An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why is an adverb not an adjective used? [migrated]

In the sentence: He did not pass the course as easily as he thought he would. Why is easily (an adverb) used? Why is easy (adjective) not correct?
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87 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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63 views

Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
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3answers
77 views

“Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”

I'm editing a short movie. In the title screens, after the production company is listed, there needs to be a play on the common "Proudly Presents" text. It is with some chagrin that the production ...
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43 views

Can “definitely” be used as a conjunction? [on hold]

Under any circumstances, is it possible for the adverb "definitively" to be used as a conjunction?
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1answer
45 views

“in danger”: an adverb or an adjective?

Is the expression "in danger" an adverb or an adjective? Why?
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634 views

Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
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1answer
34 views

In theory or theoretically: use of adverbs

Which form is more correct or more readable for writing a scientific article: In theory D is constant when q tends to infinity. or Theoretically D is constant when q tends to infinity. Thanks
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Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
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2answers
37 views

Commas with conjunctive adverbs [closed]

Which is correct? Certainly that was a good thing. or, Certainly, that was a good thing.
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What is the form and origin? [closed]

My name is Ndoumbe Belle and I've been asked to give the form, origin and meaning of twenty words. Please I need your help.
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1answer
55 views

No adverb of controlled?

Can anyone confirm that there is indeed no adverbial form of "controlled" that could be used with verbs that describe actions done in a controlled way. For example, it seems to be wrong to write ...
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2answers
564 views

Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?

I'm an American living in America, but my workplace has a lot of immigrants from India here. They all use "thrice" very commonly, which is wonderful to my ears! Thrice is such a delightful word. ...
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75 views

I know this sentence is wrong but

I'm trying to explain to the person who wrote it, and to myself, why it is wrong. Dan plays the drums as vindictively as though they’d personally insulted him. The "as adverbially as though" is ...
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946 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
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3answers
3k views

What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
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3answers
956 views

Does the word “apparently” imply that I personally do or don't believe the statement following it?

When I say "Apparently, xyz", does that imply one of the following, and if so, which one? From observation, I believe xyz to be true, but I leave open the possibility that I might be wrong. I ...
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2answers
76 views

such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
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2answers
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the X event after next…Th

Is it grammatically correct to say "at the steering committee meeting after next"? The idea is that there are meetings every two weeks, but the intention is for something to be presented not at the ...
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37 views

Which verb has been modified?

Which verb has been modified by adverb "directly" in the following sentence? "Some governments even offer to help protect their critical infrastructure directly, by deploying sensors in the networks ...
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37 views

What does “not perhaps” mean?

What exactly does "not perhaps" mean? I encountered it in Smith's The Wealth of Nations In Chapter I. Of The Division Of Labour: The effects of the division of labour, in the general business of ...
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1answer
121 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...
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3answers
1k views

Clarifying the usage of “hella”

The word hella has spread from the Southern California dialect to the point where most varieties of American English speaker (such as me in the Midwest) know that it exists and hear it used. I always ...
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3answers
73 views

Mandatory use of adverbs?

Today I was debating whether the use of the adverbs such as 'well', 'badly', 'poorly' must be used after verbs like 'behave' and 'conduct'. Many times I am faced with sentences such as: A court ...
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Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
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1answer
78 views

What is the word “funny” modifying in this sentence?

I don’t understand why Daniella is acting so funny. Is funny modifiying Daniella (which would make it an adjective) or is it modifying acting (making it an adverb)? Is there any way to tell ...
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1answer
105 views

Can I delete the relative adverb “where” anytime?

Can I say, "You can stand in the house Romeo and Juliet fell in love." In this case, relative adverb 'where' was deleted. But I think there should be "in" at the end of the sentence. Am I right? Can ...
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“Can easily be” vs. “can be easily” — what's the difference?

I'm wondering what the difference is between: It can easily be obtained. It can be easily obtained. Also, what's the preferred way to write it? If there is any... I googled for both ...
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2answers
168 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
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29k views

When to use commas in a sentence that starts with “finally”, “additionally”, etc.?

If I have a sentence that starts with additionally, finally, consequently, etc. do I always have to put a comma after it? Or is there a different rule?
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10k views

What is the difference between “maybe” and “may be”?

What is the difference in meaning and usage between maybe and may be? Are they synonymous?
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1answer
2k views

“overly confident” vs “over confident”

I hear or read both phrases regularly, and they seem to have the same meaning to me. But do they have different meanings? Or is “overly confident” even grammatically correct?
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1answer
404 views

Why is there no such word as “percentagely”?

If I want to use an adverb to say, for example: I'm not sure you could do it. I can say that percentagely / in percentage there are few hopes. Is there a specific reason there is no such word in ...
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3answers
90 views

Proper placement of “exactly”?

I want to ask a question whose meaning is "what is the exact way in which X works?". Where is the most appropriate place for the adverb "exactly"? How exactly does X work? How does exactly X work? ...
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1answer
13k views

“Consequently” versus “consequentially”

What is the difference between consequently and consequentially? My usage being what it is, and also according to the dictionary sample sentences I've found so far (thank you for the helpful comment ...
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Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
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1answer
99 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
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63 views

Is it common to use “totally” in such a way as “Michelle Obama’ s totally running in California.” [duplicate]

Vanity Fair magazine (October 23 issue) carried an article titled, “A brief history of Michelle Obama career-goal rumors,” and wrote as follows under the caption, “She’s totally running in ...
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129 views

Can you end a sentence with 'hence'?

Pretentiousness/archaism aside, does the sentence Any changes that were made have been detailed hence. make sense? The context would be that the descriptions of changes would be found in the ...
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4answers
42 views

Discerning between as and so?

I would appreciate it, if someone readily explain the difference between these. As, I yet to get what the first one means precisely, I had to broach such a discussion. UPDATED: The world was created ...
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1answer
6k views

“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
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2answers
135 views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
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1answer
27 views

Do certain contrasting conjunctions + certain contrasting adverbs = redundancy?

For example, would the following sentence with either ‘rather’ or ‘instead’ included in the middle (or, for that matter, with ‘instead’ alone at the end) be redundant. If a redundancy, would it rise ...
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1answer
133 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
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1answer
35 views

Adverb of frequency + connection adverb

When I normally use "perhaps" (or "maybe") and want to emphasize it, I put it the beginning of the sentence. Perhaps a better approach is to save the status of the button and restore it. Now, I ...
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47 views

Is usually tired, usually tired, and feels tired?

She is usually tired after coming back from school. She usually tired after coming back from school. She usually feels tired after coming back from school. Which one is correct? ...
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1answer
218 views

When and how did “pretty” enter English as an intensifying adverb?

Today I saw an idiomatic road sign: "Pretty Muddy". I found this lack of strict English on a road sign unusual (on par with my "Dead Slow" official speed limit sign in Leeds, pic below), but as it ...
3
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1answer
751 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
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1answer
55 views

Can I write “this closely”? [closed]

Did I use the adverb correctly in the following sentence? Marriage is one of almost global human institutions, and no institution has affected human beings this closely. Is it correct to use ...
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5answers
117 views

Adverb equivalent of Wirelessly for wired

It does not matter whether you connect wirelessly or by wires. While this seems to sufficiently convey my intent, I find myself personally hesitating anytime I speak or type it, as it feels ...