An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
1answer
144 views

Reword “increasingly too late”

How should I fix a sentence which says "As X disappears, it is increasingly too late to do Y with X"? The sentence seems awkward to me, but "too late" is an adjective, so is the sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
246 views

Avoiding “time-controlledly” as an adverb

I'm currently translating a web site for scheduling software from German to English. So there are many things that this program can do "time-controlledly" (if I translate literally). But this sounds ...
7
votes
1answer
6k views

“Hence” and “hence why”

My question is, is the use of the word "hence", used in it's most common sense as an alternative to "therefore", strictly acceptable in English usage in the following example: I like bananas, ...
10
votes
3answers
6k views

The Royal Order of Adverbs

I know that the pattern manner-place-time shouldn't be taken too seriously if one wants to speak natural English. In real life, people rarely use a string of adverbs. Speakers will easily break the ...
0
votes
2answers
10k views

“Not the same as” vs. “not the same like” [closed]

"Not the same as" and "not the same like" sound both strange to me (non-native speaker). Google finds both versions. Are both okay? Is this phrasing used anyway or would people go for "different ...
-1
votes
3answers
141 views

Use of comma after “accidentally” [closed]

Is a comma required after accidentally? I accidentally sent you the wrong number.
10
votes
1answer
17k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
1
vote
2answers
850 views

Do 'already' and 'just' require the present perfect?

Compare: 'We already/just gave him a response'. 'We have already/just given him a response'. Do 'already' and 'just' strictly require the present perfect?
2
votes
4answers
637 views

How to pronounce “linearly”?

As the title states, how do I pronounce the word "Linearly"? I did some Google searching on this but I was not able to find any guidance.
11
votes
3answers
8k views

Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?

AFAIK the correct grammar for "speak slow" is "speak slowly" (slowly being an adverb). Please correct me if I am mistaken. But in daily life I have not heard anyone saying "Speak slowlier". I think ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
15
votes
3answers
979 views

“You just can't” vs. “you can't just ”

I'm a bit confused about this. Which expression is correct? You can't just do that. or You just can't do that. I'm trying to say: You can't just bash an ideology because of what ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is the phrase “then too” incorrect?

I was told by a school teacher that it was incorrect. I've seen it in articles coming from reputable sources. The general meaning would be similar to the word 'yet', but I can't find any place to ...
3
votes
3answers
13k views

the difference between “really” and “very”

Is the statement below true about the difference between really and very when really means “very” in the example “It’s very/really hot in the summer”? “Really” shows more involvement, even ...
4
votes
6answers
787 views

Which adverb implies supreme confidence, falling just shy of arrogance?

When he participated in debates and round table discussions, Christopher Hitchens spoke with supreme confidence. I'd like to replace with supreme confidence with an adverb that implies supreme ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Usage of “already” and “yet”

I want to know the difference between already and yet in this example: I was surprised that they had __ to decide what to do. My answer on this question was already and my teacher marked it as ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

“Absolute” or “absolutely”?

This question is related to programming, but this seemed a better place to post it than Stack Overflow. To style HTML pages, we frequently deal with positioning, and two common values for the CSS ...
14
votes
4answers
83k views

Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the following over the other two? Get hold of Get ahold of Get a hold of
45
votes
7answers
4k views

What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

“Weekdays” used as an adverb

I found a sentence in Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The bookstore opens weekdays from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. . How do we understand the structure of ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Is “now” grammatical in “Have you now spoken to him?”?

Have you now spoken to him? I really heard that from someone.
1
vote
4answers
11k views

“Without success” vs. “unsuccessfully”

Is the phrase below correct? I have tried to contact the customer without success. Isn't it "I have tried to contact the customer unsuccessfully"?
2
votes
3answers
3k views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
8
votes
2answers
430 views

Why “buy things secondhand,“ not “buy secondhand things”?

I saw the word ‘secondhand’ come after ‘things’ in the lead copy of July 17 Time magazine’s article, titled “10 Things You Should Be Buying Used”, as follows. Buying things secondhand can save a ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

“I remember the day where” vs. “I remember the day when”

What is the difference between "I remember the day where..." and "I remember the day when..."? I think both are used in both written and spoken English. Can we say that "when" makes more sense when ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “ultimated” a word? [closed]

Is "ultimated" a valid word? For example: Range requests were originally proposed by Ari Luotonen and John Franks, using an extension to the URL syntax instead of a separate header field. ...
6
votes
1answer
185 views

“along” in “the wolf passed something along to me”

Here is a quote by Jack Nicolson from the movie "Wolf": Since it happened I feel as though the wolf passed something along to me. I wonder why is along needed in that sentence? What difference ...
6
votes
1answer
263 views

Placement of “just” in “we just need minified and concatenated files” [closed]

I was talking to my client. I wanted to convey that "we need the minified type of files and the concatenated type of files; nothing other than that". I quickly wrote this: we just need minified ...
6
votes
3answers
5k views

“Above”/“below” before/after a noun

I have seen sentences similar to the following: (1) See the reference above. (2) See the reference below. And, (3) See the above reference. But not, (4) See the below reference. ...
4
votes
4answers
848 views

Which is more common - 'the most' or 'most'?

