any ...
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What does “duly” mean in the phrase “duly noted”?

The phrase "duly noted" is very common, but I have never used the word "duly" outside of this context. What is the meaning of the word "duly", and what does it add to the word "noted"? I would ...
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Opposite of “most recently”

What is a good way to formulate the opposite of "most recently"? For example, Display the five most recently updated streams. The two most recently hired coders are doing a great job. How ...
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“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
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“Deliberate recluse” or “deliberately reclusive”

I was touching up my profile when I came upon this: Aspiring autodidact, deliberate recluse. Is the phrase deliberate recluse syntactically correct, or should I use deliberately reclusive ...
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“Through” or “throughout”

In the conclusion of an essay, which fits better? Through this experience, ... Throughout this experience, ... It sounds better to me with throughout, but I really do not know why. Any ...
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1answer
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Is the predicative proper in this example?

I object to praises that are too abundant and too often. Does the meaning of abundant fit here? Often is an adverb, so can it be used as a predicative which is usually adjective or noun?
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Difference between “publicly” and “publically”

I know publically appears as an incorrect spelling in most dictionaries (in fact as I type this up on my Safari browser it keeps trying to correct the spelling to publicly). However I have seen the ...
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Increasingly + positive or increasingly + comparative?

For instance, would you rather say "It became increasingly hard" or "It became increasingly harder"? From my understanding, both are possible, but their meaning is slightly different. The first ...
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Can omitting -ly suffix of an adverb cause ambiguity?

Sometimes, I forget to use the proper form when an adverb is required. Or sometimes it simply doesn't appear to me one is required, unless I actually consider the grammar of my sentence. I suppose ...
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Why has Southern US English all but abandoned adverb forms?

In Southern US English, adverb forms are almost always replaced by their adjective forms. For example: The journey was awful long. He's running real fast. He ran to the store quick. He ...