Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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What is a noun for “one who is responsible”?

The word "responsible" works as an adjective only. What is a noun for a person who bears some responsibility (i.e. is accountable for something)? Note: Originally my question was longer, but the ...
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39 views

much natural or more natural?

so I've heard the expression "it sounds more natural" in many English podcasts but as everyone knows "natural" is an uncountable adjective, therefore "much" should be preceded before the adjective. I ...
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39 views

Nouns to adjectives: “-ous” vs. “-ful”

When turning nouns to adjectives, what is the rule for using the suffixes -ous or -ful? Why do pain/harm became painful/harmful and not painous or harmous? Why do glory/nerve become glorious/nervous ...
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35 views

what adjective would describe a person that only does righteous things when they have to?

They don't do it because they want to, but only when no one else can or are able to. They only do it because they have to, because they're told to.
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45 views

Can an adjective be converted into a noun by '-s'?

I saw a passage "this doesn't mean to get riches and honors." 'rich' is an adjective but 'riches' is a plural noun according to the dictionary. Are there any other examples where an adjective becomes ...
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55 views

Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?

I have a phrase "Frequent Automatic Renewals". Must there be a comma, or should I separate them with an "and"?
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67 views

Punctuation help

I need help with the correct punctuation for the following: Every empty box symbolizes a child's wish unanswered, and a dream unfulfilled. I think the construction of the sentence is more ...
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2answers
330 views

Using the adjective “expressive” to mean an object allows for expression?

My intention is to say that systems of a particular type allow users to express ideas on them. I wanted to give the concept a more concise/general name, as a title for such systems. I called them ...
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2answers
114 views

Fragments and Full Sentences.

"Popular museum located in an old warehouse." Is this a complete sentence? I feel it could become one by changing it to "A popular museum, located in an old warehouse."
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1answer
81 views

“…the pleasure enjoyed” – placement of adjective?

A person should not think that happiness is the total pleasure enjoyed. In this sentence, "enjoyed" comes after the subject it describes, even though it is not a phrase or clause. I thought only ...
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1answer
85 views

Word that describes a clown who weakens an argument by taking a side

When there is more than one side in a debate, an argument can be weakened by someone who is seen as stupid or a joker if they are vocal about it. This invalidates your beliefs because if crazy person ...
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1answer
107 views

“It's 20 meters thick” versus “It's a 20-meter-thick layer.”

I know that both of these expressions are correct, but I'd like to be able to explain exactly why the first one is correct. Of course compound adjectives are hyphenated (second expression), but in the ...
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1answer
297 views

Adjective form of the verb despise?

Saw the title of the movie where minions come out - "Despicable Me" - I was curious, as despicable has the suffix -able, what would be its verb form? Then, I thought, is it de-spice? Which made me ...
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1answer
92 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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1answer
110 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
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1answer
19 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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37 views

Adjective meaning “like someone else?”

Example in this case: "experiencing _____ speech" More specifically: "She shouted with a deep voice, a voice not her own."
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104 views

Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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1answer
186 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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114 views

Is correct expression “gone her/him/me”?

I've watched the movie "gone girl". However, I thought that how about "gone her". Then, I'm not sure that correct English expression "gone her". There is the move title, "Despicable me". That word is ...
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1answer
173 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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1answer
42 views

Innovative vs Innovatory

I came accross the word innovatory today. Few terrorist tactics or targets are ever entirely original, but a combination of different elements can often be innovatory. [The Guardian] I checked ...
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1answer
88 views

Fictional vs. Fiction

I apologize in advance if my question has been asked before: there's this club I know called the "Fiction Film Club", and while I know it's used here to specify what kind of film and that sometimes ...
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1answer
86 views

“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...
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1answer
384 views

What's the difference between saying 'the passage above' or 'the above passage'?

