An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Are focusing adverbs exceptions of adverb definitions?

“Adverbs characteristically modify verbs and other categories except nouns, especially adjectives and adverbs.” (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p.563) “The basic division, ...
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“There” as an adverb

In sentences like, "there is a great place down the street," and "there is no reason to do that," there is being used as an adverb, and OED defines this particular usage as: ADVERB (usually ...
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Order of words in sentence

I am asked the following the question: Question: Why are your results important? Answer: For segmenting and classifying a stream of documents dynamically without a fixed training ...
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33 views

and would be a professionally paid engagement

Which is correct? "This would be a professionally paid engagement." or "This would be a professional paid engagement." Maybe "professionally" as paid is a verb and "professionally" is an adverb? ...
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71 views

Aberrant usage of the adjective “incredulous”

Below is a sentence I found in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Could you please explain why the adjective "incredulous" is used as if it's an adverb? 'You sold the car?' she asked, ...
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42 views

What principle guides word combinations with “almost”?

I am trying to explain to non-native speakers how to use "almost." I can't formulate (a) rule(s) to follow with regard to nouns/pronouns. So far, my only ideas are that almost can be collocated only ...
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30 views

Adverbial form of “scrutiny”

What is the adverbial form of the word scrutiny? I'm looking for the exact synonym of the "with scrutiny" expression. I've tried searching for the form like scrutinily but I've only found something ...
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32 views

When to use under and over as prefixes rather than adverbs with past participles

Is there a rule on when under and over are used as prefixes rather than adverbs when attached to past participles (and whether or not they are hyphenated)? In general, it seems that both words are ...
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He nearly drowned

Imagine two similar, but technically different scenarios: While swimming he was caught by the torrent. It put him under water, he breathed in some water, got unconscious. Some passers-by pulled him ...
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79 views

“X is not dead, it just smells so” [closed]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
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Why use“it” here?

He lives in a house with big trees all around it. I know "all around" is a adverb, but what is the point of using the pronoun "it" behind a adverb used as an adverbial?
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42 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
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60 views

'to the contrary' - is this definition of 'but' correct?

Merriam-Webster lists 'to the contrary' as one of the senses of 'but.' 3 : to the contrary < who knows but that she may succeed> Being worded like this, I'm having a bit of hard time ...
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32 views

Understanding how to identify the parts of speech for 'all'

Webster's dictionary lists 'all' as an adjective, adverb, pronoun and noun. Swan's Practical English Usage (3rd edition) spends three pages talking about the usages, but I'm left unsure how to ...
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133 views

Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
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37 views

Adverbial phrase in passive construct

Sam built the house (active) The house was built by sam (passive) In the active voice of the sentence, "Sam" is the subject, clear and simple. In the passive construction, what is then the function ...
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36 views

Concurrently with or Sequentially To/Sequentially With?

Drug A is administered concurrently with or sequentially to Drug B. I want to say in a formal manner that Drug A and Drug B are administered either at the same time or at different times, but I ...
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56 views

Rules governing “quite a [adjective]” word order

As part of an answer on another StackExchange site, I have a sentence reading, in part, "[A religious manual] which has quite a long section on [the subject of the question] says ..." I was looking ...
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3answers
57 views

Mandatory to NOT something [closed]

I'm looking for some type of inverse of "mandatory to not", as in "mandatory to not have any errors in your exam" or "mandatory to not read foreign words in the book." (Those must sound awful to a ...
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295 views

“Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?

I just came across something I'd written a while ago that contained the phrase "follows close behind", and my first thought was that it was incorrect and should be "follows closely behind", i.e. to ...
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2answers
76 views

Can “here” be an adjective? [duplicate]

This book here is the one I was talking about. My brother here just bought a new car. The two examples above have here following a noun. Most dictionaries say "here" is an adverb. I am ...
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1answer
75 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
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1answer
49 views

Using 'certainly' at the end of a sentence — what is the correct punctuation and what is the construction called?

