An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Does “unexpectedly” apply to one or both following verb phrases?

We're having a discussion in a forum on rulings in duplicate bridge. In duplicate bridge, each partnership has their own set of bidding system agreements, and there are regulations that specify that ...
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1answer
72 views

Why do people say “Go down this road” or “Go down this corridor” instead of saying “Go straight” [closed]

I was wondering, when giving directions, is it correct to say "go straight" instead of "go down"? Does down and straight in the context of giving directions mean the same thing?
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23 views

Hyphenation of a multiple adverb-past participle phrase

I am editing a research article, and I came across a phrase that I am having some trouble hyphenating: "the detoxification of both endogenous and exogenous derived acetaldehyde." My thought is that ...
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2answers
297 views

Correct or correctly: “I got them all correct / correctly”?

I just answered a battery of test questions, and posted the following comment: "I got them all correctly." Should I have said "I got them all correct."?
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1answer
27 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

What is the difference between "not a bit" and "not one bit"? I thought they both have the same meaning, but I was wondering if there could be a slight difference meaning between those phrases. For ...
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2answers
83 views

Is there an unkindly way to say thank you? [duplicate]

Are you not already being kind by saying thank you to begin with? I read the comments on this site What's the deal with thank you kindly?, and I guess that I am still pretty confused as to the ...
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1answer
55 views

easier, more easily, or easy [duplicate]

I'm a programmer and I'm combing through some code and entering comments to help other developers. I wrote the following sentence and got confused by the (possibly) dangling verb. I've spared you the ...
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0answers
67 views

Omitted words in a sentence [duplicate]

Here is an excerpt from Steve Job's speech. "...On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind __________ you might find yourself walking along if ...
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1answer
80 views

Difference between near, nearby and close

Could you tell me a ( near - nearby - close ) pharmacy? I live ( near - nearby - close ) to the bank. Don't leave. I'm (near - nearby - close ). Do you think that they ...
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57 views

usage of adverb never [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "We had a fight and never spoke again". I think the verb "spoke" should be either in simple present or present perfect, shouldn't it?
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1answer
29 views

Punch him good? [duplicate]

I some time ago saw some sentences, "Punch him good", "You punch really good". I assume, that good works as adverb and means well. Upon assuming, I got a question: How has the word good become to mean ...
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1answer
70 views

Fail fast versus fail faster [closed]

Wow, I had no idea that people responding to this post would be so "nit picky"!!! I just wanted an answer on what the proper form of the phrase "fail fast" to use? Adverbs do not need to end in -ly, ...
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1answer
127 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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1answer
46 views

What does “independent” bind to in this sentence? [closed]

Which of the following two sentences is correct? A is valid independent of B. A is valid independently of B. In other words, does independent bind to "are" or "valid"? I tend towards the first ...
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0answers
20 views

“However difficult something is, …” or “However difficult something may/might be, …” ? [duplicate]

Does it make sense to follow an adjective phrase such as "however difficult" with the modal auxiliaries "may/might"? Isn't it a bit pleonastic, since "however" already contains the idea of either ...
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0answers
41 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
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4answers
89 views

“Continuously” vs “continually”: What's the difference? [closed]

What's the difference in the usage of these two adverbs continuously and continually? Here are some examples: a) She was told off for continually being late. b) It rained continuously for ...
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2answers
46 views

An example when adverbials can exchange positions

I am searching two short (4-5 word) grammatical sentences that have two adverbials adv1 and adv2 inside, and in sentence A, adv1 is applied to VP and than adv2, but in sentence B the order is ...
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23 views

Position(s) of 'notwithstanding' as an adverb

Foreword: I wish to understand 'notwithstanding', based on the root withstand; so would all feedback please analogise, invoke and refer back to withstand as much as possible? Hereafter, suppose that ...
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1answer
82 views

“I don't agree totally” vs. “I don't totally agree” vs. “I totally don't agree”

What is the difference between the following? I don't agree with him totally. I don't totally agree with him. I totally don't agree with him. I'm puzzled at the meaning of negative ...
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2answers
52 views

What is the proper construction of this comparative?