I'm a Korean High school student and I have a question regarding the use of adjectives. Is there a difference between saying '...the passage above' or '...the above passage?' I'm sure that both of ...
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63 views

How to interpret and adjective followed by two nouns

Given the following sentence: Please input the path to the main plugin file How should it be read? I can think of two possible ways to interpret main plugin file: The most important file of ...
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28 views

Proper adjective for “used” ticket

What's the proper English adjective for: A one-time ticket (for entrance somewhere, to use some sort of transport to travel somewhere, etc) that's been properly used once and thus no longer valid to ...
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38 views

Using a proper noun (specifically an acronym) as an adjective

Is it colloquial to use a proper noun as an adjective if there isn't a corresponding proper adjective? Going further, is using an acronym/initialism as an adjective okay/formal? I'm trying to prove ...
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71 views

How come we say “data set” instead of “datum set”?

Given that "data" is the plural form, and it's playing the role of an adjective here, how come we don't use the singular form? Other kinds of sets, for example "point set", "skill set", "stationery ...
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33 views

In “thin green candle”, can these adjectives be considered cumulative?

I have read that coordinate adjectives can be separated by commas, since both modify the noun, and cumulative adjectives cannot, since the first noun modifies the combination of the last adjective and ...
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18 views

Adjective meaning “community environment”

I'm trying to say something along the lines of: "Community environment factors include..." I do know that "community environment" is a noun and not an adjective, but I'm stumped for any other ...
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50 views

In the sentence “We do have free will.”, what does “free” stands for?

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective? Edit I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you ...
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47 views

whatever way that S+V

Is it grammatically wrong to include the relative pronoun of "that" between 'whatever way' and 'you look at it' in the following phrase in BBC News. The citizens of Glasgow lose out whatever way that ...
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22 views

Should less be repeated to clarify it applies to a series?

For a sentence like this: That setting results in a less firm and stable surface. Is it clear that less applies to both firm and stable or should it be repeated to avoid ambiguity between the ...
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56 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
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165 views

Irregular adjectives

Are there any other irregular adjectives except these ?
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45 views

use of “due to” or “becasue of” with modal verbs

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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45 views

Standard searchable term for “in person” (of a meeting)

For example, if I were to search Google for support groups and wanted to filter out everything that wasn't in person, what word is my best choice? The words "in" and "person" are individually too ...
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90 views

Should I say “increased” is an adjective in the following sentence?

Is "increased" an adjective in the context which has come after the verb "get". Senselessness of leaders is getting increased. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you in advanced.
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66 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
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109 views

“Ventilated” brakes or “vented” brakes?

Automobile disc brakes with spacing or gaps separating the contact surfaces are commonly referred to as ventilated brakes. However, I've never heard the word "ventilated" outside of this context. ...
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How to use hyphen to form new adjectives?

Writing a chemistry paper I need to form an adjective for the following concept: TiO2 rich in oxygen vacancies. Is this the proper formation for an adjective intended to mean that?: ...
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62 views

Directions for comma use between adjectives as per various sources

I read a lot about when comma should be used between a list of adjectives modifying a noun that follows. There are a lotSo much so that now it all looks like a jumble of which adjectives sound better ...
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52 views

when “near” could be considered incorrect grammatically or semantically

Let's verify the word "nearby" is part of a constituent NP in the OP's #2 example: OP.2a. I live in a town nearby. <-- OP's #2 example it-clefts: OP.2b. It is [in a town nearby] that I live. ...
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Multiple and independent adjectives for a same kind of objects

What I am trying to describe has the following structure: A is P-like something. B is Q-like something. C is R-like something. An example I can think of is like this: A, B, and C are ...
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60 views

What type of adjective is “aesthetic”?

(This is coming from a discussion over at ELL, but the specific nuance below fits here I think). Consider two statements about a dog: The dog has brown fur The dog has aesthetic appeal and two ...
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83 views

Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?

I've been trying to figure out if this slogan requires a comma: Simple, streaming music. versus Simple streaming music I did some reading on comma rules here and here, but I'm still a bit ...
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174 views

alternative to “high depth”, “large depth”

After having used "high depth" in a report, I consider it now almost as an oxymoron. But, is "large depth" better English? What would be an alternative adjective? (I'm not looking for the abyss as I ...
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131 views

“Oxford” comma with adjectives

Suppose you have some coordinate adjectives modifying a noun. E.g. "the cold, tired, hungry dog." You could rewrite this as "the cold and tired and hungry dog" but would these "the ...