0
votes
2answers
33 views

Offers home delivery vs home delivers

In which of these 2 sentences is the verb "Home deliver" used correctly, in compliance with the rest of the sentence? ABC offers home delivery of pharmaceuticals, compounded medications, and wellness ...
4
votes
2answers
115 views

Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
1
vote
2answers
157 views

We say entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, what is the verb?

For the word entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, I would like to know the corresponding verb, i.e the action of doing entrepreneurship, i.e the verb that should fit in the next sentence : To be a good ...
2
votes
4answers
125 views

Verbs that change meaning depending on object position

I was writing a text and I stumbled upon the differences between: Lily slipped and threw up her keys Lily slipped and threw her keys up [in the air] For a moment I was finding phrase 1 more ...
-3
votes
3answers
194 views

Doesn't “Thanks very much.” sound weird? [closed]

Cambridge's English Vocabulary in Use, Pre-Intermediate and Intermediate, gives, as a common way of thanking people, “Thanks (very much).” (third edition, unit 64, page 134, heading C: Thanks and ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
1
vote
4answers
186 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
1
vote
1answer
134 views

“Would of course be” vs. “of course would be” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the position of 'of course' inside a sentence. Please consider these two versions and comment on that: A comprehensive documentation would of course be highly valuable... ...
3
votes
1answer
729 views

Term for verb+adverb with distinct meaning

There are verbs that, when paired with certain adverbs, can have a distinctly different meaning. For example, I looked up the word in the dictionary. The phrase looked up functions as a verb ...
4
votes
6answers
4k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
1
vote
1answer
954 views

“Sent” vs “sent off” vs “sent out”

When do we use one over another? I sent a letter. I sent off a letter. I sent out a letter. Here I found a similar topic but I am still confused. sent = sent to one or more people ...
-1
votes
1answer
393 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
0
votes
1answer
557 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
2
votes
2answers
570 views

In the sentence “My house is down the street”, which word does the adverb “down” modify?

My house is down the street. Does the adverb down modify is, or street?
2
votes
2answers
612 views

What is the correct usage of 'formerly' as time adverb?

PLEASE NOTE: JDK6 [is|was] formerly known as Project Mustang In the previous sentence what is correct 'is' or 'was'? and why? While reading a bug report I found this sentence with 'is' and now I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
425 views

Using “subject to” with a verb other than “to be”

Is it possible to use subject to with a verb other than to be? for example: The self-image is subject to changes. (Obviously OK) Being bound to our self-image we react subject to behavior ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Inversion in “only [adverb] have they”

I have seen this construction quite often: Online ads have been around since the dawn of the Web, but only in recent years have they become the rapturous life dream of Silicon Valley. What ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “more than” before a verb

In the Longman dictionary, there is an example for Compensate as follows: Her intelligence more than compensates for her lack of experience. I am wondering what the grammatical point of using ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“I finally was able” or “I was finally able”?

Is one form wrong or more correct than the other? Or do they have different meanings? I'm a non-native speaker trying to figure it out.
5
votes
1answer
502 views

Is there a word for a verb which requires an adverb or prep. phrase in order to make sense?

Put is the one I'm thinking of. It is always transitive, but even with a direct object, it still makes no sense without an adverb or prepositional phrase. I put it somewhere. I put it on the ...
3
votes
1answer
7k views

Usage of phrase “revert back” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can 'revert' be used as a synonym of 'reply'? Is it correct English to refer to replying to someone or giving feedback as "reverting back"? People in my ...
3
votes
3answers
208 views

What sentence parts needs to be repeated here?

What of the following is right? "We need to find out..." "...how to lower the costs or how to produce more." "...how to lower the costs or to produce more." "...how to lower the costs or produce ...
2
votes
4answers
565 views

“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
21
votes
5answers
5k views

Is there any other way you can “wax” as you do when you “wax philosophical”?

The wax in the phrase "wax philosophical" is a pretty strange bird. Its wax is obviously not the ordinary definition of wax, which my dictionary summarizes as an "oily, water-resistant substance", a ...
3
votes
2answers
509 views

Verb form of “spontaneous human combustion”

In English there are plenty of examples of noun-verbs. What are the rules for making more complex compound noun structures into transitive verbs? In particular I would like explanations involving the ...
5
votes
2answers
889 views

Which one is grammatically correct? Why?

I've a quick question about grammar within a sentence. I'd also like to know why it is like that if someone could provide an answer. Which one is correct? Along with fishing, I enjoy ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?

Why do we use up as adverbs for verbs? For example, 'wake up', 'throw up', etc.
41
votes
9answers
3k views

Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...