1
vote
2answers
32 views

Adjective request for fast, lightweightness and multitasking [closed]

I am deciding some product name which has characteristics like Fast and lightweight and multitasking. Please suggest some name which includes these meaning or bird or animal which has such qualities. ...
5
votes
5answers
297 views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
0
votes
1answer
83 views

“Beautiful” or “beautifully” [closed]

Should I say You look beautifully today or You look beautiful today? In my opinion, the first form is correct because beautifully describes the verb and not the noun. Thus, I should use the beautiful ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Is there a difference between “good” and “well” when they are connected to subject via linking verb? [duplicate]

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, David M, RyeɃreḁd, Brian Hooper, tchrist This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your ...
1
vote
3answers
87 views

Need a word for "Should not have happened' with a negative context

I'm looking for a word to mean "should not have happened." I'm trying to relate this situation; two paths - one positive, one negative - with the same end result, and the negative path was taken. ...
0
votes
2answers
70 views

Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?

Do native speakers use like as an adjective? Is it a preferred usage?
1
vote
2answers
157 views

We say entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, what is the verb?

For the word entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, I would like to know the corresponding verb, i.e the action of doing entrepreneurship, i.e the verb that should fit in the next sentence : To be a good ...
2
votes
2answers
131 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
17
votes
8answers
3k views

What does 'infinitesimally small' mean?

If infinite is the opposite of infinitesimal, and small is the opposite of large, then: infinitely large ---------- Means "very large" infinitely small --------- Means "very small" infinitesimally ...
0
votes
3answers
89 views

Is “alone” an adverb in “I was sitting alone”?

Is the sentence "I was sitting alone." correct? And if so, is "alone" an adverb? Are there other examples of adjectives being used as adverbs without modification?
1
vote
4answers
61 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
0
votes
4answers
67 views

Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
-1
votes
2answers
61 views

Why isn't “safely disposing” written as “safe disposing” instead?

The cost of safely disposing of the toxic chemicals is approximately five times what the company paid to purchase them. The -ing and of seem indicate that "disposing" is a noun, and since ...
0
votes
2answers
276 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Adverb for “friendly” [duplicate]

Some adjectives already end in -ly, e.g. friendly, lovely, silly, lonely. How do I form the corresponding adverb? For example: Sara is a friendly girl. She talks to me [adverb corresponding to ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
1
vote
2answers
599 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
5
votes
3answers
165 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
-2
votes
3answers
4k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
0
votes
2answers
286 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
0
votes
3answers
121 views

Do I use adjective forms of concurrent and consecutive?

Should this passage use the adjectival or adverbial forms of concurrent and consecutive? The trial court also sentenced the defendant to five life sentences (with parole) and five 15-year ...
-1
votes
2answers
257 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
1
vote
1answer
532 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
0
votes
1answer
322 views

Can “above” be used as an adjective? [duplicate]

I've read in some English grammar books that the word above can only act as an adverb. It can never be used as an adjective in any context. For example: 1) The above example explains it well. ...
1
vote
2answers
174 views

What role does 'in' take in this sentence?

Father: “It may not be exactly the car you want but..” Daughter: “It’ll be rubbish, some old wreck that I’ll look totally stupid in.” (BBC, The Archers, 2013-04-26 Friday, 8’55”~9’01”) Does ...
-1
votes
2answers
119 views

Using “meantime” as an adjective

Does it make sense to say: Please consider this email as a meantime brief report. If yes, why? and if no, how can it be fixed? Edit By the above sentence, I want to say that this email is not ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
2
votes
3answers
512 views

Four-word phrase stress

I'm interested to learn why the following four-word phrases have stress on different words. "Little Red Riding Hood" (stress is on little and riding) "Infamous National Rifle Association" ...
0
votes
3answers
205 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
-2
votes
1answer
386 views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
0
votes
1answer
147 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Is this adjective or adverbial?

When are you getting the train back to Adelaide? Is the phrase back to Adelaide an adjective phrase that modifies the train or adverbial to are getting?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Fairly quick” vs. “fairly quickly” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”? If I were to write a sentence like: I completed the task fairly quickly. Is it correct, or would fairly quick be ...
12
votes
5answers
456 views

The use of “real” in the following cases [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Real quick question If you listen real close... Can you swing by real quick... Sentences like the above two are what I often hear in daily life. If I didn't ...
-1
votes
1answer
186 views

Adverb of “gullible” [closed]

What is the adverb form of gullible? I tried using gullibly but it apparently isn't a word. Is it one of those adjectives that simply don't have an adequate adverb?
3
votes
3answers
660 views

Is “five-yearly” an acceptable usage of an adverb of manner in British English?

Today's BBC News web page has this headline: New era of five-yearly doctor checks starts There's a word that means "five-yearly": quinquennial. It's probably too long for headline writers and ...
4
votes
2answers
553 views

Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?

Soul-crushingly bad; heartbreakingly sad; bone-crunchingly violent; etc. I swear I have seen it done, but I am not sure whether it's proper grammar or not. Thanks!
3
votes
3answers
531 views

Alternative phrase to “highly paid job”

James: I make 10000 USD a month. Alice: Wow, you have a highly paid job. Is the phrase “highly paid job” correct? I think yes, but also wish to ask the native speakers here. I assume that ...
8
votes
2answers
352 views

Why “buy things secondhand,“ not “buy secondhand things”?

I saw the word ‘secondhand’ come after ‘things’ in the lead copy of July 17 Time magazine’s article, titled “10 Things You Should Be Buying Used”, as follows. Buying things secondhand can save a ...
3
votes
2answers
840 views

Is “ultimated” a word? [closed]

Is "ultimated" a valid word? For example: Range requests were originally proposed by Ari Luotonen and John Franks, using an extension to the URL syntax instead of a separate header field. ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

“Above”/“below” before/after a noun

I have seen sentences similar to the following: (1) See the reference above. (2) See the reference below. And, (3) See the above reference. But not, (4) See the below reference. ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Real quick question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “real” be used as an adverb to describe an adjective? Let me just ask you something real quick. Is my previous sentence wrong? Must the real part be "really"? Some ...
1
vote
3answers
397 views

Adjective & Adverbial forms of “Conspiracy” [closed]

I tried looking up its synonyms (plot, scheme) and then their adjectives, but they didn't quite cut it. Any word that can be used as its adjective and adverb? The place that I would like to use it ...
1
vote
1answer
925 views

“ 'Such' amount” or “ 'such an' amount”?

Is there any difference between them!? If you google both: 1 and 2, the amount of retrieved results are very similar. I'd like to know if there's any (grammar) rule that makes it clear when to use an ...
0
votes
2answers
266 views

“New diagnosed” vs. “newly diagnosed” [closed]

Which one of the following is correct to use? New diagnosed cases. Newly diagnosed cases.
0
votes
0answers
50 views

The use of “bad” vs the use of “badly.” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” Which of the following is more grammatically correct? I feel bad for her. or I feel ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“overly confident” vs “over confident”

I hear or read both phrases regularly, and they seem to have the same meaning to me. But do they have different meanings? Or is “overly confident” even grammatically correct?
1
vote
1answer
424 views

Using “subject to” with a verb other than “to be”

Is it possible to use subject to with a verb other than to be? for example: The self-image is subject to changes. (Obviously OK) Being bound to our self-image we react subject to behavior ...