Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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4answers
135 views

Is there an adjectival form for “good etiquette”?

For example, when we say someone has good courtesy, we can say they are courteous. Is there an analogous word for having good etiquette?
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0answers
26 views

Definition by example

Consider the following two ways of defining a chicken egg: An oval-shaped white object with a hard shell and soft interior containing albumin. An object that a chicken lays. These are really two ...
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1answer
31 views

and would be a professionally paid engagement

Which is correct? "This would be a professionally paid engagement." or "This would be a professional paid engagement." Maybe "professionally" as paid is a verb and "professionally" is an adverb? ...
3
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5answers
1k views

“Multiple different” or “different” or “multiple”

I have seen a lot of people using multiple different when only different or multiple would have conveyed the meaning just as well. Is this correct usage? I know that sometimes doubling the words is ...
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2answers
57 views

Aberrant usage of the adjective “incredulous”

Below is a sentence I found in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Could you please explain why the adjective "incredulous" is used as if it's an adverb? 'You sold the car?' she asked, ...
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17answers
3k views

Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person? [duplicate]

What is an appropriate term for a young person (child, or teenager) whose words and actions mimic that of a much older person from a previous generation? Such a youngster would demonstrate strong ...
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1answer
93 views
+50

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be ...
2
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2answers
41 views

“More loudly” vs “louder”. Correct usage

What is the correct usage of the adjective "loud"? Please sing louder Please sing more loudly I came across this in one of the quizzes at office, and as per them, the correct answer was option 2. ...
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2answers
75 views

How do you convert a noun into an adjective? [on hold]

What would be the adjectives for nouns like shopkeeper, country, wife, earring, teacher, father — and so on and so forth?
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20answers
5k views

What is a word for annoying behavior which decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?

I'm looking for a word which describes an annoying behavior that decreases the overall quality of a game or match, specifically in online gaming (Halo, Call of Duty, etc.) The behavior, while not ...
3
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4answers
15k views

Are “eery” and “eerie” equally acceptable spellings?

I used "eery" yesterday in a text and was corrected jokingly by my correspondent to "eerie." Looking at it after the fact, neither 'looks' right to me and both get through auto-correct with no red ...
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7answers
50k views

Is “over-exaggerated” correct English?

Isn't "exaggerated" enough? Is it right to say "over-exaggerated"?
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3answers
8k views

“As evidenced by” or “as evident by”?

I have this sentence: Group theory is one of my favourite areas in mathematics, as evidenced by the fact that I chose to do two group theory modules in my undergraduate course. I am wondering if ...
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3answers
1k views

Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word delicious whenever I like food. For example: This meat is so delicious! But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once ...
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3answers
62 views

“Evocative” vs. “provocative” [closed]

I am starting to use evocative and provocative interchangeably. I would like to understand the difference between these words and when one should be used instead of the other. although the ...
7
votes
9answers
891 views

Is there a word for “people who are computer illiterate”?

Just as there is "computerate" to describe those who show familiarity with, and ability to use computers, is there a word to describe the opposite, those who are computer illiterate? The word I'm ...
0
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2answers
63 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [on hold]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
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1answer
46 views

Is there a word for the opposing ends of a tangible scale, as there are “obverse” and “reverse” to describe the physical sides of a coin-like object [on hold]

I feel that obverse and reverse are too "Geometric" to properly describe more complex ideas in society where something is not in reality in a completely opposite position in relation to another. For ...
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0answers
36 views

Words describing extent/ degree of 'jeopardy?' [closed]

I am writing a letter to describe the future of a country is in serious jeopardy, in the sense that all cultures, economies, rules of games and so on will be lost in a second. Which adjectives I can ...
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3answers
3k views

Why is “busy” pronounced “bizzy”?

Of all the ways I could come up with to pronounce the word "busy", "bizzy" would be very low on my list. At least "bussy" or "boosy". Why "bizzy"?
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5answers
136 views

How do you describe something that has “just enough” details?

I want to describe something that is neither too broad and general, nor too detailed. It may be fit to just describe it as "a detailed analysis of so-and-so..", but I want to emphasize the fact that ...
2
votes
3answers
10k views

What is the correct usage of 'worse' and 'worst'?

I've noticed a lot of people who, according to the way I was taught, misuse the words 'worse' and 'worst'. The way I understand it, 'worse' is for comparisons, and 'worst' is the superlative. But more ...
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5answers
18k views

“Electronic” vs. “electric”

Most people would refer to computers as being electronic, whereas a flashlight would be described as electric. I know the general difference (electronic devices use transistors?), but what is it ...
13
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4answers
533 views

Rule for when to use “thin” versus “narrow”

My 5-year-old asked this morning if you would say a road was "thin" or "narrow". We had no difficulty telling her she should use "narrow" in that case, but couldn't explain why. We found it ...
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1answer
37 views

untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
2
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3answers
67 views

What is an adjective to describe something that caused a problem?

