An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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six points clear of Jack in fifth place

a. In the most recent rankings, Don sits six points clear of Jack in fifth place. b. In the most recent rankings, Don sits six points clear of Jack, in fifth place. In the second sentence there is ...
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50 views

Subordinating Conjunctions and Conjunctive adverbs

Is there way to identify which words are Subordinating Conjunctions and which are Conjunctive adverbs, or do we need to memorize it? Both seems similar to me Subordinating Conjunctions: Although, ...
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46 views

Can I use 'a little' at the end of this sentence?

I know 'a little' can be used as an adverb to modify an adjective as in the sentence: I am a little hungry. However, can I also use 'a little' just like this in this sentence as well? I am ...
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66 views

While and When phrases in future tense [migrated]

When I am using future tenses, why do "while" and "when" clauses have to be in present tense? For instance, "While I am eating you will be speaking on the phone" and "I will be waiting when your ...
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400 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
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29 views

Is “very much” an adverb or an adjective? [migrated]

I would like to know what "very much" is in terms of grammatical classification. Adjective, adverb, etc. Thank you very much
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1answer
53 views

adverbial markers

1) "Even in those days he played golf every wednesday.".., in this sentence there are two adverbial markers(in those days and every wednesday) so which marker is considered as reference time and ...
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30 views

Adverb or Adjective

What would be correct: Use an adverb to modify another adjective or simply an adjective in the following sentence? The technique generates unnecessary large number of classifiers The ...
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1answer
80 views

non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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2answers
14 views

names for repetitive sequences

The words once, twice, thrice describe the number of repetitions in a series of such repetitions or possible repetitions. I have searched several authoritative dictionaries & thesauruses without ...
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43 views

Adverb at the end of a sentence

Is the "in them" in this sentence necessary? Globalization is an aggregation of international processes that benefit the countries that participate in them.
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2answers
199 views

Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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4answers
499 views

How do you call..? vs. What do you call…?

It seems an open-and-shut case, the correct version for asking the word of something in English is What do you call ... ? And yet the sheer number of second-language speakers of English who ask ...
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30 views

amazing and beautiful [migrated]

If I want to describe something and I say it looks amazingly beautiful or it looks amazing beautifully what should come first adverb or adjective in this example?
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1answer
44 views

Word for something 'done out of anger'? [closed]

Is there one word that suggests that something was 'done out of anger'? Usage similar to something done deliberately or intentionally, only including the motivation of anger.
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3answers
39 views

Is that “the most” or just “most” to be used for a superlative of an adverb?

I wonder whether to use the determinant "the" when it is to be used for superlative of an adverb as follows: (A) These neurons innervate most densely to layer 1. (B) These neurons innervate ...
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4answers
98 views

“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
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48 views

Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. vs. I arrived home. "Arrive" is an intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object, but 'home' is an adverb of place and I don't think any preposition can be used ...
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53 views

I washed the dishes clean

Firstly, is "I washed the dishes clean." a grammatically correct sentence? If it is right, I have a question about it: in this sentence, is "clean" an adverb or an adjective? I think that "I cleanly ...
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3answers
59 views

object or adverb

I'd like to ask that in the sentence 'I go to him' , is 'him' direct object (or 'to him' is prepositional phrase functioning as adverb . I know that I go to the cinema , 'to the cinema' is adverb of ...
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18k views

Is there a comparative form of “well”?

Is there a word that means "more well", in the same way that "better" means "more good"? In common parlance most people just use "better" for this purpose, but this sounds wrong and is a nagging ...
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4answers
13k views

Which is correct, “on-line” or “online”?

I am still seeing uses of on-line, though I think it is incorrect. For example: A web browser enables a user to go on-line/online. Can you tell me which is the more appropriate to use, on-line ...
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1answer
74 views

Can one form an adverb from any adjective?

I'm trying to form the following sentence: ...we can talk more substantiatively in the event that X occurs. The term "substantiatively" isn't in either the computer dictionary or online at ...
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3answers
203 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
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1k views

different usage of the word “only”

What is the difference between the following sentences? Basically, I would like to understand how the meaning changes with the usage of only in each of them. He only speaks English. He speaks only ...
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1answer
52 views

Position of “still”

I wonder which once is correct: He might still be waiting for you. or He might be still waiting for you. Do they mean the same?
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44 views

“With this, …” at the beginning of a sentence followed by comma

I am reviewing a scientific article for the professor I work for. I found that his use of "With this, ..." at the beginning of a sentence followed by a comma was weird so I suggested he remove or ...
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2answers
63 views

Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs as seen in "come inside" and "run around". My question concerns an ...
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before going to bed or before going to the bed [migrated]

My name is Sósimo Romero Domínguez. I want to know what is the correct way to write the following sentence. What is it correct? Greetings.
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114 views

Punctuation before and within an adverb clause

I have a sentence which includes two independent elements connected by 'and' within an adverb clause. Do I still place a comma before the and? Ex: Jett's dad died when he was seven and his little ...
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1answer
40 views

Starting a sentence with “and”-connected adverbs or adverbials

I want compare one thing with two other things, discussing their differences as follows. Balls are better than dice, since they provide better rollability. Moreover and in contrast to eggs, ...
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37 views

“Trivially translate” vs. “translate trivally” — which is corrent?

Which one is correct? Do both sentences have the same meaning? The table definition does not trivially translate to the underlying data structures. The table definition does not translate ...
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1answer
3k views

Usage of “cowardly” and “coward”

I recently discovered that cowardly, which looks like an adverb, is actually also an adjective. So far so good. Then what is the difference between cowardly and coward, and is there any preferential ...
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21 views

Verbs used as infintives

I want to go home. We come to help him. He was the first guy in our crowd to marry. Why "to go" is use as a noun vs. "to help" is used as an adverb vs. "to marry" is used as an adjective?
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23k views

“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
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What's a word for when you try to be something?

I don't mean it in a way where you're trying to be something that you're not, rather, where you're trying to be more of something that you already are (maybe not 100% of the time but you still have ...
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1answer
37 views

Adverb “already”

I have got a question about the adverb "already". Where should we put it in the sentence? Is "already" put after a subject and auxiliary verb but before predicate verb in the sentence? May we also put ...
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1answer
19k views

When do we use “rarely, hardly, seldom”?

I'd like to know when should we use "rarely" and "hardly" and "seldom". Can we use these adverbs in the same situation? Or do we need to follow some criteria for using those different adverbs?
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4answers
704 views

Anyone and everyone - correct usage?

I'm just wondering whether both sentences would be correct: I look into the eyes of anyone who looks at me. I look into the eyes of everyone who looks at me. Would it be correct to ...
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45 views

Can you say “reasonably technically possible”?

I am translating an agreement into English. Can you say "destroy confidential information to the extent reasonably technically possible"? It may be difficult to destroy ALL back-up copies of digital ...
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8k views

“He acted strange(ly?)”

It would make sense if both of these sentences were grammatically correct; but is anything different between them meaning-wise? He acted very strange when I told him about the missing amulet. ...
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Can “yet” modify adjective? [closed]

I think it can, but I am not sure. For example: He's the lord in the yet functioning duchy of [duchyName] (I am trying to imply that while the duchy is still present, it may crumble in the ...
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3answers
1k views

Alternative phrase to “highly paid job”

James: I make 10000 USD a month. Alice: Wow, you have a highly paid job. Is the phrase “highly paid job” correct? I think yes, but also wish to ask the native speakers here. I assume that ...
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3answers
97 views

Collocation 'bolt upright'

What part of speech is the word 'bolt' in the adverb 'bolt upright'?
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1answer
58 views

Using too many 'to's in a sentence?

This may be more of a stylistic question than anything else, but I'm hoping for some general rules about using the word 'to' in a sentence and when it might be used too many times. For example, I'm ...
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3answers
34 views

Can we reduce this adverb clause? “In winter, the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as when they were first discovered by Cartier.”

Can we change it to "...as when first discovered by Cartier"? Is " when they were first discovered by Cartier" an adverb clause? Or does the adverb clause start with "as isolated as..."? Is either ...
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1answer
62 views

Need a comma before an adverb as last word in sentence?

When an adverb is the last word in a sentence, is it preferable to insert a comma before that word or to leave it as is (with no comma)? For example: How many employees, roughly? or How many ...
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3answers
673 views

Three Consecutive Verbs?

Let's say you're in an interview and the interviewer leans forward and says: "I want to get to know you better." In this context, which is the verb? My initial reaction is: Want - auxiliary verb To ...
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66 views

'Well' after: How to use 'well after' in a sentence? [closed]

She waited till well after midnight. What does well after signify here? There are 51 definitions of well at the Merriam Webster Dictionary. It is not immediately obvious which one applies here. ...
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105 views

Can I say “more better” in unusual circumstances like this?

I was talking a few minutes ago and found myself completely stumped as to how to phrase a statement without taking thirty minutes to say what I was trying to say or breaking a grammatical rule and ...