An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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488 views

Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
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1answer
249 views

Relative clause introduced by an adverb

“Your employment at Chent will terminate directly we find a suitable replacement.” (John Brunner, Quicksand, 1967) This sentence is said by a highly formal and stuffy character. I guess this use ...
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2answers
404 views

Why does “whence” have “when” in it?

No definition or usage of whence relates to time, but to place. One would therefore expect it to be some form of where, not of when. What caused when to pertain to time, and whence to pertain to ...
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5answers
2k views

Use of “completely rubbish”

I notice that it is rubbish means it is bad, but can we say it is completely rubbish meaning it is completely bad in everyday English? Do native speakers of English say that, other than the obviously ...
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1answer
92 views

’He was off’ vs. ‘He started’ (in terms of their effect in story telling)

I’m feeling something more energetic from ‘off’ than from ‘start’ because of its shortness and pronunciation, but I don’t know for sure what effect ‘be off’ has in story telling. Is it exactly same as ...
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5answers
13k views

When to use words quite, rather, pretty, fairly etc

Is there any logic to this or just decision? I would use the following combinations: quite amazing rather large pretty good I would not use the following combinations: pretty amazing quite large ...
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1answer
1k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
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1answer
2k views

“I finally was able” or “I was finally able”?

Is one form wrong or more correct than the other? Or do they have different meanings? I'm a non-native speaker trying to figure it out.
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3answers
4k views

“Goes good with” or “goes well with”

Let's say that A and B are two different kinds of foods. Which is grammatically correct? A goes good with B. A goes well with B. If they're both correct, then which is better?
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3answers
4k views

Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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2answers
368 views

“While” as a non-temporal adverb

Is it correct in formal writing to use while as a non-temporal adverb? For instance Phenomenon A is generated by XXX, while phenomenon B is generated by YYY Should I rather use : Phenomenon ...
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3answers
376 views

Meaning of “around”

In New York Times, Still, rooms were large by the city’s pint-size standards, service was sharp, and for the moment, they offer some of the best values around. What's your understanding of ...
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1answer
1k views

“Done soon” vs. “soon done”

There are a number of colloquial expressions common to my area (see here, for example). I'm relatively recent to the area, so there are a number of expressions that just sound unnatural to me. ...
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2answers
12k views

“Consequently” versus “consequentially”

What is the difference between consequently and consequentially? My usage being what it is, and also according to the dictionary sample sentences I've found so far (thank you for the helpful comment ...
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2answers
8k views

Difference between “partly” and “partially”

What is the difference between partly and partially? An example of usage for each word would be great.
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5answers
5k views

What is the opposite of “Could you talk a little louder”?

In a conversation, when I don't hear someone, I usually say: Could you talk a little louder please? However, what should I say if: Someone is being very loud in the other room when talking on ...
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1answer
613 views

Is there a word for a verb which requires an adverb or prep. phrase in order to make sense?

Put is the one I'm thinking of. It is always transitive, but even with a direct object, it still makes no sense without an adverb or prepositional phrase. I put it somewhere. I put it on the ...
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1answer
12k views

Usage of phrase “revert back” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can 'revert' be used as a synonym of 'reply'? Is it correct English to refer to replying to someone or giving feedback as "reverting back"? People in my ...
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4answers
9k views

Explanation of “must needs”

Recently I ran across the sentence: "Just why the law prescribed thirty-nine lashes instead of forty or forty-one and so on, must needs remain unanswered." How did a plural verb like "needs" ...
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4answers
519 views

Is it acceptable to say something is “apropros” of a person?

The sentence I'm crafting is as follows: That's some sage-like advice apropros of Mister Miyagi Is that proper usage of the word?
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1answer
973 views

You are in Jonathan’s circles: “too” or “as well” or “also”?

I just read on Google+ that: You are in Jonathan’s circles too But I always thought that you couldn't use too there. Am I wrong? (because Google can't be wrong, right?)
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2answers
2k views

Correct placing and usage of “yet”

Sometimes I see the sentence Have you done something, yet? Is it correct to write it that way? If not, what would be correct? If it is correct, why is it?
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4answers
3k views

Why is “fastly” not a word?

As well as being an adjective, fast is an adverb. We use it all the time as such: He ran fast. However, though slow is definitely an adjective, it sounds wrong when used as an adverb, because ...
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2answers
12k views

Difference between “recently” and “lately”

I have posted a topic using this sentence: I have picked some fictions to read lately. RegDwight edited this sentence to: I have recently picked up several works of fiction and begun to read ...
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3answers
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“He acted strange(ly?)”

