Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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what adjective would describe a person that only does righteous things when they have to?

They don't do it because they want to, but only when no one else can or are able to. They only do it because they have to, because they're told to.
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1answer
109 views

“…the pleasure enjoyed” – placement of adjective?

A person should not think that happiness is the total pleasure enjoyed. In this sentence, "enjoyed" comes after the subject it describes, even though it is not a phrase or clause. I thought only ...
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1answer
373 views

Adjective form of the verb despise?

Saw the title of the movie where minions come out - "Despicable Me" - I was curious, as despicable has the suffix -able, what would be its verb form? Then, I thought, is it de-spice? Which made me ...
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1answer
95 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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1answer
117 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
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1answer
44 views

I washed the dishes clean

Firstly, is "I washed the dishes clean." a grammatically correct sentence? If it is right, I have a question about it: in this sentence, is "clean" an adverb or an adjective? I think that "I cleanly ...
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1answer
72 views

Can one form an adverb from any adjective?

I'm trying to form the following sentence: ...we can talk more substantiatively in the event that X occurs. The term "substantiatively" isn't in either the computer dictionary or online at ...
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1answer
26 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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1answer
39 views

Adjective meaning “like someone else?”

Example in this case: "experiencing _____ speech" More specifically: "She shouted with a deep voice, a voice not her own."
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1answer
123 views

Is correct expression “gone her/him/me”?

I've watched the movie "gone girl". However, I thought that how about "gone her". Then, I'm not sure that correct English expression "gone her". There is the move title, "Despicable me". That word is ...
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1answer
184 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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1answer
61 views

Innovative vs Innovatory

I came accross the word innovatory today. Few terrorist tactics or targets are ever entirely original, but a combination of different elements can often be innovatory. [The Guardian] I checked ...
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1answer
115 views

Fictional vs. Fiction

I apologize in advance if my question has been asked before: there's this club I know called the "Fiction Film Club", and while I know it's used here to specify what kind of film and that sometimes ...
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1answer
88 views

“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...
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1answer
454 views

What's the difference between saying 'the passage above' or 'the above passage'?

I'm a Korean High school student and I have a question regarding the use of adjectives. Is there a difference between saying '...the passage above' or '...the above passage?' I'm sure that both of ...
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1answer
66 views

How to interpret and adjective followed by two nouns

Given the following sentence: Please input the path to the main plugin file How should it be read? I can think of two possible ways to interpret main plugin file: The most important file of ...
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0answers
11 views

An adjective for “one who doesn't understand or appreciate the importance of something”

There is an adjective in my mother tongue (Turkish), "kıymet bilmez"... We use it to describe the people who don't understand or appreciate the good things, the good opportunities etc. which they ...
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42 views

Adverbs for non-gradable and base adjectives

I'd like to ask which adverbs should we use for non-gradable and base adjectives. For example : environmental When I read my book, it says : Non-gradable adjectives are not used with adverbs ...
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51 views

I'm trying to describe a sound i.e. a popping sound which is metallic. How do I phrase such a sound?

The best I could come up with is Metallic Pop which doesn't suit the rest of the writing style at all, which has a bit more imaginative use of adjectives. What other phrase could I use to describe ...
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37 views

Using parentheses with possessive pronoun

The following statements makes sense It is impossible to doubt that you exist. It is impossible to doubt that your mind exists. However, if I were to add parentheses to the first statement ...
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34 views

Proper adjective for “used” ticket

What's the proper English adjective for: A one-time ticket (for entrance somewhere, to use some sort of transport to travel somewhere, etc) that's been properly used once and thus no longer valid to ...
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0answers
48 views

Using a proper noun (specifically an acronym) as an adjective

Is it colloquial to use a proper noun as an adjective if there isn't a corresponding proper adjective? Going further, is using an acronym/initialism as an adjective okay/formal? I'm trying to prove ...
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81 views

How come we say “data set” instead of “datum set”?

Given that "data" is the plural form, and it's playing the role of an adjective here, how come we don't use the singular form? Other kinds of sets, for example "point set", "skill set", "stationery ...
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20 views

is there a name for adjectives that end in -ive formed from verbs?

