4
votes
1answer
55 views

Rules governing “quite a [adjective]” word order

As part of an answer on another StackExchange site, I have a sentence reading, in part, "[A religious manual] which has quite a long section on [the subject of the question] says ..." I was looking ...
0
votes
4answers
103 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
-1
votes
2answers
54 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Which position does “really” and “quite” go?

I know really is an adverb, and one that intensifies the verb. I also know that some adverbs go only in the beginning; in the middle or at the end of a sentence, and some can be placed in all three ...
4
votes
1answer
268 views

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb?

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb? In some cases, it seems to be more natural to have the adverb follow the verb, as in: “She moved slowly and spoke ...
3
votes
2answers
547 views

The position of “always” in different sentences [closed]

I want to know about the position of always in different sentences. For example: Always she is tidy and on time. Is it correct or not?
1
vote
0answers
26 views

“Went to school happily” vs. “happily went to school” vs. “went happily to school” [duplicate]

The boy went to school happily. The boy happily went to school. The boy went happily to school. If the adverb “happily” is allowed to be put in the three places above, what are the ...
0
votes
2answers
128 views

What are the differences between “go to school happily”, “go happily to school” and “happily go to school”?

There are three similar phrases which I would like to know the differences between: go to school happily go happily to school happily go to school I have long been confused by the ...
2
votes
3answers
183 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

“distinguish them more completely” vs. “more completely distinguish them”

Is there a rule I could tell the difference between: Both A and B have other attributes that distinguish them more completely. Both A and B have other attributes that more completely ...
0
votes
3answers
611 views

He truly is great or he is truly great?

Where is the correct place to put the "is"? I speak several languages and get confused when switching from one to the other.
0
votes
1answer
469 views

has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
-1
votes
1answer
975 views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
-1
votes
2answers
124 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
0
votes
1answer
266 views

Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
0
votes
3answers
178 views

“Currently the environment is so contaminated” vs. “the environment is currently so contaminated”

Currently the environment is so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. The environment is currently so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. Are both sentences ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Adverb placement: “There is still” vs. “there still is”

I believe the following sentences are grammatically correct and that perhaps the latter has an emphasizing effect on still in certain contexts. There is still some time left. There still is some ...
3
votes
2answers
404 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
2
votes
1answer
577 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
0
votes
2answers
300 views

Positioning of adverb phrases [duplicate]

Here are three ways to say the same thing. I wonder if there are particular rules regarding to the position of adverb phrases: Then play those passages over and over again in your memory Or, ...
4
votes
1answer
196 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
1
vote
1answer
186 views

Position of adverbial phrase [duplicate]

Is there a difference in these two sentences, and if so, what is the difference? Immediately afterwards I remembered having met her. I remembered having met her immediately afterwards. I think ...
1
vote
4answers
207 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
1
vote
1answer
543 views

If you place an ly adverb after the verb is the meaning different than if it were infront of the verb? [duplicate]

For example: I did not respond physically I did not physically respond I can't escape the sense that #2 'strongly' leaves open the possibility (or implies) that the writer responded some way ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

“The paper on Monday published X” vs. “the paper published on Monday X”

What would be the best position of Monday in the following sentence — before or after the verb? The paper on Monday published what the artist called a blunt attack on people’s right to privacy. ...
1
vote
1answer
163 views

“Would of course be” vs. “of course would be” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the position of 'of course' inside a sentence. Please consider these two versions and comment on that: A comprehensive documentation would of course be highly valuable... ...
4
votes
6answers
6k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
-1
votes
2answers
122 views

“I only have discovered today” vs. “I only today have discovered” vs. “I have only today discovered”

Since I am not a native English speaker it's hard to find anything related to this topic on google. Which of the following word orders is grammatical? I only have discovered today we have a ...
-1
votes
1answer
531 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
0
votes
2answers
462 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
0
votes
1answer
288 views

Adverbs right after the subject [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should an adverb go before or after a verb? Is it correct to write a sentence this way? Now we can speak about the steps that I’ve previously listed. Or it would ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Difference between the two sentences? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” I got confused between these two centences: I answered only four questions in my exam. I only answered four questions in my exam. ...
1
vote
3answers
498 views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
0
votes
1answer
640 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
3
votes
5answers
395 views

“Will shortly appear automatically” — what is the correct order of words in this fragment?

I want to say that an answer will appear shortly, and automatically, on the screen. I'm not sure whether the correct sentence is: The answer will shortly appear automatically. or maybe: The ...
17
votes
3answers
743 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
3
votes
1answer
250 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Place of an adverb in the passive present perfect progressive

I was wondering where an adverb should (or could) be placed in the passive present perfect progressive in English. I have been being carefully tickled. OR I have been carefully being ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
-2
votes
2answers
283 views

Where to place the word “easily”? [closed]

Where should I place the word easily — before or after edit and share your bookmarks? Do you want to edit and share your bookmarks easily? or Do you want to easily edit and share your ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“You should have also named” vs. “you should also have named”

Out of the two sentences, which one is correct? You should have also named it the Daily prophet. You should also have named it the Daily prophet. My guess is it's the first one.
-1
votes
5answers
518 views

“Not once he would” vs. “not once would he”

Not being a native speaker and suffering semantic satiation from overthinking this, I'd like to ask this probably overly simple question. Not once would he... uses reversal for negation and ...
0
votes
2answers
423 views

Word order with “just” and “only” meaning “merely”

Marking a German student's test I have encountered the following problem: The relationship between the two adolescents is one-sided. Just the boy really feels something, the girl hates him. Can ...
0
votes
2answers
957 views

Adverb word order: “nicely shows” vs “shows nicely”

I have the following sentence in my dissertation: The even-tempered STO basis for Mg shows nicely why the virial theorem cannot be trusted as an error indicator. However, previously I had there: ...
3
votes
2answers
553 views

Position of “now”

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? This feature is now disabled. This feature is disabled now.
4
votes
3answers
550 views

Placement of the word “later” in a sentence

Why is it correct to say "it later came to pass" instead of "it came to pass later"? What is the rule for this placement?
4
votes
3answers
91 views

“Really” modification problems

I can read a French newspaper with the aid of a dictionary, but I cannot speak the language or understand it when spoken. So I do not really know French. Some people say that really modifies know; ...