An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
1answer
403 views

“have to be moved” or “must be moved” or “must move”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I have to” vs. “I must” Which of these is correct? The camera have to be moved sideways instead of rotate to track the scene. or The ...
2
votes
6answers
1k views

“Sure I am not” — is that valid English?

Consider this conversation: — Iceland has more than 200 rainy days per year. — Are you sure? — No, I am not sure. Is it valid or wrong English to say, — No, sure I am not. ...in the ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Adverb form of “sustainable”

I'm translating a sentence to English, and want to use the phrase: All material is produced sustainably. But my spell-check doesn't like the word sustainably, so I looked it up, and have found ...
5
votes
5answers
19k views

When to use “generally”, “usually”, or “normally”

Generally speaking what are the usually accepted usage scenarios for the above mentioned words in a normally occurring English vernacular? In short, what are the rules/guidelines for using generally, ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“Unequivocably” vs. “unequivocally”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in a news article titled “SCIENCE WATCH; PROGRESS IN AIDS DISPUTE” in The New York Times (March 10, 1987). Dr. Robert Gallo at the cancer ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is this correct: “Of [something] I have but none”?

This might be a pretty weird question, given that I'm using awkward grammar. Take into account that I'm trying to play with the language. The question is, would the following be correct? Of milk ...
0
votes
2answers
936 views

Should I say “domesticable” or “domesticatable”? [closed]

What should I say to sound better, "domesticable" or "domesticatable"?
1
vote
3answers
8k views

“Feel like at home”

Feel like at home. Is it correct or must it be "feel at home"? It is in a Euro 2012 commercial, however some experts say it's not correct.
1
vote
3answers
603 views

Is “even” a choice in this sentence?

I would appreciate your help. He is not strong at all. He would not even lift me. I would like to express that he would not even lift me, let alone heavier stuff.
1
vote
3answers
691 views

Adjective & Adverbial forms of “Conspiracy” [closed]

I tried looking up its synonyms (plot, scheme) and then their adjectives, but they didn't quite cut it. Any word that can be used as its adjective and adverb? The place that I would like to use it ...
3
votes
1answer
6k views

Position of 'also'

What is the correct position of the word 'also'? I would like to also talk about ... I would also like to talk about ...
4
votes
1answer
13k views

“By now” vs “now”

The case is closed by now. The case is closed now. What exactly is the difference between the two?
2
votes
1answer
946 views

The position of 'last' in sentences

My post on another site has prompted me to ask this question. What is the rule of using 'last' in a sentence? For instance: When did you revise this rule last? When did you last revise this ...
2
votes
3answers
55k views

Is 'but rather' considered grammatically correct?

Is this comment that I made here grammatically correct? In Latin, when a group of males and females is combined, the neutral plural form is not used, but rather the masculine is.
6
votes
3answers
948 views

Is it wrong to use “never” for a specific time period?

I usually come late to the daily scrum meetings (but I do compensate, by working late!). For the last 6 working days, I have been coming on time, or even slightly earlier. At lunch, I told my ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is it grammatically correct to add “anyway” at the end of this sentence? [closed]

This is a sentence from a short story I'm writing: "It's all the same to me, because when it comes to our deepest fears and insecurities, we are all alone." I'm not very sure if this is more ...
0
votes
4answers
958 views

Is “relatively big compared to” redundant?

If I say something like He is big compared to the other guy. He is relatively big compared to the other guy. is the adverb relatively wrong because of redundancy?
15
votes
5answers
18k views

“Eventually” vs. “finally”

What is the difference between finally and eventually? He eventually escaped and made his way back to England. He finally escaped and made his way back to England.
18
votes
4answers
31k views

“A bit” vs. “a little bit” vs. “a little”

Is there a difference between a bit, a little bit and a little in the following context? He is a little bit angry. He is a little angry. He is a bit angry. Or do these sentences mean the ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

How to combine “a book about X” with “people are interested in how X works”? [closed]

I would like to know how to correctly combine the sentence 1. with the sentence 2. People are interested in how these algorithms work. I am writing a book about algorithms... [here I need to ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“ 'Such' amount” or “ 'such an' amount”?

Is there any difference between them!? If you google both: 1 and 2, the amount of retrieved results are very similar. I'd like to know if there's any (grammar) rule that makes it clear when to use an ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “all total” grammatically correct?

We have three apples all total. All total, we have 75 bananas. How many cucumbers do we have all total? I have heard many sentences like this. I always wonder, is this grammatically ...
8
votes
2answers
10k views

Can “so” and “very” be used together?

