Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Negative versions of extreme adjectives

If something positive is "too much", it becomes negative. For example, too much security could be perceived as being trapped. Is there a term for this relation? In other words, if a word with a ...
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58 views

Same adjective for two nouns

The government placed restrictions on both diesel fuel and diesel engines. Here I dont want to repeat the diesel. I cannot write: The government placed restrictions on both diesel fuel and ...
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3answers
294 views

Using the adjective “expressive” to mean an object allows for expression?

My intention is to say that systems of a particular type allow users to express ideas on them. I wanted to give the concept a more concise/general name, as a title for such systems. I called them ...
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2answers
42 views

Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?

I have a phrase "Frequent Automatic Renewals". Must there be a comma, or should I separate them with an "and"?
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2answers
71 views

Adjective/ Collocation with 'Caution:' — Why does 'huge' sound odd?

Simon Johnson, Scottish Political Editor, The Telegraph UK, 11:08PM BST 07 May 2015: Nicola Sturgeon: I'm treating exit poll with huge caution Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: “I’d treat the exit poll ...
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2answers
55 views

Punctuation help

I need help with the correct punctuation for the following: Every empty box symbolizes a child's wish unanswered, and a dream unfulfilled. I think the construction of the sentence is more ...
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2answers
68 views

Fragments and Full Sentences.

"Popular museum located in an old warehouse." Is this a complete sentence? I feel it could become one by changing it to "A popular museum, located in an old warehouse."
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1answer
35 views

Is there a way to contrast the words small/little and big to describe someone/something?

folks! How are you? :) Well, here's my question: Is there a way to contrast the words small/little and big to describe the same person/thing? I found a thread in which I think the question was not ...
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1answer
91 views

A word for “always looking for self-improvement”?

Is there a word which describes a person that is always looking for self-improvement (i.e. is aiming for perfection, never satisfied and is always looking for areas of improvement)? Thank you.
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1answer
135 views

Adjective form of the verb despise?

Saw the title of the movie where minions come out - "Despicable Me" - I was curious, as despicable has the suffix -able, what would be its verb form? Then, I thought, is it de-spice? Which made me ...
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1answer
80 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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1answer
81 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
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1answer
50 views

Adjective for “wide” space?

I'm trying to translate something from Japanese. The original is talking about a store that is very "wide", i.e., its sideways dimensions are disproportionately long. You could think of it as a place ...
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1answer
43 views

“Complicated” or “complicating”

Can anyone tell me why sentence (A) is wrong, and (B) is correct? (A) "The topic of landmines is very heavy and complicating." (B) "The topic of landmines is very heavy and complicated." To me, ...
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1answer
80 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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1answer
48 views

“Accessory” vs “included” as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word accessory as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like "This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones"? I feel that "This DJ ...
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1answer
147 views

Changing a person's name into an adjective

What do you call it when a person's name or group's name is changed into a adjective? Is it "conversion" or "functional shift"? For instance, saying a band's music is "Beatlesque" or that someone's ...
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1answer
81 views

Is correct expression “gone her/him/me”?

I've watched the movie "gone girl". However, I thought that how about "gone her". Then, I'm not sure that correct English expression "gone her". There is the move title, "Despicable me". That word is ...
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1answer
59 views

“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...
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1answer
139 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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1answer
47 views

Fictional vs. Fiction

I apologize in advance if my question has been asked before: there's this club I know called the "Fiction Film Club", and while I know it's used here to specify what kind of film and that sometimes ...
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1answer
264 views

What's the difference between saying 'the passage above' or 'the above passage'?

I'm a Korean High school student and I have a question regarding the use of adjectives. Is there a difference between saying '...the passage above' or '...the above passage?' I'm sure that both of ...
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1answer
888 views

sorry that I did something, sorry for doing something, or sorry to have done something?

Should it be: 1) "I am sorry (that) I did this to you." 2) "I am sorry for doing this to you." 3) "I am sorry to have done this to you." From what I have learnt about 'sorry', I would exclude 3) ...
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1answer
41 views

How to interpret and adjective followed by two nouns

Given the following sentence: Please input the path to the main plugin file How should it be read? I can think of two possible ways to interpret main plugin file: The most important file of ...
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1answer
81 views

antiquarian (adjective) misuse re: dictionary definition

multiple choice ... "antiquarian book" refers to: 1. an antique book about anything 2. any age book about old books 3. a book about people who deal in old books 4. a book in the antiquar language or ...
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Article before “two” with intervening adjective?

Consider the following sentence: (1) The project will include Alice, Bob, and an expected two new hires. This sounds correct to me; it means we are expecting to hire two new people and will put ...
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36 views

Should I say “increased” is an adjective in the following sentence?

Is "increased" an adjective in the context which has come after the verb "get". Senselessness of leaders is getting increased. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you in advanced.
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32 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
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45 views

“Ventilated” brakes or “vented” brakes?

Automobile disc brakes with spacing or gaps separating the contact surfaces are commonly referred to as ventilated brakes. However, I've never heard the word "ventilated" outside of this context. ...
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47 views

How to use hyphen to form new adjectives?

Writing a chemistry paper I need to form an adjective for the following concept: TiO2 rich in oxygen vacancies. Is this the proper formation for an adjective intended to mean that?: ...
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34 views

Directions for comma use between adjectives as per various sources

I read a lot about when comma should be used between a list of adjectives modifying a noun that follows. There are a lotSo much so that now it all looks like a jumble of which adjectives sound better ...
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46 views

when “near” could be considered incorrect grammatically or semantically

Let's verify the word "nearby" is part of a constituent NP in the OP's #2 example: OP.2a. I live in a town nearby. <-- OP's #2 example it-clefts: OP.2b. It is [in a town nearby] that I live. ...
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37 views

Multiple and independent adjectives for a same kind of objects

What I am trying to describe has the following structure: A is P-like something. B is Q-like something. C is R-like something. An example I can think of is like this: A, B, and C are ...
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55 views

What type of adjective is “aesthetic”?

(This is coming from a discussion over at ELL, but the specific nuance below fits here I think). Consider two statements about a dog: The dog has brown fur The dog has aesthetic appeal and two ...
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56 views

Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?

I've been trying to figure out if this slogan requires a comma: Simple, streaming music. versus Simple streaming music I did some reading on comma rules here and here, but I'm still a bit ...
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40 views

alternative to “high depth”, “large depth”

After having used "high depth" in a report, I consider it now almost as an oxymoron. But, is "large depth" better English? What would be an alternative adjective? (I'm not looking for the abyss as I ...
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84 views

“Oxford” comma with adjectives

Suppose you have some coordinate adjectives modifying a noun. E.g. "the cold, tired, hungry dog." You could rewrite this as "the cold and tired and hungry dog" but would these "the ...
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Adjectives and nouns position: before or after?

What's the difference between Rain of Fire and Firerain? Is there a rule for that? For me, the first is literal, you are describing what is raining. The second case would be used to name something, ...