An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
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4answers
61 views

Is there an adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?

“Still” means “in the past and now”: “It is still raining.” Is there an English adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?
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1answer
114 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
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2answers
78 views

Using adjectives after verbs?

In a lot of sentences when speaking people use adjectives after verbs. In some examples it sounds right, however, and I was wondering if such uses were valid in formal writing. The only example I ...
2
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3answers
342 views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
5
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2answers
700 views

Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
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1answer
1k views

Using short adjectives as adverbs, such as “easy” & “short”

I know that some adjectives (such as easy & short) can be used as adverbs in some situations, but when can this happen and what adjectives does this apply to? This definitely works: "He stopped ...
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4answers
143 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
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4answers
411 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
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2answers
272 views

'solid' used as an adverb

The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition contains the following (on the hyphenation or otherwise of compounds): 6.38: The trend in spelling compound words has been away from the use of hyphens; ...
2
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1answer
78 views

Is “Tomorrow, I will buy it” correct? [on hold]

My brother and I are having a discussion, whether it is grammatically correct (or any native speaker would ever say a sentence): Tomorrow, I will buy it. I think it is not correct, it strikes me ...
2
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3answers
70 views

“This is particularly since…”

Recently I came across this sentence: [... allegations that such information had been used elsewhere] This is particularly since you were given access to the information. I have been trying to ...
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1answer
68 views

No adverb of controlled?

Can anyone confirm that there is indeed no adverbial form of "controlled" that could be used with verbs that describe actions done in a controlled way. For example, it seems to be wrong to write ...
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1answer
45 views

Meaning of snobbishly [closed]

I'm reading The Great Gatsby and on the second page it says: As my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth. ...
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3answers
8k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I’m doing great”?

Since great is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say “I’m doing greatly”?
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1answer
244 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
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1answer
45 views

To Witness Something of Such Beauty

There is a word used in English but from Italian (I think) which has the following meaning: To witness something or someone of such profound beauty that you are compelled to sing aloud in ...
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2answers
60 views

Replacement for “narrowly missed?”

I am trying to remove adverbs from my writing. My grant proposal narrowly missed the funding threshold. I want to replace the phrase "narrowly missed" or change the whole sentence but still ...
0
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2answers
112 views

such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
6
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3answers
4k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
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1answer
41 views

Capital letter after adverb [closed]

In sentences like: Also, it provides ... Also, It provides ... is it allowed to place It (with a capital I) instead of it after the adverb Also?
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3answers
228 views

“When we X, we can then” vs. “we then can”

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing, but do they differ in linguistic terms?
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1answer
160 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...
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1answer
38 views

Is “originally first” a grammar error?

I understand that the phrase "originally first" is repetitive, but is it a grammatical error? For more context, the phrase appeared in the following sentence which was marked wrong for repetition. ...
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5answers
7k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
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2answers
30 views

How to choose between “spatial” or “spatially”?

I'm writing my thesis and I need help with the title, here it is: Improved seam merging for temporally and spatially video resizing with structure and motion preservation I am not sure about the ...
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1answer
61 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...
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2answers
145 views

Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...
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3answers
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Is it 'what it looks like' or 'how it looks like'?

I live in a country where English is not the native language. Oftentimes I hear my coworkers say they want to know or determine "how it looks like". This is grammatically closer to our native ...
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1answer
53 views

Is usually tired, usually tired, and feels tired?

She is usually tired after coming back from school. She usually tired after coming back from school. She usually feels tired after coming back from school. Which one is correct? ...
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7answers
9k views

“I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you”

What is the correct usage? Apparently it is "I feel badly", but but wouldn't that mean you have an inadequate ability to feel?
2
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1answer
136 views

“Feeling well” adverb ambiguity

Am I just crazy, or is there some ambiguity in the phrase "feeling well"? Example: Billy has a genetic defect that causes him to lose sensation in his fingertips every few days, or so. "How are you ...
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2answers
729 views

Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
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1answer
53 views

Usage of the word “Doggedly”

At the end of chapter 16 of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the author states: After that day, a day rarely passed without her drawing the hammer on her slate, and without Orlick's ...
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2answers
115 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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2answers
19 views

Can I wish someone on new home as “ my cordial wishes to your family on new home” [closed]

I would like to wish my boss on her new home. Is the below statement correct? My cordial wishes to your family on new home
2
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1answer
45 views

Use of “respectively” in “both these localities are on the banks, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream”

Both these source localities are on the banks of the Rhine, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream from Bonn. In the above sentence, is respectively needed, and if so, is it properly used?
4
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4answers
25k views

“Henceforth” vs. “hereinafter”

What is the most suitable way to express that a sentence/word will be "replaced by" another sentence/word, from that point (in a text, for instance)? Henceforth called/named... Hereinafter ...
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4answers
671 views

Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Is it correct to say “more sufficient”?

I suggest that the maintenance period be from 12:30 to 2:30 so that we can have more sufficient time to handle if any unexpected problems occur. Is it correct to say more sufficient?
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0answers
4 views

Why is an adverb not an adjective used? [migrated]

In the sentence: He did not pass the course as easily as he thought he would. Why is easily (an adverb) used? Why is easy (adjective) not correct?
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3answers
95 views

“Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”

I'm editing a short movie. In the title screens, after the production company is listed, there needs to be a play on the common "Proudly Presents" text. It is with some chagrin that the production ...
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1answer
60 views

“in danger”: an adverb or an adjective?

Is the expression "in danger" an adverb or an adjective? Why?
2
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1answer
39 views

In theory or theoretically: use of adverbs

Which form is more correct or more readable for writing a scientific article: In theory D is constant when q tends to infinity. or Theoretically D is constant when q tends to infinity. Thanks
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3answers
2k views

Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
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2answers
41 views

Commas with conjunctive adverbs [closed]

Which is correct? Certainly that was a good thing. or, Certainly, that was a good thing.
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2answers
587 views

Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?

I'm an American living in America, but my workplace has a lot of immigrants from India here. They all use "thrice" very commonly, which is wonderful to my ears! Thrice is such a delightful word. ...
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2answers
78 views

I know this sentence is wrong but

I'm trying to explain to the person who wrote it, and to myself, why it is wrong. Dan plays the drums as vindictively as though they’d personally insulted him. The "as adverbially as though" is ...
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2answers
990 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
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3answers
3k views

What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...