An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Can you “slide your finger across a word”?

How would you explain users of a mobile game how to use this feature ? I have a few ideas but I fear they might not sound natural to native English speakers: "Display the definition of any word by ...
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Difference between an adverb modifying an NP consisting a single noun, and an adverb modifying a noun

Consider the following examples: The work is mostly Kim's. Only Kim resigned. A question some of us had (e.g. here and here) was, aren't these examples of adverbs modifying nouns (which they are not ...
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Adverbs modifying nouns?

1. What this question is about It is about cases where an adverb apparently modifies a word of a type that adverbs aren't supposed to be able to modify, like nouns and personal pronouns. It is very ...
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46 views

Live curious or live curiously? [on hold]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
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36 views

“Look real” or “look realistic”?

Which phrase is correct "the ship model looks real" or "the ship model looks realistic?" It seems that according to some dictionary definitions they are both acceptable in this case.
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41 views

Further or Farther in a metaphor about a road [duplicate]

In this metaphor is it correct to use "further" or "farther"? That only kicks the can further/farther down the road. Within the metaphor, the distance is physical, justifying the use of ...
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28 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
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1answer
57 views

“It's as same watch as the one I lost.” - What is wrong with the sentence?

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, what's wrong with them? It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost.
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“He likes it tomorrow” / “We leave for Hawaii tomorrow” - Why is the first sentence bad?

The following sentences sound right to me: The package arrives tomorrow. (The package is going to arrive tomorrow) We leave for Hawaii tomorrow. (We are going to leave for Hawaii tomorrow) ...
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28 views

Completely, Utterly, or Tremendously excited?

What intensifier would be good for "EXCITED"? And why? I would also need an article or something to strengthen my knowledge of intensifiers, whether (and why) adjectives (or whatever) are gradable ...
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1answer
119 views

Is there a single word to describe “acting in a way unbecoming of a parent?” [closed]

In writing a letter today, I realized I was in need of a word outside my knowledge. I would like to convey that someone acting in a manner unbecoming of parents. In a world where neologisms were ...
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1answer
39 views

Usage of “else” to convey the opposite meaning

I am writing an email to a senior and want to say if he agrees to my suggested changes and if no I will modify it further. So is this ok to say: Kindly suggest if you agree to this revised ...
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Collocation 'bolt upright'

What part of speech is the word 'bolt' in the adverb 'bolt upright'?
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5answers
116 views

What is the correct word for 'worrylessly'?

What would be the appropriate word for worrylessly in this following context "I shall prefer him for this task. And [worrylessly] expect an amazing result.
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6answers
110 views

One-word adverb meaning 'with difficulty', 'not easily'?

Is there a one-word adverb meaning 'with difficulty', 'not easily'? I am working on a grid for assessing pronunciation in speaking (correct sounds, correct intonations) and want to have a scale on ...
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3answers
85 views

Why is it “to take someone seriously” and not “to take someone serious”?

Obviously the difference between these two sentences is that one is using an adverb while the other one is using an adjective. The reason why I think that an adjective should be used, is that the ...
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Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
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1answer
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'Just now': past, future or both?

I only use it speaking of something that has just been done, i.e. in the very near past. I've finished washing the dishes just now. Can it be used also speaking of something that is about to be ...
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4answers
106 views

Word for “complementing each other, while showing an increase in intensity”

I have 2 sentences. The sentences are: In college, I wrote a simple calendar program. Concurrently, 2 years on, I am working on developing a complex universal calendar system. Here, I want ...
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57 views

Word for doing something but not wanting other people to notice? [closed]

It's not secretly. For example, I'm at a mall with a friend, then I notice someone from my school. I point to them to show my friend, who I go to school with. But I don't want the other person to ...
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1answer
61 views

Adverb to show both surprise and fear

I need an adverb to show both surprise and fear. Can we use shockingly or worriedly? For example, He asked shockingly.
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2answers
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Why are both blazing or blazingly appropriate?

This SE QA explains that both blazing and blazingly are valid English words (despite what my spell-checker claims). Can anyone explain why they are both valid, and the difference between the words. ...
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What meaning is “legitimate(ly)” gaining?

I'm familiar with the following meanings of legitimately In a way that conforms to the law or to rules and In a way that can be defended with logic or justification; fairly (both from ...
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1answer
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What part of speech is “alight” in “set alight”?

In the clause it was set alight, is alight acting as adverb and modifying was set an adjective and modifying it; or something else entirely that I'm missing. I'm fairly certain that set ...
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1answer
102 views

Why does “eastwardly” have two opposite meanings?

