An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Instead of grammar using senteces

I want to know how use instead of in simple sentences. is this Example correct? For me, Computer uses instead of the mobile phone
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To explain! there [closed]

The medico went to the nearest village and (there) in the bazaar he found various kinds of meat and fish. What does "there" refer to?
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50 views

What does “over” mean in this question? [closed]

I'd like to know whether "over" is necessary or not in the following question: Do you want to come over for dinner tonight?
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34 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok ...
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Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand ...
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37 views

Adverb or adjective when used to describe an infinitive?

"To play basketball" is an infinitive phrase. An infinitive phrase is generally used as a noun. Is the word "professionally" as in "To play basketball professionally..." an adjective or an adverb? Is ...
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58 views

What's the correct adverb to go with “renovated”? [closed]

I've come across the following on billboards: "Newly renovated suites..." It's apparent that the intended meaning here is "recently" and so I believe that "newly" may not be appropriate to go with ...
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2answers
65 views

Past Participle as Adverb

I just read the following sentence from a German native speaker: We have to do this coordinated. I am also German native speaker, so this sentence sounds like a straight translation of Wir ...
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30 views

Using ‘later’ when the amount of time is a complex phrase

In sentences like ‘The speed 10 seconds later is 3 m/s’ the amount of time is easy to specify. But what can I do if it is a complex phrase? In particular, I should like to express v(t + dt) in words, ...
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24 views

Where is the right place for the adverb 'well' in a sentence?

I want to write: "I understand something." But I want add emphasis by including the adverb "well". Which is the right place for it? I well understand something. I understand well something. I ...
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41 views

Order of multiple adverbs

1) Нe went upstairs quietly last night. 2) Нe quietly went upstairs last night. What version is right? I can't find information about this issue.
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38 views

Conjunctive adverbs preceded by conjunctions

I've been under the impression that conjunctive adverbs needn't be preceded by a full-ish stop (e.g., a period or semicolon). I don't know where I got that idea, and consequently, as a lover of ...
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Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles

I have seen many rules about position of an adverbs with finite forms of verbs but I can't find the rule about where to place an adverb with nonfinitive verbs. For example which of the sentence sounds ...
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Why is 'X notwithstanding' more correct than 'notwithstanding X'?

Source: p 575, Garner's Modern American Usage (3 ed; 2009), by Bryan Garner: notwithstanding is a FORMAL WORD, used in the sense "despite," "in spite of," or "although." E.g., "Notwithstanding an ...
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37 views

Order of adverbs

Is there any specific rationale behind ordering similar adverbs? Clearly, I point out time adverbs, never and ever. I've found examples in which these two used in different orders. My mom will ...
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26 views

What should I say? Across or between camera views?

My question is regarding the usage of "across" and "between". I want to say that a person is viewed by one camera, then disappears and, after a while is sensed by a different cameras. I wrote ...
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61 views

Can adverbs be qualified as transitive/intransitive?

In my english lesson today i was told that "afterwards" is an intransitive adverb (I cannot write "afterwards this") while "after" is a transitive adverb. Is this distinction transitive/intransitive ...
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87 views

Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”? [duplicate]

I am studying for the SAT, and I learned just now that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: Hopefully, we will be able to complete the building before the rainy season sets in. ...
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583 views

However vs. how ever: one word or two?

I am writing a paper and stumbled upon this sentence of mine. "The output remained consistently poor however the data was/were analysed". "The output remained consistently poor how ever the ...
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118 views

“more than usual” vs. “more than usually”

Which sentence is correct? "I had more customers than usual." "I had more customers than usually." "More than usual" sounds pretty common, but "more than usually" seems more correct when I think ...
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155 views

“I weigh about 5 lbs.”

This stems from a discussion over on ELL which has moved beyond being useful to second-language learners. In short, consider the sentence: I weigh about 5 pounds. What part of speech is ...
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What part of speech is 'closer' functioning as in 'I moved closer'?

'I moved closer.' At face value, 'closer' seems to be acting like an adjective; however, I don't see anything in the sentence to which it can refer. A friend suggested that 'to move closer', 'to ...
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2answers
43 views

Difference between “be promoted soon” and “soon be promoted”?

You have done well and you will be promoted soon. You have done well and you will soon be promoted. What's the difference? Is one of them grammatically wrong? EDIT: I asked one of my ...
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103 views

“There is the man.” Is *there* an adverb or pronoun?

According to Dictionary.com there adverb in or at that place (opposed to here ): She is there now. pronoun (used to introduce a sentence or clause in which ...
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42 views

'Immediately' used not as an adverb, but as a conjunction

I'm sure that I've heard (not read) someone use the word immediately in a sentence in the same way that we would use "when" or "as soon as", and I would like to know if this is correct? Here's an ...
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90 views

“Here he comes”, “Here comes he” : The order of pronoun and verb in inversion

It's very common to say: "Here he comes." "Here comes the man." But what about: "Here comes he." "Here the man comes." Is there a rule about the order of noun and verb in ...
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26 views

Is the clause “where are you from” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

One of the most fundamental sentence from the English “phrasebook” that almost every beginner will learn is this sentence, using which one can ask another one’s nationality or country/region of ...
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129 views

Adverb position in “Listen carefully to what I say” [closed]

I've come across the phrase "Listen carefully to what I say" and I'm really not sure why carefully has gone in between listen and to. It doesn't happen with other verbs; you don't "switch carefully on ...
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56 views

-ly adverb at the beginning of the sentence

I once took a multiple choice exam where there was a section with all possible answers being made up of a single word, an -ly suffix adverb followed by a comma at the beginning of the sentence. ...
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Would “objectively necessary” convey that something is necessary as a matter of fact, regardless of opinions?

