3
votes
1answer
79 views

“X is not dead, it just smells so” [closed]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
1
vote
1answer
42 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
1
vote
3answers
153 views

Is there any archaic word for “finally”?

So I was wondering whether there is any archaic word that means "finally" or "at last"?
2
votes
2answers
263 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
1
vote
2answers
232 views

Shall I use 'thus' or 'thusly'? [duplicate]

Which is correct? ...others are compensated thus. ...others are compensated thusly. This page says 'thusly' is incorrect: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thusly However without the 'ly' is ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Can adverbs also modify/specify the speaker's state of mind, emotion, character, etc. in English?

I don't think there are such adverbs in English that officially indicate the speaker's emotional/mental state, personality, etc. "Could you please let me join your group?" doesn't convey the ...
0
votes
2answers
97 views

How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
2
votes
1answer
441 views

When to use wrong or wrongly as adverbs? [duplicate]

It seems that wrong is not only an adjective, but is also a proper adverb ("You're doing it wrong!", right?). There's, however, an adverb wrongly, which probably means the same thing. Talking about ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Doubtless or doubtlessly?

To my surprise I found that doubtless is used as an adverb without appending the "-ly". Doubtless, some of you will know more examples. It feels wrong, but then again, I am not a native ...
0
votes
2answers
123 views

Substitution of adverb by another “equivalent” word?

In the sentence: Her voice sounds beautiful. She sang the song exactly as it was written. We heard it perfectly. Isn't it feasible to substitute the last word by "perfect"? In Spanish both ways are ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Difference between 'such as' and 'like'

This one never ceases to confuse me. When to use 'such as' and when to use 'like' while giving examples? Is there any clear rule? Metros like Mumbai, Delhi and Karachi are unsafe after dark. ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Usage of the word 'adroitly'

Is it correct to say that a barkeep was "adroitly pouring out drinks behind the bar"? Something rubs me the wrong way here. Perhaps it would be better to use some synonym in this context? If so, which ...
5
votes
1answer
179 views

When and how did “pretty” enter English as an intensifying adverb?

Today I saw an idiomatic road sign: "Pretty Muddy". I found this lack of strict English on a road sign unusual (on par with my "Dead Slow" official speed limit sign in Leeds, pic below), but as it ...
0
votes
1answer
9k views

“Totally agree” and “completely agree”

What is the difference between totally agree and completely agree? In other words, what is the difference in meaning between totally and completely in such combinations in conversations?
12
votes
5answers
492 views

Is it OK to use “empty-handed” on an animal?

Can I write the following? One of the seagulls spotted a fish and dove after it, but came up empty-handed If not, what other word I can use to replace empty-handed?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

“Recently” vs. “lately”

I haven't seen Mr. John __. Which is correct, recently or lately? My uncle has been to Germany lately. Why is the correct answer in the second example lately and not recently?
6
votes
2answers
343 views

A word for something that's done only half-consciously

In writing fiction, I find myself using the word "absentmindedly" a lot, but I don't think it's really the word I'm looking for. I'm not looking so much something done in a distracted manner, but ...
-2
votes
3answers
243 views

“Previously” vs. “last time”

What is the difference between the following two sentences? This is the vendor from which the item was purchased the last time. This is the vendor from which the item was purchased ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

“Firstly, secondly” vs. “Firstly, lastly” when listing just two points

Normally, if we which to illustrate our points, we can use firstly, secondly, lastly (or last but not least or finally). There are a few pieces of information we need to notice: Firstly, ...
1
vote
3answers
313 views

“Above” or “later” when referencing a range of versions of software

Which is correct when referencing an operating system version "OS X 10.6.x and later" or "OS X 10.6.x and above"? Bonus points for providing the why.
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Which one is correct, 'I like this more' or 'I like this better'? [duplicate]

I feel that using 'I like this name more' is more correct than 'I like this name better'. Since English is not my mother tongue, I am not sure.
-1
votes
3answers
77 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
2
votes
1answer
193 views

When would I use “once” versus “nonce”?

Looking at the definitions for once and nonce. they appear very similar to me. Under what circumstances would one or the other be a more appropriate word choice?
1
vote
1answer
405 views

Is this usage of “however” with an adjective correct?

Is the word "however" correctly used in this sentence? If not, how could it be rephrased? This program, however comprehensive, hasn't been updated for a long time. Is there a better construct to ...
0
votes
1answer
979 views

Word to describe things that run after each other [closed]

Is there a word to describe tasks that need to "run one after the other"? My current choice is sequentially, but feel there is a better word.
0
votes
6answers
270 views

Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”

Which one is correct: "personal basis" or "individual basis"? I want to use it in a formal letter. I want to say: "I don't know Mr. X on a personal basis (or individual basis) and I have not had an ...
-2
votes
2answers
155 views

“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

How should I reply to “Dude, are you there?”

