0
votes
1answer
61 views

Understanding how to identify the parts of speech for 'all'

Webster's dictionary lists 'all' as an adjective, adverb, pronoun and noun. Swan's Practical English Usage (3rd edition) spends three pages talking about the usages, but I'm left unsure how to ...
5
votes
5answers
781 views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
1
vote
1answer
166 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
1
vote
1answer
866 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
6
votes
4answers
6k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
3
votes
2answers
857 views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Adverb vs. direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What exactly is an “adverb”? Consider the following sentences: She went home. He swam yesterday. Are the words "home" and "yesterday" adverbs or direct ...
10
votes
1answer
11k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
5
votes
3answers
883 views

Can adverbs be also direct objects?

"The irate customer asked for the chef." The irate customer asked something. (Noun phrase?) Since you can fill in something in place of 'for the chef,' does that mean it is a direct object and an ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
4
votes
4answers
40k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
4
votes
2answers
385 views

What is the word “who”?

Is the word "who" an adverb? If not, what is it? If it is an adverb, what type of adverb is it?