I have an error message that describes the cause for a problem/crash in my application. What is an adjective I can use to refer to that error message? I would like to say something like this: ...
2
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4answers
571 views

Is “[I am] possessed of impeccable grammar” correct, idiomatic, or ironic?

If it's a correct, non-idiomatic usage, is "possessed" an adjective, or...? What is "of" under that circumstance?
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1answer
31 views

Alternative to “wide-ranging” adjective for “audience” [closed]

What is a good adjective that describes an audience as coming from a wide spectrum of different backgrounds?
2
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6answers
87 views

Better than expected as an adjective?

Is there an adjective that can sum up "better than expected"? For example: "Progress was better than expected." Is there a single word I can use to describe what the progress was like? I'm looking ...
3
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2answers
81 views

Word to Warn of Danger of Usage

I need a term or word to refer to something which is very powerful but if used naïvely will cause great harm. I could say: "This is a [noun], use with care." or: "Use this with care it is ...
0
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2answers
969 views

Opened vs open?

Is there are rule when to use opened vs open? I always get confused even though I've been speaking English as the dominant language for more than half my life. E.g. Is the door open(ed)? ...
3
votes
5answers
95 views

What is a noun or adjective to describe somebody who juggles work, study, hobbies, family and more?

I'm trying to describe someone who burns the candle at both ends. They work full-time, they study full-time, they have creative projects on the go, they raise their family and manage their property - ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
2
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5answers
5k views

“Adaptable” vs. “flexible”

Are the words adaptable and flexible generally interchangeable? For example, do the following sentences have the same meaning? Older workers are less adaptable [...]. Older workers are less ...
2
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1answer
89 views

“Not only one of the most talented actors of our age but kind.” — what does 'kind' mean here?

I was searching for information about the original novel "House of Cards" and from following site, in the middile of the page, there's sentence which compliment Kevin Spicey as shown ...
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1answer
42 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Can “nice” when used about people mean “beautiful”? Can a nice woman be ugly?

Can nice used with a person be about his/her look? Can I use a nice woman and mean (sexually) attractive, like in a beautiful woman? Or is it always only about their behaviour and kindness, when used ...
2
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2answers
216 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
45
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18answers
15k views

Is there a word to describe someone who tends to disagree with others only to upset them?

What's the word to describe someone who acts arrogantly and always disagrees with others unreasonably in order to upset people around him/her? [I'm not looking for adjectives like unpleasant, ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Should this sentence use “is ambitious” or “is ambition”? [migrated]

Which of these two is better, and why: the first one with the adjective or the second one with the noun? I think the characteristic that best describes me is ambitious. I think the characteristic ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
2
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1answer
68 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
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2answers
40 views

Do we need hyphen in this: graded-reading books?

Is it necessary to have a hyphen in the following phrase? graded-reading books Please my friends you are only hope for me at a last chance salon because my teacher he is not knowing answer.
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6answers
13k views

Word for not knowing about something

I would like to know some word choices (can be a noun, adjective,...) for not knowing about something, with a positive connotation with a negative connotation in a neutral way For example, I ...
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2answers
93 views

Adjectival phrase using participles

The café smelt of fried onions and tomato ketchup; the tables were green Formica with chipped painted, steel legs. I am trying to use chipped and painted to form an adjectival phrase in this ...
1
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2answers
591 views

Looking for an adjective describing a system with small number of assumptions (or rules)

I am looking for a word that can be used to describe a system (or a model) with a small number of rules or assumptions. For example, the number of grammatical rules in Japanese is much lower than in ...
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1answer
61 views

The difference between medium and intermediate

I wish to know the difference between medium and intermediate. There is an academic use for me trying to describe a physical parameter (a coupling constant of interactions) which is not too strong, ...
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8answers
210 views

Is “unredactable” a word?

I googled it and even though it's been used on the Web, I can't find any entries for it on online dictionaries. If it's not a real word, then is there a good equivalent? The context is a record ...
4
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8answers
2k views

“Crack” as a positive noun?

Some Spanish speakers use the word crack as a positive noun. For example: Lionel Messi es un crack del football! Is it the same in English? Can I say: You're a crack?
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1answer
44 views

'susceptible of' vs 'susceptible to"

What are their similarities and differences? The definitions on http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/susceptible look similar: for example, A is 'influenced or affected' by B, ...