An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why Is “You did well.” Even Grammatically Correct (American English)?

One of the classic battles prescriptive grammarians fight is that "You did good." is grammatically wrong, while "You did well." is correct. The justification for this is that "well" is a legitimate ...
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26 views

Like (adjective) vs As (adverb) [duplicate]

May you please tell me which one is the correct usage: Run like the wind - common Run as the wind - grammatically correct?
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3answers
79 views

The day started off incredibly terribly?

Is it grammatically correct to say: The day started off incredibly terribly. My reasoning is that it is, since this is correct: The day started off terribly. The manner in which the day ...
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5answers
115 views

Is there a word for overly friendly speech from someone who insults you behind your back?

Is there a verb or adverb to describe the overly friendly speech or tone of someone who has said something bad about you behind your back but doesn't know that you know?
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1answer
73 views

A Question on Parallelism

Sample sentence: "With three days remaining in the term, Mitzy started doing research, creating an outline, and wrote a rough draft." In this case, is "doing" a verb in parallel with "creating" but ...
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verbs' transition into usage as adverbs and adjectives (and nouns) [closed]

When, historically, in English and its source languages did this happen? For example: Verb form "to walk" becoming noun "a walk." or much later, same word: "To walk the walk." or "a pleasant walk" ...
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143 views

Adverb for 'within a short timeframe'

Please come by the Secretary's Office so we can solve your problem [on the spot]. What I want to say instead of the placeholder is that as soon as the person comes to the office (be it today or ...
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Sentence patterns [closed]

I'm simply asking, of the 10 basic sentence patterns, which do these three sentences fit/fulfill. Sentence 1: She acted brilliantly. She is the noun phrase; acted is an action verb. Brilliantly ...
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agent vs. force [closed]

Ethnic Unity -- What can we learn from the evidence furnished by language? Racial unity alone, a secondary force, is in no way necessary for linguistic community. I am wondering whether or not ...
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Is 'lightning' here a noun or an adjective or even an adverb?

Oxford Dictionaries has this example under ADJECTIVE 'lightning': (1) Roman is lightning quick and improving every day in practice, and Bean showed playmaking ability in the preseason. The ...
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such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
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Double Adverb Use e.g. *equally shockingly* [closed]

Yesterday, my biology instructor said (I'm paraphrasing here): "Shockingly, this cell does blah blah blah, and equally shockingly, the cell blah blah blah." Is this proper grammar (I speak American ...
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98 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
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61 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...
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107 views

Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
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1answer
76 views

Does the adverb “quitely” exist?

I was surprised not to find the adverb "quitely" in my dictionary whereas I am pretty sure that I saw it several times. Does it exist or is it a (common?) mistake?
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Is there an -ically suffixed word to describe a duration?

We know about chronologically to describe order by time, but is there a word to describe duration? I want to say something like "school is x-ically taxing", as in, school is heavily taxing on an ...
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47 views

Adverb for “multiple”

Say that I have a Pokemon with 2 types: Fire and Flying. One could say this Pokemon has "multiple types." That is because the designer of this Pokemon "typed" it that way. Is it correct to say the ...
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Term meaning careful and thorough, almost excessively so [duplicate]

I'm trying to think of a term which means that one expends extra effort or materials in making sure that something is done properly, to an almost excessive or extravagant extent. One good is example ...
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121 views

How do I say “every three hours” in one word?

Given that tri-hourly means thrice every hour, how then do I say every three hours?
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47 views

Correct use of “immediately” [duplicate]

I have two variants of one sentence and I want to find out which of them is correct and why: So you'll see immediately the notification when the crucial for you information changes. So you’ll ...
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3answers
170 views

On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
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4answers
87 views

The correct positioning of a sentence adverb in a sentence [duplicate]

Three days? I think that it is not simply enough time. Three days? I think that it is simply not enough time What rule of grammar informs acceptable word order in this case?
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1answer
53 views

When to use more or -er [duplicate]

Is there a rule as to when I use "more" in a sentence or "-er"? For example, "I think it would be more fun/funner if we stayed home tonight." I know the correct usage in this sentence but is there a ...
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1answer
91 views

What comes after thrice? [duplicate]

When you want to say something occurred only one time, it's "once". Two is twice, three is thrice. What's for four?
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72 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
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“Cheat legal” - grammatically correct?