A thing I have never had the time to look more closely into. But I find both variants: What I love most is ... or What I love the most is ... I think the more common form is 'the most', ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

How do you tell if synonyms of “almost” default to meaning “less than”?

Having just had a chat with Em1, I noticed that some words or phrases that mean almost will mean less than when used alone, and other synonyms will mean greater than. For example, nearly and close to ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Can adverbs be also direct objects?

"The irate customer asked for the chef." The irate customer asked something. (Noun phrase?) Since you can fill in something in place of 'for the chef,' does that mean it is a direct object and an ...
0
votes
3answers
590 views

Anyone and everyone - correct usage?

I'm just wondering whether both sentences would be correct: I look into the eyes of anyone who looks at me. I look into the eyes of everyone who looks at me. Would it be correct to ...
1
vote
4answers
5k views

Real quick question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “real” be used as an adverb to describe an adjective? Let me just ask you something real quick. Is my previous sentence wrong? Must the real part be "really"? Some ...
-4
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “technically” and “technologically”? [closed]

What's the difference between technically and technologically? Can you give example sentences which clearly show the difference?
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “leisurely” still acceptable as an adverb?

I am used to seeing "leisurely" as an adjective exclusively, as in "walking at a leisurely pace." But today I read it used as an adverb in a New York Times review of "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Killer." ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
2
votes
4answers
362 views

'too' vs. 'so' in the subjunctive?

A colleague of mine just asked me about the sentence: If the book were not so expensive, I would buy it. She wanted to know why too was not a worthy substitute. I explained to her about the ...
0
votes
3answers
984 views

“Still” versus “Yet”

In the following sentence, is using of yet correct? Inserts settlement in a duty that needs it, in the most suitable yet available place. It seems to me that I must use still instead of yet but ...
0
votes
1answer
437 views

“have to be moved” or “must be moved” or “must move”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I have to” vs. “I must” Which of these is correct? The camera have to be moved sideways instead of rotate to track the scene. or The ...
2
votes
6answers
1k views

“Sure I am not” — is that valid English?

Consider this conversation: — Iceland has more than 200 rainy days per year. — Are you sure? — No, I am not sure. Is it valid or wrong English to say, — No, sure I am not. ...in the ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Adverb form of “sustainable”

I'm translating a sentence to English, and want to use the phrase: All material is produced sustainably. But my spell-check doesn't like the word sustainably, so I looked it up, and have found ...
5
votes
5answers
22k views

When to use “generally”, “usually”, or “normally”

Generally speaking what are the usually accepted usage scenarios for the above mentioned words in a normally occurring English vernacular? In short, what are the rules/guidelines for using generally, ...
3
votes
1answer
5k views

“Unequivocably” vs. “unequivocally”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in a news article titled “SCIENCE WATCH; PROGRESS IN AIDS DISPUTE” in The New York Times (March 10, 1987). Dr. Robert Gallo at the cancer ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is this correct: “Of [something] I have but none”?

This might be a pretty weird question, given that I'm using awkward grammar. Take into account that I'm trying to play with the language. The question is, would the following be correct? Of milk ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Should I say “domesticable” or “domesticatable”? [closed]

What should I say to sound better, "domesticable" or "domesticatable"?
1
vote
3answers
9k views

“Feel like at home”

Feel like at home. Is it correct or must it be "feel at home"? It is in a Euro 2012 commercial, however some experts say it's not correct.
1
vote
3answers
634 views

Is “even” a choice in this sentence?

I would appreciate your help. He is not strong at all. He would not even lift me. I would like to express that he would not even lift me, let alone heavier stuff.
1
vote
3answers
750 views

Adjective & Adverbial forms of “Conspiracy” [closed]

I tried looking up its synonyms (plot, scheme) and then their adjectives, but they didn't quite cut it. Any word that can be used as its adjective and adverb? The place that I would like to use it ...
4
votes
1answer
7k views

Position of 'also'

What is the correct position of the word 'also'? I would like to also talk about ... I would also like to talk about ...