"Eastwardly" can mean either from the east or to the east. How does one use it without ambiguity?
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When to use “-ly” (scientific language)

I'm wondering about what is the correct wording and in particular, which grammar rules are underlying your decision. Some loci are expressed independent of the environment. Some loci are expressed ...
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1answer
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Using affordably as an adverb

I wish to write: The product cost is affordably accessible to all consumer types. I mean to say: The product cost is so affordable, any type of consumer can afford it. Can I use ...
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51 views

Difference between “weird content” and “weirdly content” [closed]

What's the difference between weird content and weirdly content?
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1answer
46 views

Why “Here COMES the bus!” but “Here he COMES!”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between: Here he comes! and Here comes the bus! Why in the first sentence "comes" is placed after the subject "he", but in 2nd one before the subject "the bus"?
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1answer
36 views

Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs as seen in "come inside" and "run around". My question concerns an ...
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2answers
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“Each” in potential subject position in compound sentence always pronoun?

This question is related to: "Each" — pronoun or adverb The sentence in that question is: M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes In that sentence, how do we know that “each” is a ...
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1answer
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Starting a sentence with “and”-connected adverbs or adverbials

I want compare one thing with two other things, discussing their differences as follows. Balls are better than dice, since they provide better rollability. Moreover and in contrast to eggs, ...
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419 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
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1answer
37 views

Why is an interrogative pronoun not an adverb?

Consider these two sentences. A. Which museum did you visit? B. Which did you visit? In the first case the word "which" functions as an adjective modifying museum and in the second an interrogative ...
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Grammar: the function of “so” after conjunction?

Recently I read this sentence, and I am wondering, what is the function of "so" here? XYZ is the top provider of high-speed Internet services in the country, or so it claims in its ...
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A Conjunctive Adverb for Reverse

I'm looking for a simplistic manner to say To reverse a little, ... or To go back to an earlier statement, ... A single word conjunctive adverb would be best, similar to furthermore or ...
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Is the word “do” an adverb or helping verb

In the sentence "Small children certainly do need careful supervising." Is the word "do" an adverb modifying "need" or is it a helping verb to the main verb "need"? I'm grading papers and a student ...
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2answers
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Is “not actual” in “potential, not actual harm” an adjective phrase or an adverbial phrase?

I think this affects comma placement, right? If it's an adjective phrase modifying harm, then I think it would be: "potential, not actual harm" If it's an adverb phrase modifying potential (by ...
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“Both win in this case, the students […] and science…” is the sentence incorrect?

I am unsure regarding this usage of 'both'. A friend of mine told me it is not correct. Both win in this case, the students who learned a new technique and science with more replications. Could ...
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Concluding vs Concludingly

My English teacher has taught me to use "Concluding" when writing the end part of certain texts (next to other words).Example: Concluding, we can say that... To me it somehow sounds curious. ...
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2answers
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Definite article with the superlative degree of adverbs

Our rotary telephone is the least frequently used device in our house. Ben moved most quietly as the boys walked down the darkened ally. In the first sentence a superlative adverb is used ...
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adverbial markers

1) "Even in those days he played golf every wednesday.".., in this sentence there are two adverbial markers(in those days and every wednesday) so which marker is considered as reference time and ...
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59 views

non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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51 views

Words and phrases to express approximations

I would like to know the distinctions between these following words and phrases when they express approximations. I will be there in about an hour. I will be there in around an hour. I will be ...
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59 views

Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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Placing of adverb in a sentence

"This should perfectly be done". "This should be perfectly done". Of the two sentences, which one is correct? I am confused about placing of adverb "perfectly". Should the adverb be placed before ...
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“None but the brave deserves the fair.” What part of speech is “but”?

In the sentence: None but the brave deserves the fair. ...is the word but here a: pronoun adverb preposition conjunction Normally but is used as conjunction, but here I am not sure if this ...
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3answers
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“quickly walk” or “walk quickly” [duplicate]

Is it "walk quickly" or "quickly walk?" What is the correct way to phrase the sentence: Please walk quickly. Please quickly walk. Thank you.
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2answers
98 views

Is there a suffix to form a noun from an adverb?

I want to know if we have a suffix which can be added to an adverb to form a noun. I have searched about that and I could not find anything about it.
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How did “run over him” evolve to “run him over” over the last 50 years?

Growing up in Alabama, I never heard anyone bastardize the phrase "run over him (with the car)" to "run him over (with the car)", not even on TV or movies. I first noticed the change as I began to ...