An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
7 views

“However difficult something is, …” or “However difficult something may/might be, …” ?

Does it make sense to follow an adjective phrase such as "however difficult" with the modal auxiliaries "may/might"? Isn't it a bit pleonastic, since "however" already contains the idea of either ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
0
votes
4answers
69 views

“Continuously” vs “continually”: What's the difference? [on hold]

What's the difference in the usage of these two adverbs continuously and continually? Here are some examples: a) She was told off for continually being late. b) It rained continuously for ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

An example when adverbials can exchange positions

I am searching two short (4-5 word) grammatical sentences that have two adverbials adv1 and adv2 inside, and in sentence A, adv1 is applied to VP and than adv2, but in sentence B the order is ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Looking for a couple of comprehensive reference books: adverbs, rudimentary syntax, and English Media Arts focusing on readers theater [on hold]

Looking for a few comprehensive reference books: one examining adverbs, rudimentary syntax, and another focusing on readers theater. I have a very comprehensive book on prepositions, "The Ins and Outs ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Position(s) of 'notwithstanding' as an adverb

Foreword: I wish to understand 'notwithstanding', based on the root withstand; so would all feedback please analogise, invoke and refer back to withstand as much as possible? Hereafter, suppose that ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

“I don't agree totally” vs. “I don't totally agree” vs. “I totally don't agree”

What is the difference between the following? I don't agree with him totally. I don't totally agree with him. I totally don't agree with him. I'm puzzled at the meaning of negative ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What is the proper construction of this comparative?

This sentence appeared in a recent New Yorker article written by the copy chief there: I find it easier to use the serial comma consistently rather than stop every time I come to a series and ...
1
vote
1answer
21 views

Adverbial Form of “Supplementary” [closed]

Does the word "supplementary" have an adverbial form? My first instinct is the word "supplementarily," but as far as I can tell that isn't a word.
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Arguably- does the adverb carries “what I am saying is unarguable” connotation [duplicate]

Arguably- “I’m a little confused about the usage of this word. "Roger Federer is arguably the best tennis player ever. This is what I heard in a conversation. My point is does the statement ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

What is the difference between “because” and “for”? [closed]

Is there any substantial difference in the usage of "because"and "for"in a sentence/
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate? [closed]

Imagine that adverbs were banned from the English language, and we had to replace them all with their cognate adjectives. Language would begin to sound bad to our ears that are attuned to the ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Is it ok to write “very huge” in this context? [duplicate]

I think it is ok to write "very huge" in a context like this (although "very" is a bit redundant here): This is a very huge map. However, the following sounds strange to me: This map is very ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Can I be “friendfully yours” [closed]

friendly (advs). : Used to mean 'in a friendly manner. I am wondering if "friendfully" was/is in standard usage and would I sound primitive or ungrammatical if I dare write "friendfully yours" ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

We did it at exactly the right time vs We did it at the exactly right time.

I know the first example is correct and I'm pretty sure the second is incorrect, but I wonder why. So, we can say "I saw an extremely angry dog", but not "I saw extremely an angry dog." When do we ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

can someone tell me if i am right in identifying the odd word out from these group of words? [closed]

a) taken WENT seen forgotten--- because the rest are verbs b) bright EARLY good some------because the rest are adjectives ??? c) NEVER but unless ...
1
vote
5answers
61 views

Ambiguity with adverbs when using the word “or”

If you take the sentence "Bob will run or walk fast." how is the ambiguity resolved between the following two meanings? Bob will either run fast or he will walk fast. Bob will either ...
2
votes
3answers
100 views

“completely” usage confusion

As I know, verbs are followed by adverbs. So, which is true? "She stands there completely expressionlessly" Or "she stands there completely expressionless" Though I think the second one is likely to ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
2
votes
3answers
81 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

The variations of in/for the last few days

1.I was not able to gain access to Internet in last a few days. 2.I was not able to gain access to Internet last a few days. 3.I was not able to gain access to Internet in a few days. ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

Is “per se” used more in formal or informal situations?

What is the formality level of "per se"?
0
votes
2answers
57 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
15
votes
3answers
2k views

“Sometimes”, “oftentimes” — is there a -times word for “very rarely”?

