An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Difference between 'through' and 'throughout'

I'm not sure which is correct: The bride's mother sniffed all the way through/throughout the wedding service. According to the Cambridge dictionary, 'through' means 'from the beginning to the ...
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90 views

“Cowardly” as an adverb [closed]

Is "cowardly" both an adjective and an adverb? Question inspired by this awkward error message from Homebrew. Error: Cowardly refusing to 'sudo brew install' Surely there is another way to ...
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20 views

“how” vs. “just how”

How does the nuance of the following sentence change with and without the word “just”? That accident is a reminder of just how quickly life can change. Somehow I would automatically put in “just,...
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31 views

Is the phrase, bacterially sealed, correct usage [closed]

If one is referring to a connection between two metallic elements as being so tight that it excludes bacteria, would it be correct usage to say that the connection is bacterially sealed? It sounds ...
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57 views

Why is “and” not used before “, etc.”? [closed]

When you use , etc. to indicate that further, similar items are included, for example: We’re trying to resolve problems of withdrawal, peer pressure, etc. Is it incorrect to use , and etc.?
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192 views

“defeat Trump badly”

In a live-streamed speech, the Vermont senator made it clear he is no longer actively challenging Clinton and that the goal is to ‘defeat Trump badly’ … “The major political task that we face in ...
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49 views

Is it proper to combine prepositions using conjunctions?

I have come across the issue of wanting to use both two prepositions to describe a subject. This is not a common issue, judging by the lack of information regarding it. This is an example of the type ...
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49 views

'Almost people' or 'Almost all people'? [closed]

My japanese students always insist on using 'almost people'. It doesn't sound correct to me but I can't seem to explain clearly. Please tell me if this phrase is really wrong or not. Thanks a lot!
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18 views

adverb vs adjective?

I checked this and this ansver, but it still unclear to me. Let's say This car is fast (slow, careful, lazy) Here fast/slow definitely is adjective, it describes the car. But if we modify ...
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“What” as an adverb

In "What does it matter?", the "what" is considered as not a pronoun but an adverb in most dictionaries. I'd like to see more example sentences where "what" is used as an adverb like this. But the ...
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55 views

“That's great.” Is “great” here an adjective or an adverb? [closed]

"I cleared the exam." "That's great." Is 'great' used here considered an adjective or an adverb? An adjective defines a noun while an adverb is related to a verb. My belief is that here it refers ...
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61 views

“At least” as focus adverb

There is at least one distributor interested. ("at least" means "a minimum of") At least there is one distributor interested. ("at least" means "fortunately, happily") Are the explanations correct? ...
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56 views

Is “betterly” a word? [closed]

Consider the sentence: Sorry for the poorly worded sentence, I could not find a way to word it betterly. Does the word “betterly” exist? Can it be used in a sentence like that?
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Is “over” meaning “again” related to “over”'s other meanings?

In addition to the physical position meaning of "over" there are a number of nonphysical and temporal meanings in common usage, including "again". My own examples: I couldn't read your note. Write ...
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“positively/negatively related to” OR “directly/inversely related to ”?

It seems there are two ways to describle when variable X increases as variable Y decreases: X is negatively related to Y, OR X is inversely related to Y. when variable X increases as variable Y ...
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33 views

What does the adverb “yesterday” modifiy in a clause?

Not only yesterday, but other Time Adverbs as well. What do they "modify" in a clause? Example: The athletes ran yesterday
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110 views

Adverbs in noun phrase coordination

Consider the following example sentence: The ball often hit the tree and never the man. I am trying to represent this sentence as a constituency-based parse tree, but I am having a hard time ...
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Is there an adverbs replacement dictionary?

I'm practicing replacing adverbs with strong verbs. I read about few strategies that help replace adverbs. (E.g. this). I understand that a lot of it depends on the context. Adverbs can be removed, ...
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“Stories are so much a part of our lives that many people seldom think about them.” : The use of 'so' and 'so much' as intensifiers

There are 176 hits in COCA for [be] so much a part of, including the title and: 1- It actually is so much a part of life. 2- Law is so much a part of me, I don't think I'll ever be able to let ...
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104 views

How to analyse “Shot dead” [closed]

What kind of a term is 'shot dead'? "He was shot dead." Is 'dead' an adverb here? "He shot Sam dead." This is like a phrasal verb, but 'dead' isn't a preposition or particle. Is 'shot dead' some ...
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21 views

six points clear of Jack in fifth place

a. In the most recent rankings, Don sits six points clear of Jack in fifth place. b. In the most recent rankings, Don sits six points clear of Jack, in fifth place. In the second sentence there is ...
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34 views

Adverb or Adjective

What would be correct: Use an adverb to modify another adjective or simply an adjective in the following sentence? The technique generates unnecessary large number of classifiers The ...
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16 views

names for repetitive sequences [duplicate]

The words once, twice, thrice describe the number of repetitions in a series of such repetitions or possible repetitions. I have searched several authoritative dictionaries & thesauruses without ...
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47 views

Adverb at the end of a sentence

Is the "in them" in this sentence necessary? Globalization is an aggregation of international processes that benefit the countries that participate in them.
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50 views

Word for something 'done out of anger'? [closed]

Is there one word that suggests that something was 'done out of anger'? Usage similar to something done deliberately or intentionally, only including the motivation of anger.
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Is that “the most” or just “most” to be used for a superlative of an adverb?

