0
votes
1answer
96 views

'the cleanest' vs 'cleanest': article-containing adverb phrases?

We have two phrases structures: 'the nicest in my school' 'the cleanest in my house' These phrases can act as nouns or adverbs: 'He is the nicest in my school.' - noun phrase. 'She cleaned the ...
-1
votes
2answers
59 views

Usage of 'bovinely' when fastness or slowness are involved

I know that in English 'I tried to go as slow as possible' and 'I tried to go as fast as possible' have a very different meaning, but I'm unsure how 'bovinely', before 'possible', change that ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
1
vote
1answer
173 views

How to best explain the use of best?

I've been asked to explain the use of best in the phrase "humans have found how best to live together" other than saying its an adverb I'm stumped, could someone wiser help me out.
4
votes
4answers
496 views

“Most” vs. “most of”

During most of history, humans were too busy to think about thought. Why is "most of history" correct in the above sentence? I could understand the difference between "Most of the people" and ...
1
vote
1answer
150 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A ...
8
votes
2answers
906 views

Is “all total” grammatically correct?

We have three apples all total. All total, we have 75 bananas. How many cucumbers do we have all total? I have heard many sentences like this. I always wonder, is this grammatically ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “I'll when” proper form? [closed]

A friend of mine keeps using a contraction like this and I keep correcting him by asking "I'll what?". He doesn't get it though, and no matter how much I try to explain it doesn't seem to sink in. ...
7
votes
3answers
4k views

What is meant by saying “X, not to say Y”?

When someone says "X, not to say Y", do they mean "X, but not Y" or do they mean "X, and even Y"? Normally I would assume it's the first, but I've seen a few examples where it seems ambiguous. Or ...
5
votes
7answers
54k views

Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

Which one is correct? Similarly, is "do good" correct?