Examples include 'declarative', 'manipulative', 'accusative'. Is there a name for these adjectives that describe something of or related to their base verb?
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20 views

Use of a participial phrase in titles

I was making an essay about cystic fibrosis and I stumbled upon a problem regarding the title. I was wondering whether the title I made was grammatical. It was "Cytosis Fibrosis: A Hereditary ...
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6 views

All other and any other difference

Ramayana is more sacred than all other mythologies of Hindus. OR Ramayana is more sacred than any other mythology of Hindus. Which one is correct?
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26 views

Hyphenation of words like ‘waterproof’

The Oxford dictionary states that most compound adjectives made from a noun and an adjective should be hyphenated (e.g. ‘accident-prone’, ‘camera-ready’). On the other hand, its entry for the word ...
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24 views

participle adjectives

I'd like to ask for guidance on where paticipial adjectives should be placed. In the first sentence below, the past participle adjective is before the word that it modifies: 'broken chair.' But in ...
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46 views

What is a word for loving sadness?

I need a word for a love of sadness. A quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, for the feel. "Melancholy," I repeated. I liked the way it sounded, like there was music hidden somewhere inside it. (Kate ...
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42 views

Aramean vs. Aramaic?

What is the difference in usage between the adjectives Aramean and Aramaic? It seems that we use Aramaic to describe the language and Aramean to describe the people. But which one should we use to ...
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40 views

In “thin green candle”, can these adjectives be considered cumulative?

I have read that coordinate adjectives can be separated by commas, since both modify the noun, and cumulative adjectives cannot, since the first noun modifies the combination of the last adjective and ...
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24 views

Adjective meaning “community environment”

I'm trying to say something along the lines of: "Community environment factors include..." I do know that "community environment" is a noun and not an adjective, but I'm stumped for any other ...
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70 views

In the sentence “We do have free will.”, what does “free” stands for?

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective? Edit I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you ...
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47 views

whatever way that S+V

Is it grammatically wrong to include the relative pronoun of "that" between 'whatever way' and 'you look at it' in the following phrase in BBC News. The citizens of Glasgow lose out whatever way that ...
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25 views

Should less be repeated to clarify it applies to a series?

For a sentence like this: That setting results in a less firm and stable surface. Is it clear that less applies to both firm and stable or should it be repeated to avoid ambiguity between the ...
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73 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
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201 views

Irregular adjectives

Are there any other irregular adjectives except these ?
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48 views

use of “due to” or “becasue of” with modal verbs

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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54 views

Standard searchable term for “in person” (of a meeting)

For example, if I were to search Google for support groups and wanted to filter out everything that wasn't in person, what word is my best choice? The words "in" and "person" are individually too ...
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39 views

How to find the correct noun that a relative or adjective clause corresponds to?

Its easy to identify the correct noun when the clause modifying that particular noun is immediately followed. But how to identify the correct noun when the noun is not immediately followed by the ...
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119 views

Should I say “increased” is an adjective in the following sentence?

Is "increased" an adjective in the context which has come after the verb "get". Senselessness of leaders is getting increased. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you in advanced.
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87 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
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132 views

“Ventilated” brakes or “vented” brakes?

Automobile disc brakes with spacing or gaps separating the contact surfaces are commonly referred to as ventilated brakes. However, I've never heard the word "ventilated" outside of this context. ...
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83 views

How to use hyphen to form new adjectives?

Writing a chemistry paper I need to form an adjective for the following concept: TiO2 rich in oxygen vacancies. Is this the proper formation for an adjective intended to mean that?: ...
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72 views

Directions for comma use between adjectives as per various sources

I read a lot about when comma should be used between a list of adjectives modifying a noun that follows. There are a lotSo much so that now it all looks like a jumble of which adjectives sound better ...
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55 views

when “near” could be considered incorrect grammatically or semantically

Let's verify the word "nearby" is part of a constituent NP in the OP's #2 example: OP.2a. I live in a town nearby. <-- OP's #2 example it-clefts: OP.2b. It is [in a town nearby] that I live. ...
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63 views

What type of adjective is “aesthetic”?

(This is coming from a discussion over at ELL, but the specific nuance below fits here I think). Consider two statements about a dog: The dog has brown fur The dog has aesthetic appeal and two ...
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90 views

Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?

I've been trying to figure out if this slogan requires a comma: Simple, streaming music. versus Simple streaming music I did some reading on comma rules here and here, but I'm still a bit ...
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309 views

alternative to “high depth”, “large depth”

After having used "high depth" in a report, I consider it now almost as an oxymoron. But, is "large depth" better English? What would be an alternative adjective? (I'm not looking for the abyss as I ...
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150 views

“Oxford” comma with adjectives

Suppose you have some coordinate adjectives modifying a noun. E.g. "the cold, tired, hungry dog." You could rewrite this as "the cold and tired and hungry dog" but would these "the ...