3
votes
1answer
729 views

Term for verb+adverb with distinct meaning

There are verbs that, when paired with certain adverbs, can have a distinctly different meaning. For example, I looked up the word in the dictionary. The phrase looked up functions as a verb ...
4
votes
3answers
208 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
3
votes
2answers
649 views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
37
votes
7answers
2k views

What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
-1
votes
3answers
205 views

Different way of writing “attackable” and “repairable” [closed]

In programming, we say an object is capable of doing something. For example, an object may be drivable or repairable. This lets us know what actions the different parts of a computer program are ...