1
vote
1answer
71 views

A Question on Parallelism

Sample sentence: "With three days remaining in the term, Mitzy started doing research, creating an outline, and wrote a rough draft." In this case, is "doing" a verb in parallel with "creating" but ...
-2
votes
1answer
57 views

Double Adverb Use e.g. *equally shockingly* [closed]

Yesterday, my biology instructor said (I'm paraphrasing here): "Shockingly, this cell does blah blah blah, and equally shockingly, the cell blah blah blah." Is this proper grammar (I speak American ...
2
votes
0answers
97 views

Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
0
votes
4answers
85 views

The correct positioning of a sentence adverb in a sentence [duplicate]

Three days? I think that it is not simply enough time. Three days? I think that it is simply not enough time What rule of grammar informs acceptable word order in this case?
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Where to put the adverb in passive sentences?

While writing another question on this site, I was uncertain about placement of adverbs in passive sentences. It shouldn't frequently be used in the context of immaterial things. It shouldn't ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Order of words in sentence

I am asked the following the question: Question: Why are your results important? Answer: For segmenting and classifying a stream of documents dynamically without a fixed training ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

What principle guides word combinations with “almost”?

I am trying to explain to non-native speakers how to use "almost." I can't formulate (a) rule(s) to follow with regard to nouns/pronouns. So far, my only ideas are that almost can be collocated only ...
3
votes
1answer
184 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
0
votes
1answer
186 views

Adverb position problems

I am confused about adverbs that can be placed in front of the verb as in: He quickly reads a book. And can be used at the end of the sentence as in: He works hardly Can I mix them as: ...
5
votes
1answer
156 views

Use of an ~ing form with another verb

I'm not sure how to describe the use of the bolded words in the following cases: Pete is happy singing a song Anna talked screaming Mike entered the room screaming and laughing Is it ...
2
votes
2answers
365 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
1
vote
4answers
77 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Are hyphens needed in a noun-phrase that precedes 'manner'? [duplicate]

I sometimes use "manner" to use noun-phrases as adverbs, like "in the manner of a vigilant watchdog". If I reverse the order, does the noun phrase then have to be hypenated? Like so: "in a ...
1
vote
2answers
800 views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
0
votes
1answer
315 views

Positive and negative clause comparison in the same sentence

What is the right way to perform a positive and a negative adverb comparison in the beginning of the sentence? As an example, which of the following ways is correct: Similarly to yesterday, and ...
3
votes
4answers
4k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
11
votes
5answers
1k views

“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
0
votes
2answers
149 views

Placement of 'always'

Which of the following is the most appropriate usage "You have to be always logical in your analysis." "You always have to be logical in your analysis." "You have to be logical in your ...
1
vote
2answers
993 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
3
votes
2answers
516 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
-2
votes
3answers
6k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
4
votes
1answer
217 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Can you say “he too wanted to do it” or is it better to say “he wanted to do it too”?

English is not my mother tonge and I had this argument with a friend the other day. I think that putting the "too" after the subject instead of at the end of the sentence is not correct but he ...
1
vote
1answer
288 views

How to best explain the use of best?

I've been asked to explain the use of best in the phrase "humans have found how best to live together" other than saying its an adverb I'm stumped, could someone wiser help me out.
-1
votes
2answers
308 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
2
votes
0answers
3k views

For ever and forever [closed]

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
0
votes
1answer
452 views

Is downtown an adverb of place? [duplicate]

What is the explanation for why we say "I'm going downtown" instead of "I'm going to downtown?"
0
votes
1answer
450 views

Can “above” be used as an adjective? [duplicate]

I've read in some English grammar books that the word above can only act as an adverb. It can never be used as an adjective in any context. For example: 1) The above example explains it well. ...
-1
votes
2answers
150 views

Using “meantime” as an adjective

Does it make sense to say: Please consider this email as a meantime brief report. If yes, why? and if no, how can it be fixed? Edit By the above sentence, I want to say that this email is not ...
1
vote
0answers
277 views

Why does a negative adverbial phrase trigger inversion? [duplicate]

When a negative adverb (or adverbial phrase) is placed at the beginning of a sentence, we exchange the normal placement of subject and verb. Why is that?
1
vote
1answer
121 views

With + adverb structure

The strange example makes me confused - with + adverb : "Red items need dealing with immediately after the process..." How correct and common of this structure?
0
votes
3answers
309 views

Do adverbs only describe verbs?

Egypt and Tunisia have both taken steps to form a new government after the overthrow of Mubarak and Ben Ali respectively. In this context, does respectively describe the steps that have been ...
1
vote
2answers
555 views

Is it possible to say ' your choice *for* something' when you mean 'your choice *of* something'?

I'm correcting a document and several people that co-wrote it seem to agree that 'my choice for' seems to be synonymous to 'my choice of', in the signification of me having chosen something and ...
17
votes
3answers
786 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
2
votes
2answers
984 views

In the sentence “My house is down the street”, which word does the adverb “down” modify?

My house is down the street. Does the adverb down modify is, or street?
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Adverb vs. direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What exactly is an “adverb”? Consider the following sentences: She went home. He swam yesterday. Are the words "home" and "yesterday" adverbs or direct ...
2
votes
4answers
868 views

Is this usage of “inside” correct?

This text is taken from a children's reader. It's about some children who find a doll house that is an exact reproduction of their home. Biff opened the little house. Everyone looked inside. "It ...
42
votes
7answers
3k views

What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
5
votes
4answers
629 views

“Weekdays” used as an adverb

I found a sentence in Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The bookstore opens weekdays from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. . How do we understand the structure of ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

“I remember the day where” vs. “I remember the day when”

What is the difference between "I remember the day where..." and "I remember the day when..."? I think both are used in both written and spoken English. Can we say that "when" makes more sense when ...
0
votes
2answers
113 views

How to combine “a book about X” with “people are interested in how X works”? [closed]

I would like to know how to correctly combine the sentence 1. with the sentence 2. People are interested in how these algorithms work. I am writing a book about algorithms... [here I need to ...
6
votes
3answers
359 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

“Appointed as” or just “appointed”?

Is it more correct to say a) John was appointed as manager of ACME. or b) John was appointed manager of ACME. Or are they interchangeable?
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Inversion in “only [adverb] have they”

I have seen this construction quite often: Online ads have been around since the dawn of the Web, but only in recent years have they become the rapturous life dream of Silicon Valley. What ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “I'll when” proper form? [closed]

A friend of mine keeps using a contraction like this and I keep correcting him by asking "I'll what?". He doesn't get it though, and no matter how much I try to explain it doesn't seem to sink in. ...
1
vote
2answers
13k views

How to use the words ending with “-ly”?

First question: in the grammar world, where do the -ly ended words belong? Second question: how to use them correctly? Rarely (oops!), if ever, I get myself using -ly ended words in my writing. I'm ...