Is it correct to use so and very together in a single sentence? For example: You are so very funny. Is it grammatically correct or not?
0
votes
2answers
499 views

“New diagnosed” vs. “newly diagnosed” [closed]

Which one of the following is correct to use? New diagnosed cases. Newly diagnosed cases.
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Use of “ever” instead of “more and more” [closed]

I wonder if I can use "ever" in place of "more and more". For example, do the following two sentences have the same meaning? Software is getting more and more complex. Software is getting ...
9
votes
3answers
26k views

“Often” and “oftentimes”

Is there any difference between the two terms 'often' and 'oftentimes'? They seem to be used interchangeably but is one more appropriate in certain situations than others? Is 'oftentimes' an older ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the correct usage of 'formerly' as time adverb?

PLEASE NOTE: JDK6 [is|was] formerly known as Project Mustang In the previous sentence what is correct 'is' or 'was'? and why? While reading a bug report I found this sentence with 'is' and now I'm ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

The use of “bad” vs the use of “badly.” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” Which of the following is more grammatically correct? I feel bad for her. or I feel ...
1
vote
4answers
761 views

What is the adverb for 'seasoned'?

I am looking for a word that means the blend of maturely, beautifully, and correctly and has to be used the way some art is executed, for example: Just for the sheer beauty of it, without ...
4
votes
4answers
32k views

“Henceforth” vs. “hereinafter”

What is the most suitable way to express that a sentence/word will be "replaced by" another sentence/word, from that point (in a text, for instance)? Henceforth called/named... Hereinafter ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Which of these sentences use proper grammar?

Unfortunately, there currently is not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, there is currently not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Adverb with or without hyphen?

Remarkably low condensation temperature or Remarkably-low condensation temperature? The focus of remarkable is that it is such a low temperature. We are having an office disagreement and any help ...
3
votes
2answers
879 views

Usage of the word “latest”

Raj has breakfast almost always before 7:45 AM. On rare occasions, he has after 7:45 AM, but never after 8:00 AM. So If he says "I always have my breakfast latest by 8:00 AM" to convey this fact, is ...
1
vote
4answers
5k views

Are 'effectually' and 'effectively' completely interchangable?

In the OED: effectively, (adverb)—in such a manner as to achieve a desired result: make sure that resources are used effectively. effectual, (adjective)—successful in producing ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
1
vote
6answers
527 views

How far is the safari park from here?

Which is/are the correct and natural answer(s) to this question? It is ten miles far from here. It is ten miles far away from here. It is ten miles far away. It is ten miles away. ...
4
votes
1answer
460 views

“Instantly” vs “instantaneously” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Instant” vs. “instantaneous” I know there is a similar question already answered, but I still have doubts. I was doing a word formation FCE ...
6
votes
3answers
440 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
4
votes
3answers
12k views

“Definitely” vs. “absolutely”

What's the difference between absolutely and definitely? Actually which of the following sentences is correct? You are definitely right. You are absolutely right.
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“overly confident” vs “over confident”

I hear or read both phrases regularly, and they seem to have the same meaning to me. But do they have different meanings? Or is “overly confident” even grammatically correct?
2
votes
1answer
612 views

Using “subject to” with a verb other than “to be”

Is it possible to use subject to with a verb other than to be? for example: The self-image is subject to changes. (Obviously OK) Being bound to our self-image we react subject to behavior ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
2
votes
1answer
161 views

Parse tree of “several more successful books”

Let us consider the following sentence: After that first attempt, she wrote several more successful books. Does this mean she wrote several additional books that were also successful? Or that ...
3
votes
2answers
9k views

“Appointed as” or just “appointed”?

Is it more correct to say a) John was appointed as manager of ACME. or b) John was appointed manager of ACME. Or are they interchangeable?
5
votes
3answers
498 views

Position of adverb “implicitly”

In the following sentence I'm not sure where to put implicitly: The language doesn't support Int and (implicitly) converts (implicitly) Int to Double (implicitly). First I put it at the end, ...
14
votes
6answers
189k views

Difference between “supposedly” and “supposably”

What is the difference between supposedly and supposably? Both are real words but seem to have confusingly similar definitions. Supposably: Capable of being supposed : conceivable ...
10
votes
2answers
4k views

Inversion in “only [adverb] have they”

I have seen this construction quite often: Online ads have been around since the dawn of the Web, but only in recent years have they become the rapturous life dream of Silicon Valley. What ...
1
vote
1answer
5k views

What is “context specific”?

In the following sentence: They neglected the fact that development necessarily is culture and context specific and that the specificity concerns the observer as well. What does it mean that ...
3
votes
3answers
173 views

“At least make this” vs “make this at least” - which is grammatical?

Which one of the following sentence is grammatically correct? Can we at least make this predictable? Can we make this at least predictable? What is the grammar rule?
5
votes
3answers
7k views

“Always” vs. “forever”

What is the difference between always and forever? Are they synonyms used in different contexts or can they be used interchangeably?