Let's say I am having a telephone conference with rest of the team, and somebody asks me "Dude, are you there?" How should I reply? Yes, dude, I am there. or Yes, I am here? It is ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“Overseas” vs. “abroad”

I'm a native speaker of Inland Northern American English. My intuition tells me that the word "abroad" is unremarkable, especially in collocations like "study abroad". However, I've been ...
-2
votes
3answers
2k views

More grammatically correct: “anything but” or “anything except”?

Could you tell me which of these phrases is grammatically correct — "anything but" or "anything except"? If the use depends on context, what are the instances when each must be preferred?
1
vote
2answers
520 views

Using “yet” and “still”

When someone says, The changes have to be updated. someone may reply, Those changes need to be made but the plan to make those changes does not yet exist. (as sometimes found) Is it ...
0
votes
2answers
424 views

Word order with “just” and “only” meaning “merely”

Marking a German student's test I have encountered the following problem: The relationship between the two adolescents is one-sided. Just the boy really feels something, the girl hates him. Can ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

“Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”

I've heard both phrases in everyday speech, so there's little doubt in my mind that the answer is both. I suspect, though, that one of these phrases is more the original than the other, and the other ...
-1
votes
2answers
644 views

Using “henceforth” to refer to future events, but from a “past perspective”

The title isn't great, sorry, I couldn't really come up with anything better :D Here's a bit of context: I'm working on my thesis and am currently writing down the historical evolution of a certain ...
3
votes
3answers
584 views

Alternative phrase to “highly paid job”

James: I make 10000 USD a month. Alice: Wow, you have a highly paid job. Is the phrase “highly paid job” correct? I think yes, but also wish to ask the native speakers here. I assume that ...
5
votes
3answers
328 views

What's the adjective for “by distance”?

If I had to describe a state that occurred only for a certain amount of time, I'd simply use the adjective "temporary" to describe the state (or the adverb "temporarily" to describe the verb). What ...
11
votes
3answers
805 views

Does the word “apparently” imply that I personally do or don't believe the statement following it?

When I say "Apparently, xyz", does that imply one of the following, and if so, which one? From observation, I believe xyz to be true, but I leave open the possibility that I might be wrong. I ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

Reword “increasingly too late”

How should I fix a sentence which says "As X disappears, it is increasingly too late to do Y with X"? The sentence seems awkward to me, but "too late" is an adjective, so is the sentence ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

“Not the same as” vs. “not the same like” [closed]

"Not the same as" and "not the same like" sound both strange to me (non-native speaker). Google finds both versions. Are both okay? Is this phrasing used anyway or would people go for "different ...
0
votes
3answers
887 views

Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
4
votes
5answers
513 views

Which adverb implies supreme confidence, falling just shy of arrogance?

When he participated in debates and round table discussions, Christopher Hitchens spoke with supreme confidence. I'd like to replace with supreme confidence with an adverb that implies supreme ...
0
votes
4answers
5k views

“Without success” vs. “unsuccessfully”

Is the phrase below correct? I have tried to contact the customer without success. Isn't it "I have tried to contact the customer unsuccessfully"?
2
votes
3answers
1k views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
6
votes
1answer
190 views

Placement of “just” in “we just need minified and concatenated files” [closed]

I was talking to my client. I wanted to convey that "we need the minified type of files and the concatenated type of files; nothing other than that". I quickly wrote this: we just need minified ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Adverb form of “sustainable”

I'm translating a sentence to English, and want to use the phrase: All material is produced sustainably. But my spell-check doesn't like the word sustainably, so I looked it up, and have found ...
5
votes
5answers
11k views

When to use “generally”, “usually”, or “normally”

Generally speaking what are the usually accepted usage scenarios for the above mentioned words in a normally occurring English vernacular? In short, what are the rules/guidelines for using generally, ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“Unequivocably” vs. “unequivocally”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in a news article titled “SCIENCE WATCH; PROGRESS IN AIDS DISPUTE” in The New York Times (March 10, 1987). Dr. Robert Gallo at the cancer ...
1
vote
2answers
557 views

Should I say “domesticable” or “domesticatable”?

What should I say better, "domesticable" or "domesticatable"?
1
vote
3answers
479 views

Is “even” a choice in this sentence?

I would appreciate your help. He is not strong at all. He would not even lift me. I would like to express that he would not even lift me, let alone heavier stuff.