In Russian "objectively necessary" (literal translation) means necessary as a matter of fact, not as a matter of judgement. Like, e.g., the water is objectively necessary for plants to grow. Does ...
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49 views

What are the adverb for shabby and hardy? [closed]

What are the adverbs for shabby and hardy are, and what are their corresponding noun and adjective?
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64 views

Using “very” as a standalone answer

Assuming it is possible for "very" to occur naturally as a standalone answer, for example in 'Was the movie good?' 'Yes, very [good].' could it also be used to provide an answer to a ...
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30 views

Use of the adverb first in conjunction with then

Are the use and the positions of the adverbs first and then correct in the following two sentences? We prove, first, two preliminary properties, and, then, the whole theorem. We first show ...
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109 views

Use and position of the adverb “instead” when introducing the second of two items

Is the use of the adverb instead appropriate, and correct, in the last of the following three sentences? The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic ...
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116 views

Hopefully vs Presumably [duplicate]

Background hopefully (adverb): in a hopeful manner Presumably (adverb): used to convey that what is asserted is very likely though not known for certain. While fully acknowledging, as noted in the ...
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61 views

Is it possible to do something both “cleverly” and “unknowingly” at same time?

I saw the sentence below in a New York Times article, and wonder -- is it possible? There is a possibility that dogs cleverly and unknowingly utilized a natural system meant for bonding a parent ...
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53 views

Should I say “rules of here” or “rules here”?

For example, should I ask "Do you know the rules of here?" or "... the rules here?" I believe the latter is correct but I did see some people use the former, got confused :-(
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74 views

Preposition “over” vs Adverb “over”

annual growth of [over 7 percent] What do you think the part of "over" is? Is "over" considered the preposition of the object "7 percent"? over [7 percent] Or, is "over" considered ...
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116 views

“how quicker” vs. “how much quicker”

I'm trying to settle a debate with my girlfriend. She says "how quicker" is incorrect and you should always use "how much quicker". Which of these is [more?] correct? See how quicker the cars ...
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39 views

Punctuating sentences with multiple adverb forms

What is generally considered the correct way to punctuate multiple adverb forms in a sentence? E.g., She stood discreetly, close to a bus stop, across the street from the entrance of a modern office ...
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Is there a form and/or synonym of the gerund “spelling” that can be put into an adverb position such as that of “grammatically”?

That is, how would I go about converting the word "spelling" (as in the spelling of a word) to an adverb that actually sounds right in the blank of "_____-inept"? I'm pretty sure "spellingly" isn't a ...
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“Come home.” — other adverbs which refer to the noun versions of themselves?

In the phrase Come home. the word 'home' is playing the role of adverb, and essentially means 'to or towards home'. It is interesting to me that it has a rather recursive definition; are there ...
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34 views

Which is correct: to 'throw hard' or 'throw fast'? [closed]

Which is the correct adverb? Or can both be used? If so, how should one decide which one to use?
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111 views

Could the “pseudo” adverbial phrases modify the real adverbial phrases?

1)A woman fell 50 feet down a cliff. 2)The project was finished 10 days ahead of the schedule. 3)Emma is 10 years older than Sophie. 4)I finished the project 10 days ago. 1)50 feet/10 days/10 ...
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is there a special term for using “very” in combination with adverby which can only be either/or [closed]

Sometimes people use the word "very" in combination with adverbs which can only be either/or. for instance: "the floor is very wet". This may not be the best example, but the floor can either be wet ...
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27 views

Adverb location according to auxiliary verb

Even though there are examples of location of adverb related to auxiliary verb, I am still doubtful about where to put the adverb in this particular example. I need to make a very formal sentence: ...
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1answer
40 views

using amidst in mathematic [closed]

I use a very formal writing style. If I want to say that I calculate a function between 5 times between each two points, can I use amid these ways? The function f(t) is calculated 5 times amidst ...
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57 views

word for widestly (adverb of widest)

I am going to paraphrase this sentence: It is one of the mostly used methods in .... and I want to replace mostly with widest, but it is an adjective, not an adverb: It is one of the ...
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Adverb Form of “Fallible” [closed]

I would like to correctly use an adverb form of "fallacy." Which of these words is correct - fallibly or fallaciously - in this example sentence? "My argument is [insert word here] idiotic." I ...
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Position of adverb with respect to the adjective it modifies [closed]

The arm was so badly injured (a) that he must have (b) it amputated (c). Which part of this sentence has an error? Should it be "The arm was injured so badly." Is that right?