The slogan Cheat legal! used by the Australian company SKINS has bugged me every since I saw their advertisement on TV. Only recently, I realized that there is a chance that it may actually be ...
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Where to put the adverb in passive sentences?

While writing another question on this site, I was uncertain about placement of adverbs in passive sentences. It shouldn't frequently be used in the context of immaterial things. It shouldn't ...
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Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
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65 views

Can we use “bad” as an adverb in writing and formal speech? [duplicate]

Should a lecturer say "He felt bad" or "He felt badly"? "His tooth ached so bad he couldn't sleep" or "His tooth ached so badly he couldn't sleep"? Are both forms acceptable in formal ...
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3answers
153 views

When does one append “-ly”?

I am trying to understand the difference between adjectives that end in ‑ly compared with adjectives that do not end end in ‑ly. For example (the ones I would have chosen are bold): A tactical ...
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1answer
36 views

Meaning of snobbishly [closed]

I'm reading The Great Gatsby and on the second page it says: As my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth. ...
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1answer
64 views

Are focusing adverbs exceptions of adverb definitions?

“Adverbs characteristically modify verbs and other categories except nouns, especially adjectives and adverbs.” (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p.563) “The basic division, ...
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30 views

“There” as an adverb

In sentences like, "there is a great place down the street," and "there is no reason to do that," there is being used as an adverb, and OED defines this particular usage as: ADVERB (usually ...
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28 views

Order of words in sentence

I am asked the following the question: Question: Why are your results important? Answer: For segmenting and classifying a stream of documents dynamically without a fixed training ...
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37 views

and would be a professionally paid engagement

Which is correct? "This would be a professionally paid engagement." or "This would be a professional paid engagement." Maybe "professionally" as paid is a verb and "professionally" is an adverb? ...
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3answers
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Aberrant usage of the adjective “incredulous” [closed]

Below is a sentence I found in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Could you please explain why the adjective "incredulous" is used as if it's an adverb? 'You sold the car?' she asked, ...
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1answer
55 views

What principle guides word combinations with “almost”?

I am trying to explain to non-native speakers how to use "almost." I can't formulate (a) rule(s) to follow with regard to nouns/pronouns. So far, my only ideas are that almost can be collocated only ...
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Adverbial form of “scrutiny”

What is the adverbial form of the word scrutiny? I'm looking for the exact synonym of the "with scrutiny" expression. I've tried searching for the form like scrutinily but I've only found something ...
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1answer
49 views

When to use under and over as prefixes rather than adverbs with past participles

Is there a rule on when under and over are used as prefixes rather than adverbs when attached to past participles (and whether or not they are hyphenated)? In general, it seems that both words are ...
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2answers
91 views

Adverb order: 'has largely been' or 'has been largely' [duplicate]

Does the placement of an adverb affect its meaning or application? Does each paired sentence here mean the same as the other? 1.1 Mobile technology progress has largely been consumer-driven ...
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He nearly drowned

Imagine two similar, but technically different scenarios: While swimming he was caught by the torrent. It put him under water, he breathed in some water, got unconscious. Some passers-by pulled him ...
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1answer
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“X is not dead, it just smells so” [closed]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
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Why use“it” here?

He lives in a house with big trees all around it. I know "all around" is a adverb, but what is the point of using the pronoun "it" behind a adverb used as an adverbial?
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57 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
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'to the contrary' - is this definition of 'but' correct?

Merriam-Webster lists 'to the contrary' as one of the senses of 'but.' 3 : to the contrary < who knows but that she may succeed> Being worded like this, I'm having a bit of hard time ...
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1answer
48 views

Understanding how to identify the parts of speech for 'all'

Webster's dictionary lists 'all' as an adjective, adverb, pronoun and noun. Swan's Practical English Usage (3rd edition) spends three pages talking about the usages, but I'm left unsure how to ...
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175 views

Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
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65 views

Adverbial phrase in passive construct

Sam built the house (active) The house was built by sam (passive) In the active voice of the sentence, "Sam" is the subject, clear and simple. In the passive construction, what is then the function ...
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Concurrently with or Sequentially To/Sequentially With?

Drug A is administered concurrently with or sequentially to Drug B. I want to say in a formal manner that Drug A and Drug B are administered either at the same time or at different times, but I ...