An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Adjectives with verbs: when do I need a comma? [on hold]

I was always told to use the adverb with the verb, and not the verb with the adjective. "I walk slowly" Not "I walk slow" But I can add a comma and say: "I walk, slow". But in my dictionary I ...
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40 views

Ambiguity with adverbs when using the word “or”

If you take the sentence "Bob will run or walk fast." how is the ambiguity resolved between the following two meanings? Bob will either run fast or he will walk fast. Bob will either ...
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89 views

“completely” usage confusion

As I know, verbs are followed by adverbs. So, which is true? "She stands there completely expressionlessly" Or "she stands there completely expressionless" Though I think the second one is likely to ...
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31 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [on hold]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
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62 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
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22 views

The variations of in/for the last few days

1.I was not able to gain access to Internet in last a few days. 2.I was not able to gain access to Internet last a few days. 3.I was not able to gain access to Internet in a few days. ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
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42 views

Is “per se” used more in formal or informal situations?

What is the formality level of "per se"?
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43 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
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2k views

“Sometimes”, “oftentimes” — is there a -times word for “very rarely”?

If something happens sometimes, it happens occasionally. If something happens oftentimes, it happens often. Is there an equivalent word for something happening very rarely?
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63 views

True meaning of these 'adverbials'

Recently I had a discussion with someone and the following examples were brought up. I was told that I was wrong, but as a native speaker I don't think any of my explanations of the meaning were ...
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682 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
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57 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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59 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense? [closed]

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
4
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1answer
69 views

Usage of adverbs like reasonably, practically, essentially, ridiculously, basically

I have recently noticed a phenomenon in English, that seems quite common. The phenomenon is regarding the usage of certain adverbs: Practically should mean in a practical manner. But it is often ...
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4answers
84 views

Is there an adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?

“Still” means “in the past and now”: “It is still raining.” Is there an English adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?
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96 views

Using adjectives after verbs?

In a lot of sentences when speaking people use adjectives after verbs. In some examples it sounds right, however, and I was wondering if such uses were valid in formal writing. The only example I ...
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1answer
99 views

Is “Tomorrow, I will buy it” correct? [closed]

My brother and I are having a discussion, whether it is grammatically correct (or any native speaker would ever say a sentence): Tomorrow, I will buy it. I think it is not correct, it strikes me ...
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3answers
76 views

“This is particularly since…”

Recently I came across this sentence: [... allegations that such information had been used elsewhere] This is particularly since you were given access to the information. I have been trying to ...
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1answer
47 views

To Witness Something of Such Beauty

There is a word used in English but from Italian (I think) which has the following meaning: To witness something or someone of such profound beauty that you are compelled to sing aloud in ...
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258 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
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2answers
64 views

Replacement for “narrowly missed?”

I am trying to remove adverbs from my writing. My grant proposal narrowly missed the funding threshold. I want to replace the phrase "narrowly missed" or change the whole sentence but still ...
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1answer
48 views

Capital letter after adverb [closed]

In sentences like: Also, it provides ... Also, It provides ... is it allowed to place It (with a capital I) instead of it after the adverb Also?
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48 views

Is “originally first” a grammar error?

I understand that the phrase "originally first" is repetitive, but is it a grammatical error? For more context, the phrase appeared in the following sentence which was marked wrong for repetition. ...
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1answer
68 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...
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2answers
32 views

How to choose between “spatial” or “spatially”?

I'm writing my thesis and I need help with the title, here it is: Improved seam merging for temporally and spatially video resizing with structure and motion preservation I am not sure about the ...
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21 views

Can I wish someone on new home as “ my cordial wishes to your family on new home” [closed]

I would like to wish my boss on her new home. Is the below statement correct? My cordial wishes to your family on new home
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47 views

Use of “respectively” in “both these localities are on the banks, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream”

Both these source localities are on the banks of the Rhine, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream from Bonn. In the above sentence, is respectively needed, and if so, is it properly used?
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34 views

Is it correct to say “more sufficient”?

