0
votes
1answer
36 views

Meaning of snobbishly [closed]

I'm reading The Great Gatsby and on the second page it says: As my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth. ...
3
votes
2answers
71 views

'to the contrary' - is this definition of 'but' correct?

Merriam-Webster lists 'to the contrary' as one of the senses of 'but.' 3 : to the contrary < who knows but that she may succeed> Being worded like this, I'm having a bit of hard time ...
1
vote
4answers
88 views

meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...
2
votes
4answers
175 views

Verbs that change meaning depending on object position

I was writing a text and I stumbled upon the differences between: Lily slipped and threw up her keys Lily slipped and threw her keys up [in the air] For a moment I was finding phrase 1 more ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What does “barely” imply?

When someone says, I barely understand that. Does he mean: He almost doesn't understand [which means he understands a bit] He almost understands [which means he doesn't understand] ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

“Down for” something vs. “Up for” something? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between someone saying they're "down for" something as opposed to being "up for" something? For example: I'm totally up for ice cream tonight! vs. I'm totally down ...
-1
votes
2answers
128 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
0
votes
3answers
191 views

“Currently the environment is so contaminated” vs. “the environment is currently so contaminated”

Currently the environment is so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. The environment is currently so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. Are both sentences ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
1
vote
3answers
175 views

“His words reached her nicely”

Someone told me I can't say, someone's words reached someone else nicely. For example: "His/your words reached me nicely" Is that true?
0
votes
1answer
10k views

“Totally agree” and “completely agree”

What is the difference between totally agree and completely agree? In other words, what is the difference in meaning between totally and completely in such combinations in conversations?
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Any difference between “Are you done?” and “Are you done yet?”

I see people in movies saying Are you done? and Are you done yet? And I wonder what that the addition of yet might mean or suggest in the second version which is absent in the first ...
1
vote
4answers
214 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
9
votes
2answers
4k views

Meaning of “excited much”, “stalker much”

What does 'excited much' or 'stalker much' mean exactly, and which context are they used in? I don't get the usage of much after a noun or adjective. I often see this construction in comments, for ...
4
votes
6answers
7k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
2
votes
0answers
3k views

For ever and forever [closed]

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
4
votes
2answers
162 views

The adverb “away” for continuity or repetitiveness

I would like to ask about the adverbial particle "away" meaning continuity or repetitiveness (i.e. not a location, a distance, a change of position etc.). When used with some atelic verbs, the ...
0
votes
2answers
514 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
4
votes
1answer
5k views

“Lately” and “recently” in Present Perfect

If I use Present Perfect Progressive and Present Perfect with an expression of unfinished time, it implies that the action is continuing. But what about recently and lately — when used with ...
3
votes
1answer
248 views

Does it make sense to end this sentence with “manually”

This sentence: Verify that the table includes the configured values manually. Is it the same as saying: Manually verify that the table includes the configured values. or the same as: ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is there any difference between “stoop down” and “stoop”?

According to Longman, they are the same, but I wonder if this is correct or if so, which one is more common. For example: Dave stooped down to tie his shoes. Dave stooped to tie his shoes. ...
-1
votes
3answers
79 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “so much” and “quite so much”?

I was told that "so much" is more emphatic than "quite so much", but I am not sure. Could you explain the difference between the following pairs of sentences? Don't put so much emphasis on that ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
0
votes
3answers
245 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
-1
votes
1answer
139 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
0
votes
1answer
171 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
3
votes
1answer
262 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
3
votes
3answers
654 views

What does the title “Whose line is it anyway?” mean?

Whose line is it anyway? is a comedy show in which participants are given a theme and they are supposed to come up with an act according to the theme given to them. According to Oxford Dictionary, ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Does “more or less” mean “almost”? [closed]

I checked out its meaning on the web and the common one I have found is "speaking imprecisely", but instinctively I thought it would be like "almost", for example: The task assigned is more or ...
0
votes
3answers
6k views

'of yet' and 'as of yet'

Can ‘of yet’ be used with the same meaning of ‘as of yet’? For example: Most importantly, he’s found footprints of dinosaurs that we haven’t found bones of yet. Does this mean the same thing as ...
5
votes
6answers
4k views

“Hardly” vs. “barely”

I'm from Germany and in German both translate to the same word (kaum). I'd like to know the difference between these two words, hardly and barely.
2
votes
2answers
483 views

Plastic or rubber stretched too much is (hardly/strongly) stretched?

If you want to describe a stretched plastic cable, would you say that it was hardly stretched or strongly stretched?
1
vote
1answer
174 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A ...
-2
votes
2answers
836 views

Exact definition of “vehemently” [closed]

My work mates and I are arguing about this term since none of us can comprehend its exact definition. Can I use the expression "I have been struggling vehemently to get this email sent since last ...
4
votes
3answers
92 views

“Really” modification problems

I can read a French newspaper with the aid of a dictionary, but I cannot speak the language or understand it when spoken. So I do not really know French. Some people say that really modifies know; ...
11
votes
3answers
863 views

Does the word “apparently” imply that I personally do or don't believe the statement following it?

When I say "Apparently, xyz", does that imply one of the following, and if so, which one? From observation, I believe xyz to be true, but I leave open the possibility that I might be wrong. I ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Usage of “already” and “yet”

I want to know the difference between already and yet in this example: I was surprised that they had __ to decide what to do. My answer on this question was already and my teacher marked it as ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

“I remember the day where” vs. “I remember the day when”

What is the difference between "I remember the day where..." and "I remember the day when..."? I think both are used in both written and spoken English. Can we say that "when" makes more sense when ...
6
votes
1answer
193 views

Placement of “just” in “we just need minified and concatenated files” [closed]

I was talking to my client. I wanted to convey that "we need the minified type of files and the concatenated type of files; nothing other than that". I quickly wrote this: we just need minified ...
15
votes
3answers
795 views

How do you tell if synonyms of “almost” default to meaning “less than”?

Having just had a chat with Em1, I noticed that some words or phrases that mean almost will mean less than when used alone, and other synonyms will mean greater than. For example, nearly and close to ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
3
votes
2answers
845 views

Is this correct: “Of [something] I have but none”?

This might be a pretty weird question, given that I'm using awkward grammar. Take into account that I'm trying to play with the language. The question is, would the following be correct? Of milk ...
14
votes
5answers
11k views

“Eventually” vs. “finally”

What is the difference between finally and eventually? He eventually escaped and made his way back to England. He finally escaped and made his way back to England.
1
vote
3answers
956 views

Use of “ever” instead of “more and more” [closed]

I wonder if I can use "ever" in place of "more and more". For example, do the following two sentences have the same meaning? Software is getting more and more complex. Software is getting ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

“Appointed as” or just “appointed”?

Is it more correct to say a) John was appointed as manager of ACME. or b) John was appointed manager of ACME. Or are they interchangeable?
12
votes
6answers
128k views

Difference between “supposedly” and “supposably”

What is the difference between supposedly and supposably? Both are real words but seem to have confusingly similar definitions. Supposably: Capable of being supposed : conceivable ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

“Always” vs. “forever”

What is the difference between always and forever? Are they synonyms used in different contexts or can they be used interchangeably?