If something happens sometimes, it happens occasionally. If something happens oftentimes, it happens often. Is there an equivalent word for something happening very rarely?
4
votes
1answer
73 views

True meaning of these 'adverbials'

Recently I had a discussion with someone and the following examples were brought up. I was told that I was wrong, but as a native speaker I don't think any of my explanations of the meaning were ...
14
votes
4answers
690 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense? [closed]

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

Usage of adverbs like reasonably, practically, essentially, ridiculously, basically

I have recently noticed a phenomenon in English, that seems quite common. The phenomenon is regarding the usage of certain adverbs: Practically should mean in a practical manner. But it is often ...
0
votes
4answers
94 views

Is there an adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?

“Still” means “in the past and now”: “It is still raining.” Is there an English adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?
1
vote
2answers
118 views

Using adjectives after verbs?

In a lot of sentences when speaking people use adjectives after verbs. In some examples it sounds right, however, and I was wondering if such uses were valid in formal writing. The only example I ...
2
votes
1answer
117 views

Is “Tomorrow, I will buy it” correct? [closed]

My brother and I are having a discussion, whether it is grammatically correct (or any native speaker would ever say a sentence): Tomorrow, I will buy it. I think it is not correct, it strikes me ...
2
votes
3answers
87 views

“This is particularly since…”

Recently I came across this sentence: [... allegations that such information had been used elsewhere] This is particularly since you were given access to the information. I have been trying to ...
5
votes
1answer
55 views

To Witness Something of Such Beauty

There is a word used in English but from Italian (I think) which has the following meaning: To witness something or someone of such profound beauty that you are compelled to sing aloud in ...
7
votes
1answer
276 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
2
votes
2answers
79 views

Replacement for “narrowly missed?”

I am trying to remove adverbs from my writing. My grant proposal narrowly missed the funding threshold. I want to replace the phrase "narrowly missed" or change the whole sentence but still ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Capital letter after adverb [closed]

In sentences like: Also, it provides ... Also, It provides ... is it allowed to place It (with a capital I) instead of it after the adverb Also?
-2
votes
1answer
50 views

Is “originally first” a grammar error?

I understand that the phrase "originally first" is repetitive, but is it a grammatical error? For more context, the phrase appeared in the following sentence which was marked wrong for repetition. ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

How to choose between “spatial” or “spatially”?

I'm writing my thesis and I need help with the title, here it is: Improved seam merging for temporally and spatially video resizing with structure and motion preservation I am not sure about the ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Can I wish someone on new home as “ my cordial wishes to your family on new home” [closed]

I would like to wish my boss on her new home. Is the below statement correct? My cordial wishes to your family on new home
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Use of “respectively” in “both these localities are on the banks, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream”

Both these source localities are on the banks of the Rhine, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream from Bonn. In the above sentence, is respectively needed, and if so, is it properly used?
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Is it correct to say “more sufficient”?

I suggest that the maintenance period be from 12:30 to 2:30 so that we can have more sufficient time to handle if any unexpected problems occur. Is it correct to say more sufficient?
2
votes
3answers
108 views

“Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”

I'm editing a short movie. In the title screens, after the production company is listed, there needs to be a play on the common "Proudly Presents" text. It is with some chagrin that the production ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

“in danger”: an adverb or an adjective?

Is the expression "in danger" an adverb or an adjective? Why?
2
votes
1answer
48 views

In theory or theoretically: use of adverbs

Which form is more correct or more readable for writing a scientific article: In theory D is constant when q tends to infinity. or Theoretically D is constant when q tends to infinity. Thanks
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Commas with conjunctive adverbs [closed]

Which is correct? Certainly that was a good thing. or, Certainly, that was a good thing.
1
vote
2answers
83 views

I know this sentence is wrong but

I'm trying to explain to the person who wrote it, and to myself, why it is wrong. Dan plays the drums as vindictively as though they’d personally insulted him. The "as adverbially as though" is ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

the X event after next…Th

Is it grammatically correct to say "at the steering committee meeting after next"? The idea is that there are meetings every two weeks, but the intention is for something to be presented not at the ...