I suggest that the maintenance period be from 12:30 to 2:30 so that we can have more sufficient time to handle if any unexpected problems occur. Is it correct to say more sufficient?
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3answers
102 views

“Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”

I'm editing a short movie. In the title screens, after the production company is listed, there needs to be a play on the common "Proudly Presents" text. It is with some chagrin that the production ...
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68 views

“in danger”: an adverb or an adjective?

Is the expression "in danger" an adverb or an adjective? Why?
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44 views

In theory or theoretically: use of adverbs

Which form is more correct or more readable for writing a scientific article: In theory D is constant when q tends to infinity. or Theoretically D is constant when q tends to infinity. Thanks
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43 views

Commas with conjunctive adverbs [closed]

Which is correct? Certainly that was a good thing. or, Certainly, that was a good thing.
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81 views

I know this sentence is wrong but

I'm trying to explain to the person who wrote it, and to myself, why it is wrong. Dan plays the drums as vindictively as though they’d personally insulted him. The "as adverbially as though" is ...
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35 views

the X event after next…Th

Is it grammatically correct to say "at the steering committee meeting after next"? The idea is that there are meetings every two weeks, but the intention is for something to be presented not at the ...
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51 views

Which verb has been modified?

Which verb has been modified by adverb "directly" in the following sentence? "Some governments even offer to help protect their critical infrastructure directly, by deploying sensors in the networks ...
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1answer
51 views

What does “not perhaps” mean?

What exactly does "not perhaps" mean? I encountered it in Smith's The Wealth of Nations In Chapter I. Of The Division Of Labour: The effects of the division of labour, in the general business of ...
2
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1answer
125 views

Can I delete the relative adverb “where” anytime?

Can I say, "You can stand in the house Romeo and Juliet fell in love." In this case, relative adverb 'where' was deleted. But I think there should be "in" at the end of the sentence. Am I right? Can ...
3
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1answer
116 views

What is the word “funny” modifying in this sentence?

I don’t understand why Daniella is acting so funny. Is funny modifiying Daniella (which would make it an adjective) or is it modifying acting (making it an adverb)? Is there any way to tell ...
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417 views

Why is there no such word as “percentagely”?

If I want to use an adverb to say, for example: I'm not sure you could do it. I can say that percentagely / in percentage there are few hopes. Is there a specific reason there is no such word in ...
3
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4answers
132 views

Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
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3answers
122 views

Proper placement of “exactly”?

I want to ask a question whose meaning is "what is the exact way in which X works?". Where is the most appropriate place for the adverb "exactly"? How exactly does X work? How does exactly X work? ...
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346 views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
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71 views

Is it common to use “totally” in such a way as “Michelle Obama’ s totally running in California.” [duplicate]

Vanity Fair magazine (October 23 issue) carried an article titled, “A brief history of Michelle Obama career-goal rumors,” and wrote as follows under the caption, “She’s totally running in ...
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1answer
123 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
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1answer
171 views

Can you end a sentence with 'hence'?

Pretentiousness/archaism aside, does the sentence Any changes that were made have been detailed hence. make sense? The context would be that the descriptions of changes would be found in the ...
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Discerning between as and so?

I would appreciate it, if someone readily explain the difference between these. As, I yet to get what the first one means precisely, I had to broach such a discussion. UPDATED: The world was created ...
2
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3answers
710 views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
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1answer
78 views

No adverb of controlled?

Can anyone confirm that there is indeed no adverbial form of "controlled" that could be used with verbs that describe actions done in a controlled way. For example, it seems to be wrong to write ...
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38 views

Do certain contrasting conjunctions + certain contrasting adverbs = redundancy?

For example, would the following sentence with either ‘rather’ or ‘instead’ included in the middle (or, for that matter, with ‘instead’ alone at the end) be redundant. If a redundancy, would it rise ...