Consider this construction: Certainly, I will see you tomorrow. The word 'certainly' constitutes an introductory phrase, and the appropriate punctuation to use is a comma. (AFAIK). Now, ...
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Ways to perceive something: textually, visually, acoustically? [duplicate]

Textual describes something as being in text form. I can read something that is textual. Something that is visual can be viewed. I can listen to something that is acoustical in nature? I don't think ...
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1answer
99 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
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76 views

Degrees of comparison for words ending in “-ly”

Would you make a word ending in -ly positive, comparative, or superlative? I'm sort of leaning towards positive at the moment, and if the answer is positive, would you put more and most for ...
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52 views

the difference between “no”, “not” and “none”? [closed]

How do we differentiate the use of "no", "not" and "none" ? I do not have a chair I do no have a chair I have no a chair I have none a chair
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60 views

“force kill” vs “forcibly kill”

To my knowledge, force can be used as a noun or verb, but cannot be used as an adverb. However, google tells me: there are over 72,000 results for "force kill a process" while, there are only 9200 ...
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3answers
76 views

Why do we say “so much more” rather than “so more ”? Why do we have to put the much in?

If the definition of the word so is an extent, then why do we have to put another word that describes a quantity after it, as "so much more" or "so much better"? Why can't we just say, so more or so ...
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1answer
45 views

Will I love you forever? or Will I love you for ever?

http://youtu.be/cgNMSJTevAk?t=2m10s This test states that the correct answer is: "Will I love you for ever?" There are numerous songs\articles on the internet that say that "forever" is the right ...
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2answers
85 views

Conjugations of Ancillary

Ancillary is already something of an uncommon word in conversation, but it came up recently in a StackOverflow chat room in the following example: Person 1: "Are you talking about me?" Person 2: ...
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2answers
53 views

Difference between “hop the rocks quickly” and “quickly hop the rocks”

I'm trying to decide which sentence is correct, or if they both are. which would you recommend as easier to read/understand for the average reader? Hop the rocks quickly and get the star. ...
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Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
2
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1answer
36 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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once, twice, thrice… was there more? [duplicate]

I realize everyone uses 'four times', 'five times'... in case of denoting something repeating more than three times. Even 'thrice' is currently gradually going extinct. But did English ever possess ...
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0answers
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Ordinal numbers as adverbs [duplicate]

I was once told not to end "firstly [point 1], secondly [point2], thirdly [point 3]" in -ly and to leave them as first, second, third etc. Is this always true or only in certain situations? Is it ever ...
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Why do we use “awfully” as an intensifier?

First, consider this sentence: We lost the game because we played awfully. Since "awful" means "very bad," it makes sense that "awfully" means "very badly." Now, consider these two sentences: ...
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41 views

“In here” or only “here” [closed]

I would use here with no preposition, like I wish you are here. They are coming here. However talking to a well-educated British woman I noted she would put an in before here. Since then I only ...
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3answers
195 views

Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
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4answers
92 views

I'm looking for this word that means showing understanding or assent but may be faux assent

The word had been used with "nodding [such-ly]". If I remember correctly, the person I heard this from was describing one of the attributes you needed to be a manager was to be able to listen to ...
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4answers
109 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
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2answers
57 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
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3answers
107 views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
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1answer
60 views

“Money is all what/that I need.” [duplicate]

1.) Money is all that I need. 2.) Money is all what I need. Which one is right? or which one have you not ever seen? and is there any difference between them? But, what about the following? If ...
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2answers
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which one should I use for this question 'faster or fast' [closed]

I should walk _______ so I can catch up with my brother. Is the answer is fast or faster?
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6answers
112 views

Asking very strongly

I have a problem, how to intensify asking for something without turning to loaded, negative begging. Two heroic fugitives run from authorities and find a temporary hideout. Then two other brave souls ...
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135 views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
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1answer
111 views

How to properly identify adverbial modifiers? [closed]

I do not fully understand what they mean by structure of the adverbial modifier or type. Does 'type' mean the question it answers i.e. where, when, how? Below I listed the adverbial modifiers which ...
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To what extent is hardly a negative adverb?

The American Heritage Dictionary notes about adverbs like hardly that they are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she ...