Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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112 views

Adjective for someone that tries to gloss over past insults?

This person would say things that wound you and then after an hour she comes to you all smiley and tries to make up for the things she said. Not in a serious manner but really lightheartedly, saying ...
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5answers
49 views

Is there an adjective to describe someone who feels the desire to run away from situations?

I'm looking for a word that could be used to describe a person in this way. E.g. "I'm feeling very ____ today"
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13answers
6k views

Adjective to describe someone who is knowledgeable, resolute, and calm

I have a situation/feeling that occurs to me frequently and I'm not sure what the adjective is to describe it (or if there even is one). I'd love to hear your ideas on the matter. The situation is ...
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1answer
23 views

When to use addicting vs. addictive?

We're having a debate in the kitchen about this. When would I use addicting vs addictive?
9
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4answers
2k views

What would you call a word that doesn't exist in or translate well into another language?

I've run into this situation several times, being a native Spanish speaker. There are some words you just can't translate into another language. Is there a particular word to describe this? I'm not ...
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2answers
16 views

Motive, Motivative, or Motivating?

What is the most fitting adjective to describe '(something) that motivates' among motive, motivative, and motivating? EDIT: Reading from the answers that 'motive' is not an adjective, actually I put ...
21
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4answers
5k views

Is the adjective “abject” ever found with any word other than “poverty”? Does it mean something other than “very” or “utterly”?

Reading over an answer at the Skeptics StackExchange, it occurred to me that I had never really seen the adjective abject used with any other word other than poverty. Has abject become inexorably ...
4
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2answers
52 views

Is `bonny' neutral register?

Dictionary definitions of `bonny' admit to chiefly British (or even Scots), but give no further hint of the possible tinges of this word. Bonny (adj.) means attractive, fair; fine, excellent [M-W]. ...
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5answers
129 views

What's a word that describes acting coldly to hide the fact that you are hurt?

Someone who acts cold and impassive to mask the fact that they are actually hurt. I've been trying to come up with the word for hours, but came up with nothing.
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1answer
123 views

Why isn't USA an attributive adjective, (but US is)?

When referring to the country, both US and USA (among other forms), are acceptable. But when used as an adjective, USA sounds wrong. US Army, but not USA Army. Even in the expanded form (for ...
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1answer
40 views

What's the origin/etymology of the phrase “regular old”? Does it have a clearly defined meaning?

It seems to me that the adjective phrase "regular old" seems to have a few distinct usages, but a confusing conversation and some fruitless searches as to a specific definition have me coming to ...
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6answers
112 views

Word for someone with the ability to change appearances

What's a word for someone having the ability to change their own or someone else's appearance? I've heard witch, pythoness, shapeshifter and siren, but any other words I'm missing?
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3answers
129 views

What adjective would you use for “not readable color”?

Imagine you received an email, which looks like this: I guess there's an adjective to express that either the background or the font color should be changed, because it's really hard to read. My ...
3
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1answer
70 views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
5
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4answers
1k views

Correct adjective form of the word “disperse”

I am writing an article related to the ionosphere and I would like to ask what form of the word disperse is right in the sentence: A significant majority of the error can be easily removed using ...
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0answers
22 views

Directions for comma use between adjectives as per various sources

I read a lot about when comma should be used between a list of adjectives modifying a noun that follows. There are a lotSo much so that now it all looks like a jumble of which adjectives sound better ...
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3answers
66 views

“more than usual” vs. “more than usually”

Which sentence is correct? "I had more customers than usual." "I had more customers than usually." "More than usual" sounds pretty common, but "more than usually" seems more correct when I think ...
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2answers
83 views

What part of speech is 'closer' functioning as in 'I moved closer'?

'I moved closer.' At face value, 'closer' seems to be acting like an adjective; however, I don't see anything in the sentence to which it can refer. A friend suggested that 'to move closer', 'to ...
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1answer
91 views

Is there a term for adjectives that don't, at face value, seem to apply to the noun modified?

There's a verse in Bob Seger's song Mainstreet that has this wonderful little seemingly-nonsensical word pairing: There was this long, lovely dancer in a little club downtown; I loved to watch ...
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4answers
9k views

How do you say “three times a month” in one word?

We say semimonthly when we describe something happening twice a month. for example "a semimonthly publication", "a semimonthly meeting", etc. Is there any word we can use to describe something that ...
0
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4answers
59 views

Is there a word for someone/group of people that intentionally ignore an issue caused by them?

I'm looking for a word/phrase similar to 'turning a blind eye' to describe someone/a group of people who intentionally ignore a problem caused by them because it's easier to ignore it than deal with ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Can 'repeat' be an adjective?