I wonder whether to use the determinant "the" when it is to be used for superlative of an adverb as follows: (A) These neurons innervate most densely to layer 1. (B) These neurons innervate ...
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587 views

How do you call..? vs. What do you call…?

It seems an open-and-shut case, the correct version for asking the word of something in English is What do you call ... ? And yet the sheer number of second-language speakers of English who ask ...
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60 views

Position of “still”

I wonder which once is correct: He might still be waiting for you. or He might be still waiting for you. Do they mean the same?
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Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. vs. I arrived home. "Arrive" is an intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object, but 'home' is an adverb of place and I don't think any preposition can be used ...
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24 views

Verbs used as infintives

I want to go home. We come to help him. He was the first guy in our crowd to marry. Why "to go" is use as a noun vs. "to help" is used as an adverb vs. "to marry" is used as an adjective?
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What's a word for when you try to be something?

I don't mean it in a way where you're trying to be something that you're not, rather, where you're trying to be more of something that you already are (maybe not 100% of the time but you still have ...
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40 views

Adverb “already”

I have got a question about the adverb "already". Where should we put it in the sentence? Is "already" put after a subject and auxiliary verb but before predicate verb in the sentence? May we also put ...
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50 views

Can you say “reasonably technically possible”?

I am translating an agreement into English. Can you say "destroy confidential information to the extent reasonably technically possible"? It may be difficult to destroy ALL back-up copies of digital ...
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Can “yet” modify adjective? [closed]

I think it can, but I am not sure. For example: He's the lord in the yet functioning duchy of [duchyName] (I am trying to imply that while the duchy is still present, it may crumble in the ...
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64 views

Using too many 'to's in a sentence?

This may be more of a stylistic question than anything else, but I'm hoping for some general rules about using the word 'to' in a sentence and when it might be used too many times. For example, I'm ...
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Can we reduce this adverb clause? “In winter, the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as when they were first discovered by Cartier.”

Can we change it to "...as when first discovered by Cartier"? Is " when they were first discovered by Cartier" an adverb clause? Or does the adverb clause start with "as isolated as..."? Is either ...
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78 views

Need a comma before an adverb as last word in sentence?

When an adverb is the last word in a sentence, is it preferable to insert a comma before that word or to leave it as is (with no comma)? For example: How many employees, roughly? or How many ...
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I washed the dishes clean

Firstly, is "I washed the dishes clean." a grammatically correct sentence? If it is right, I have a question about it: in this sentence, is "clean" an adverb or an adjective? I think that "I cleanly ...
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675 views

Three Consecutive Verbs?

Let's say you're in an interview and the interviewer leans forward and says: "I want to get to know you better." In this context, which is the verb? My initial reaction is: Want - auxiliary verb To ...
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80 views

'Well' after: How to use 'well after' in a sentence? [closed]

She waited till well after midnight. What does well after signify here? There are 51 definitions of well at the Merriam Webster Dictionary. It is not immediately obvious which one applies here. ...
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50 views

“With this, …” at the beginning of a sentence followed by comma

I am reviewing a scientific article for the professor I work for. I found that his use of "With this, ..." at the beginning of a sentence followed by a comma was weird so I suggested he remove or ...
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110 views

Can I say “more better” in unusual circumstances like this?

I was talking a few minutes ago and found myself completely stumped as to how to phrase a statement without taking thirty minutes to say what I was trying to say or breaking a grammatical rule and ...
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45 views

“Trivially translate” vs. “translate trivally” — which is corrent?

Which one is correct? Do both sentences have the same meaning? The table definition does not trivially translate to the underlying data structures. The table definition does not translate ...
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58 views

“natural and artificially flavored” or “naturally and artificially flavored”?

I saw a food label that read: "natural and artificially flavored" A friend suggested this was the correct wording: "naturally and artificially flavored" Which is correct and why?
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How did “that is” evolve into informal “as in”? [closed]

Someone might write: Our ​friends, that is to say ​our son's ​friends, will ​meet us at the ​airport. Yet, say: Our ​friends, as in ​our son's ​friends, will ​meet us at the ​airport. How ...
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38 views

adverbs in perfect tenses

I have a question that is making my blood boil. Today watching a classic movie, Betty Davis said "I'd have never done that". I realize it is "I would have never done that". This is not the question....
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56 views

Use of the word 'respectively' [duplicate]

I want to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct: "John's largest tomato and largest pumpkin outweighed Bill's by 2 and 17 pounds, respectively." I am trying to say "John's largest ...