This sentence appeared in a recent New Yorker article written by the copy chief there: I find it easier to use the serial comma consistently rather than stop every time I come to a series and ...
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1answer
24 views

Adverbial Form of “Supplementary” [closed]

Does the word "supplementary" have an adverbial form? My first instinct is the word "supplementarily," but as far as I can tell that isn't a word.
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1answer
32 views

Arguably- does the adverb carries “what I am saying is unarguable” connotation [duplicate]

Arguably- “I’m a little confused about the usage of this word. "Roger Federer is arguably the best tennis player ever. This is what I heard in a conversation. My point is does the statement ...
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1answer
55 views

What is the difference between “because” and “for”? [closed]

Is there any substantial difference in the usage of "because"and "for"in a sentence/
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44 views

Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate? [closed]

Imagine that adverbs were banned from the English language, and we had to replace them all with their cognate adjectives. Language would begin to sound bad to our ears that are attuned to the ...
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0answers
49 views

Is it ok to write “very huge” in this context? [duplicate]

I think it is ok to write "very huge" in a context like this (although "very" is a bit redundant here): This is a very huge map. However, the following sounds strange to me: This map is very ...
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1answer
62 views

Can I be “friendfully yours” [closed]

friendly (advs). : Used to mean 'in a friendly manner. I am wondering if "friendfully" was/is in standard usage and would I sound primitive or ungrammatical if I dare write "friendfully yours" ...
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1answer
77 views

We did it at exactly the right time vs We did it at the exactly right time.

I know the first example is correct and I'm pretty sure the second is incorrect, but I wonder why. So, we can say "I saw an extremely angry dog", but not "I saw extremely an angry dog." When do we ...
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39 views

can someone tell me if i am right in identifying the odd word out from these group of words? [closed]

a) taken WENT seen forgotten--- because the rest are verbs b) bright EARLY good some------because the rest are adjectives ??? c) NEVER but unless ...
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5answers
70 views

Ambiguity with adverbs when using the word “or”

If you take the sentence "Bob will run or walk fast." how is the ambiguity resolved between the following two meanings? Bob will either run fast or he will walk fast. Bob will either ...
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3answers
106 views

“completely” usage confusion

As I know, verbs are followed by adverbs. So, which is true? "She stands there completely expressionlessly" Or "she stands there completely expressionless" Though I think the second one is likely to ...
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1answer
41 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
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3answers
92 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
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1answer
43 views

The variations of in/for the last few days

1.I was not able to gain access to Internet in last a few days. 2.I was not able to gain access to Internet last a few days. 3.I was not able to gain access to Internet in a few days. ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
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0answers
82 views

Is “per se” used more in formal or informal situations?

What is the formality level of "per se"?
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2answers
66 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
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3answers
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“Sometimes”, “oftentimes” — is there a -times word for “very rarely”?

If something happens sometimes, it happens occasionally. If something happens oftentimes, it happens often. Is there an equivalent word for something happening very rarely?
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1answer
79 views

True meaning of these 'adverbials'

Recently I had a discussion with someone and the following examples were brought up. I was told that I was wrong, but as a native speaker I don't think any of my explanations of the meaning were ...
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4answers
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Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
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65 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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2answers
79 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense? [closed]

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
4
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1answer
127 views

Usage of adverbs like reasonably, practically, essentially, ridiculously, basically

I have recently noticed a phenomenon in English, that seems quite common. The phenomenon is regarding the usage of certain adverbs: Practically should mean in a practical manner. But it is often ...
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3answers
102 views

Is there an adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?

“Still” means “in the past and now”: “It is still raining.” Is there an English adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?
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2answers
138 views

Using adjectives after verbs?

In a lot of sentences when speaking people use adjectives after verbs. In some examples it sounds right, however, and I was wondering if such uses were valid in formal writing. The only example I ...
2
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1answer
135 views

Is “Tomorrow, I will buy it” correct? [closed]

My brother and I are having a discussion, whether it is grammatically correct (or any native speaker would ever say a sentence): Tomorrow, I will buy it. I think it is not correct, it strikes me ...
2
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3answers
92 views

“This is particularly since…”

Recently I came across this sentence: [... allegations that such information had been used elsewhere] This is particularly since you were given access to the information. I have been trying to ...
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1answer
64 views

To Witness Something of Such Beauty

There is a word used in English but from Italian (I think) which has the following meaning: To witness something or someone of such profound beauty that you are compelled to sing aloud in ...
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1answer
296 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
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2answers
88 views

Replacement for “narrowly missed?”

I am trying to remove adverbs from my writing. My grant proposal narrowly missed the funding threshold. I want to replace the phrase "narrowly missed" or change the whole sentence but still ...