An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Use of the adverb first in conjunction with then

Are the use and the positions of the adverbs first and then correct in the following two sentences? We prove, first, two preliminary properties, and, then, the whole theorem. We first show ...
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38 views

Use and position of the adverb “instead” when introducing the second of two items

Is the use of the adverb instead appropriate, and correct, in the last of the following three sentences? The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic ...
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70 views

Hopefully vs Presumably [duplicate]

Background hopefully (adverb): in a hopeful manner Presumably (adverb): used to convey that what is asserted is very likely though not known for certain. While fully acknowledging, as noted in the ...
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3answers
50 views

Is it possible to do something both “cleverly” and “unknowingly” at same time?

I saw the sentence below in a New York Times article, and wonder -- is it possible? There is a possibility that dogs cleverly and unknowingly utilized a natural system meant for bonding a parent ...
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42 views

Should I say “rules of here” or “rules here”?

For example, should I ask "Do you know the rules of here?" or "... the rules here?" I believe the latter is correct but I did see some people use the former, got confused :-(
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54 views

Preposition “over” vs Adverb “over”

annual growth of [over 7 percent] What do you think the part of "over" is? Is "over" considered the preposition of the object "7 percent"? over [7 percent] Or, is "over" considered ...
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101 views

“how quicker” vs. “how much quicker”

I'm trying to settle a debate with my girlfriend. She says "how quicker" is incorrect and you should always use "how much quicker". Which of these is [more?] correct? See how quicker the cars ...
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22 views

Punctuating sentences with multiple adverb forms

What is generally considered the correct way to punctuate multiple adverb forms in a sentence? E.g., She stood discreetly, close to a bus stop, across the street from the entrance of a modern office ...
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21 views

Is there a form and/or synonym of the gerund “spelling” that can be put into an adverb position such as that of “grammatically”?

That is, how would I go about converting the word "spelling" (as in the spelling of a word) to an adverb that actually sounds right in the blank of "_____-inept"? I'm pretty sure "spellingly" isn't a ...
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21 views

“Come home.” — other adverbs which refer to the noun versions of themselves?

In the phrase Come home. the word 'home' is playing the role of adverb, and essentially means 'to or towards home'. It is interesting to me that it has a rather recursive definition; are there ...
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23 views

Which is correct: to 'throw hard' or 'throw fast'? [closed]

Which is the correct adverb? Or can both be used? If so, how should one decide which one to use?
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2answers
80 views

Could the “pseudo” adverbial phrases modify the real adverbial phrases?

1)A woman fell 50 feet down a cliff. 2)The project was finished 10 days ahead of the schedule. 3)Emma is 10 years older than Sophie. 4)I finished the project 10 days ago. 1)50 feet/10 days/10 ...
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31 views

is there a special term for using “very” in combination with adverby which can only be either/or [closed]

Sometimes people use the word "very" in combination with adverbs which can only be either/or. for instance: "the floor is very wet". This may not be the best example, but the floor can either be wet ...
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1answer
17 views

Adverb location according to auxiliary verb

Even though there are examples of location of adverb related to auxiliary verb, I am still doubtful about where to put the adverb in this particular example. I need to make a very formal sentence: ...
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1answer
34 views

using amidst in mathematic [closed]

I use a very formal writing style. If I want to say that I calculate a function between 5 times between each two points, can I use amid these ways? The function f(t) is calculated 5 times amidst ...
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37 views

word for widestly (adverb of widest)

I am going to paraphrase this sentence: It is one of the mostly used methods in .... and I want to replace mostly with widest, but it is an adjective, not an adverb: It is one of the ...
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0answers
36 views

Adverb Form of “Fallible” [closed]

I would like to correctly use an adverb form of "fallacy." Which of these words is correct - fallibly or fallaciously - in this example sentence? "My argument is [insert word here] idiotic." I ...
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49 views

Position of adverb with respect to the adjective it modifies [closed]

The arm was so badly injured (a) that he must have (b) it amputated (c). Which part of this sentence has an error? Should it be "The arm was injured so badly." Is that right?
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32 views

A question on 'full' Vs 'fully', both as 'adverbs'

In order to modify an adjective or adverb, we use an adverb in English, as in "completely insane" or "It went completely out of hand". Now 'full', though mainly used as an adjective, occurs in English ...
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62 views

Why not 'somewhy'?

When I originally wrote this ELL question, I used 'somewhy' instead of 'for some reason' for want of concision. Only afterwards, a user kindly advised that 'somewhy' obsolesced. But why? Google led ...
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1answer
36 views

Proper use of the word 'Imperatively'

What are the proper uses of the word 'imperatively'? Does this sentence use the word correctly? "We are all an imperatively significant pixel, part of the ever intricate mosaic of life."
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2answers
49 views

Frequently Vs Frequent /Adverb form or Adjective form /

So normally adjectives like (frequent) modify a noun or a pronoun, whereas adverbs like (frequently) modify verbs or adjectives However, In this sentence both options seemd fine to me but i ...
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36 views

“nearby” vs “near to”

He went fishing in the creek nearby the grocery store. He went fishing in the creek near by the grocery store. He went fishing in the creek near to the grocery store. Could anyone ...
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3answers
93 views

Are adverbs frowned upon in proper English (academic writing)?