It would make sense if both of these sentences were grammatically correct; but is anything different between them meaning-wise? He acted very strange when I told him about the missing amulet. ...
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2answers
1k views

Synonyms and antonyms for “lacking” or “missing” when something is mandatory

I am searching for the correct term usage in my Java code, although you don't need to know anything about programming to answer my question. My "something" can be "required" (mandatory) or not ...
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3answers
16k views

Is there a difference between “quicker” and “more quickly”

This is a follow up to this question: What is the difference between "quicker" and "faster"? "Quicker" is an adverb, as are "more" (in this context) and "quickly". So is there a ...
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9answers
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Referring to past times with “hence”

From Tor.com, an interesting use of the word hence: Minutes ago, J.K. Rowling finally announced her plans behind Pottermore, the mysterious website that appeared a week hence with only a “Coming ...
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2answers
311 views

Is there a reference book that lists words by usage or theme?

Similar to how a Thesaurus lists synonyms, is there a book that groups words (or phrases) together by conceptual usage? For example, this question is looking for words that describe a person's ...
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3answers
810 views

Does this ‘twice’ mean two times, or double in quantity?

She caught sight of Mr. Diggory’s feet, and slowly, tremulously, raised her eyes to stare up into his face; then, more slowly still, she looked up into the sky. Harry could see the floating skull ...
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3answers
432 views

Term meaning 'with written words'

In the same way that verbally means with spoken words, I'm looking for a term that means with written words. Is there such a word?
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4answers
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“Can hardly wait” versus “can't hardly wait”

This has been bothering me for a while and I'm finally at a forum where I feel like I might get an answer. I have heard people say "I can hardly wait for summer to get here" and I've also heard "I ...
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1answer
318 views

Usage of 'yesterday' for future [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I need <something> yesterday? For couple of times, mostly in movies, I realized that yesterday is commonly used for future. Here is an example sentence: I want ...
3
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3answers
221 views

What sentence parts needs to be repeated here?

What of the following is right? "We need to find out..." "...how to lower the costs or how to produce more." "...how to lower the costs or to produce more." "...how to lower the costs or produce ...
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4answers
838 views

“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
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1answer
868 views

“Experimentally determined” vs. “determined experimentally”

Which of the following sentences is correct? The numbers are experimentally determined. The numbers are determined experimentally. Are both (not) correct and if only one of them is ...
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3answers
160 views

“The team is moving around really effectively.” Is this a correct use of “effectively”?

Something about this sounds wrong to me. The speaker intends the statement to mean that the team is moving around a lot and it is causing them to succeed. "The team is moving around really ...
5
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4answers
14k views

“Too serious” vs “too seriously”

I know the vast majority of people say "Don't take yourself too seriously", as found correct by basically every native speaker I've asked about this (often accompanied by incredulous looks). What ...
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6answers
471 views

Alternative to “lossily compressed”

Is there a better way to say "lossily compressed"? The adverb lossily can not be found in Merriam-Webster, but the adjective lossy can. It also feels a bit unnatural.
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3answers
304 views

Was I correct to use the word “establish” in my tweet? Should I have included adverbial “as”?

English is not my native language, but I'm a willing pupil and in most cases I'm pretty confident in my knowledge, but sometimes I hesitate to use particular words. I wrote this tweet recently: I ...
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2answers
828 views

Why is it, “It seems different”, but “It comes across differently”?

Both phrases describe the manner, appearance, air, etc, of a subject. Why does the former use an adjective to modify the subject, while the latter uses an adverb to modify the verb phrase?
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3answers
24k views

What is the precise meaning of “Pretty Good”?

Once I used "pretty good" as a reply to one of my friends' question "How are you today?", I was under the impression that the "pretty good" will weigh much more than just "good", means "very good" or ...
2
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4answers
2k views

Alternative to “separately from”?

I want to say something like: The system stores the crazygonuts data separately from the data feed. I think this is wrong (maybe I am wrong in that), but I'm not sure exactly why. One ...
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4answers
40k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
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1answer
250 views

Is this usage of 'curiously' correct?

I recently used a sentence similar to the following: Curiously, do you prefer black? Some people found it grammatically incorrect. That was a surprise, for I thought it was perfectly okay. ...
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5answers
453 views

“Sounds almost like” vs. “almost sounds like”

Which sentence structure is more accurate? ... that sounds almost like a command. ... that almost sounds like a command.
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1answer
406 views

“Remain a cool kid” vs. “remain as a cool kid”

Which of the following is grammatical? He wants to remain a cool kid for the rest of his life. He wants to remain as a cool kid for the rest of his life.
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4answers
2k views

Adverb to describe one's career?

I am writing a document where I need to describe a decision I'm making that is beneficial both to my finances and to furthering my career. I'm more partial to using two -ly adverbs to match the rhythm ...
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2answers
294 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
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2answers
6k views

Difference between “less” and “lesser”? [closed]

These two seem very similar. What are the major differences between the two? For example, in the following sentence, Substitute the lesser punishment for the greater one. Can one use "less" ...