I understand that "proper English" is vague, but what I mean is, are adverbs to be avoided in scholarly writing? For example, let's say that I am wanting to publish an article in scholarly magazine ...
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2answers
57 views

Is “also was” a correct construction? [duplicate]

I had an editor who was very picky about the use of the adverb "also" used with the past tense of "to be." According to her, there was a difference between "was also" and "also was." For example: to ...
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57 views

How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?

I'm trying to phrase a sentence where I want to refer to the god and the devil/satan by using a combination of pronouns and adverbs rather than their names or nouns such as "good/evil", "divine power" ...
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52 views

Does “unexpectedly” apply to one or both following verb phrases?

We're having a discussion in a forum on rulings in duplicate bridge. In duplicate bridge, each partnership has their own set of bidding system agreements, and there are regulations that specify that ...
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88 views

Why do people say “Go down this road” or “Go down this corridor” instead of saying “Go straight” [closed]

I was wondering, when giving directions, is it correct to say "go straight" instead of "go down"? Does down and straight in the context of giving directions mean the same thing?
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30 views

Hyphenation of a multiple adverb-past participle phrase

I am editing a research article, and I came across a phrase that I am having some trouble hyphenating: "the detoxification of both endogenous and exogenous derived acetaldehyde." My thought is that ...
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2answers
358 views

Correct or correctly: “I got them all correct / correctly”?

I just answered a battery of test questions, and posted the following comment: "I got them all correctly." Should I have said "I got them all correct."?
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32 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

What is the difference between "not a bit" and "not one bit"? I thought they both have the same meaning, but I was wondering if there could be a slight difference meaning between those phrases. For ...
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2answers
94 views

Is there an unkindly way to say thank you? [duplicate]

Are you not already being kind by saying thank you to begin with? I read the comments on this site What's the deal with thank you kindly?, and I guess that I am still pretty confused as to the ...
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1answer
136 views

easier, more easily, or easy [duplicate]

I'm a programmer and I'm combing through some code and entering comments to help other developers. I wrote the following sentence and got confused by the (possibly) dangling verb. I've spared you the ...
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67 views

Omitted words in a sentence [duplicate]

Here is an excerpt from Steve Job's speech. "...On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind __________ you might find yourself walking along if ...
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102 views

Difference between near, nearby and close

Could you tell me a ( near - nearby - close ) pharmacy? I live ( near - nearby - close ) to the bank. Don't leave. I'm (near - nearby - close ). Do you think that they ...
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60 views

usage of adverb never [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "We had a fight and never spoke again". I think the verb "spoke" should be either in simple present or present perfect, shouldn't it?
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32 views

Punch him good? [duplicate]

I some time ago saw some sentences, "Punch him good", "You punch really good". I assume, that good works as adverb and means well. Upon assuming, I got a question: How has the word good become to mean ...
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1answer
73 views

Fail fast versus fail faster [closed]

Wow, I had no idea that people responding to this post would be so "nit picky"!!! I just wanted an answer on what the proper form of the phrase "fail fast" to use? Adverbs do not need to end in -ly, ...
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58 views

Prediction / Foreshadowing - Adverb

What is a way to say "as you _____ mentioned" where _____ is meant to convey that the person correctly predicted / foreshadowed your response?
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160 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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1answer
47 views

What does “independent” bind to in this sentence? [closed]

Which of the following two sentences is correct? A is valid independent of B. A is valid independently of B. In other words, does independent bind to "are" or "valid"? I tend towards the first ...
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20 views

“However difficult something is, …” or “However difficult something may/might be, …” ? [duplicate]

Does it make sense to follow an adjective phrase such as "however difficult" with the modal auxiliaries "may/might"? Isn't it a bit pleonastic, since "however" already contains the idea of either ...
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1answer
54 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
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4answers
102 views

“Continuously” vs “continually”: What's the difference? [closed]

What's the difference in the usage of these two adverbs continuously and continually? Here are some examples: a) She was told off for continually being late. b) It rained continuously for ...
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2answers
50 views

An example when adverbials can exchange positions

I am searching two short (4-5 word) grammatical sentences that have two adverbials adv1 and adv2 inside, and in sentence A, adv1 is applied to VP and than adv2, but in sentence B the order is ...
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36 views

Position(s) of 'notwithstanding' as an adverb

Foreword: I wish to understand 'notwithstanding', based on the root withstand; so would all feedback please analogise, invoke and refer back to withstand as much as possible? Hereafter, suppose that ...
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105 views

“I don't agree totally” vs. “I don't totally agree” vs. “I totally don't agree”

What is the difference between the following? I don't agree with him totally. I don't totally agree with him. I totally don't agree with him. I'm puzzled at the meaning of negative ...
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2answers
59 views

What is the proper construction of this comparative?

This sentence appeared in a recent New Yorker article written by the copy chief there: I find it easier to use the serial comma consistently rather than stop every time I come to a series and ...
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25 views

Adverbial Form of “Supplementary” [closed]

Does the word "supplementary" have an adverbial form? My first instinct is the word "supplementarily," but as far as I can tell that isn't a word.
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37 views

Arguably- does the adverb carries “what I am saying is unarguable” connotation [duplicate]

Arguably- “I’m a little confused about the usage of this word. "Roger Federer is arguably the best tennis player ever. This is what I heard in a conversation. My point is does the statement ...