I was sure the word 'repeat' could be an adjective; for example, the phrase "repeat performance" describes a performance that is repeated. To my surprise, however, the Random House dictionary and ...
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10answers
6k views

adjective that means “someone who puts people down”

I was just thinking about someone I went to school with who had a penchant for putting people down, and I was trying to think of a word that describes this, but couldn't find it. It would be a synonym ...
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3answers
25 views

Same adjective for two nouns

The government placed restrictions on both diesel fuel and diesel engines. Here I dont want to repeat the diesel. I cannot write: The government placed restrictions on both diesel fuel and ...
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4answers
2k views

Why is “biblical” the only proper adjective to not use upper case?

Generally, when an adjective is derived from a proper noun, the adjective also has a capital initial, hence Googleable, Mancunian, British, and Shavian. (In contrast, verbs are not given capitals, ...
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3answers
308 views

Part of speech of “brief” and “short” in the phrases “in brief” and “in short”

The phrases "in brief" and "in short" function as adverbs, but as what part of speech do "brief" and "short" function in these phrases? "Brief" stands alone as both a noun and adjective and could be ...
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4answers
102 views

What is the correct way to use an intensifier followed by an adjective and then a plural noun? I am specifically interested in the intensifier, “too”

Example: You should not place too high expectations on your children. Using the phrase, "such high expectations"seems to change the meaning slightly. I´m familiar with the construction too+ adj.+ a+ ...
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4answers
3k views

What's the distinction between “nonessential” and “inessential”?

I'm revising a text that uses the word "nonessential", but my ear is telling me "inessential." Usually when there are two very similar words like this, there is some subtle (or not so subtle) ...
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1answer
24 views

Is there a collateral adjective for 'game'?

I was looking for an adjective that would describe anything game-like that is either taken directly from Ancient Greek or Latin. 'Ludic' comes to mind, but it came to assume the same connotations as ...
0
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1answer
50 views

“to-know-each-other” or “knowing-each-other”

We gave the new members a to-know-each-other break. We gave the new members a knowing-each-other break. What it means is: the boy came back to the break that was scheduled so that guests had ...
0
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1answer
36 views

'Accessory' vs 'included' as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word 'accessory' as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like 'This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones'? I feel that 'This DJ ...
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1answer
85 views

Adjective form of the verb despise?

Saw the title of the movie where minions come out - "Despicable Me" - I was curious, as despicable has the suffix -able, what would be its verb form? Then, I thought, is it de-spice? Which made me ...
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1answer
39 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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4answers
14k views

“Ground floor” vs. “first floor”

Is the bottom-most floor (on ground level not the basement) "ground floor" or "first floor" in America?
7
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3answers
11k views

What is the difference between “fine” and “good”?

What is the difference between fine and good? Please suggest the proper usage.
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3answers
82 views

What's the appropriate word for someone that's leaving something?

What's the most appropriate word for someone that's leaving something (or somewhere)? For example, if someone leaves an association permanently, what do I call him? The term will be used in a ...
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2answers
44 views

Use of noun vs. adjective in store signs [closed]

I saw the following on a store sign in a foreign country. EXCELLENCE IN HAND DRIP COFFEE Isn't it better to use adjective as in EXCELLENT HAND DRIP COFFEE ?
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10answers
4k views

Synonym for “focused”

I'm looking for a better adjective that means focused in the sense of "intense concentration" like an elite warrior in battle. I guess it doesn't even need the sense of having blinders on, more about ...
2
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1answer
77 views

“Undersize” as an adjective? Where did the “d” go?

As I was reading this article, I came across the word "undersize" being used three separate times as an adjective. I was confused, as I don't think I've ever seen that word used that way before (or at ...
2
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2answers
170 views

“My late friends” — they're not dead!

Context: We're discussing about how we used to get penalized in school for being late to classes, many years ago. I wanted to say: In my old school, it was hilarious to see my late friends get ...
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2answers
52 views

Adjective/ Collocation with 'Caution:' — Why does 'huge' sound odd?

Simon Johnson, Scottish Political Editor, The Telegraph UK, 11:08PM BST 07 May 2015: Nicola Sturgeon: I'm treating exit poll with huge caution Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: “I’d treat the exit poll ...
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1answer
42 views

What is the difference (if any) between common interests and interests in common?

Is there any difference between "common interests" and "interests in common"? One can certainly ask: "Do you have any interests in common?" Can you also ask: "Do you, guys, have any ...
6
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4answers
307 views

Adjective to describe “just because… doesn't necessarily mean…”

This is one of those phrases used very commonly (and apparently subject to lots of scrutiny on this website), but is difficult to define and also far too long to submit to a reverse dictionary. Let's ...
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4answers
65 views

Is there a word for the opposite of being hollow?

I'm looking for an adjective that describes an object that, rather than is just the outside, is instead just the inside. Searching for antonyms of hollow, I have only found the word solid, which ...
9
votes
6answers
1k views

“Finnish Swedes” or “Swedish Finns”?

In Finland, there live 5.6 % Swedes (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/fi.html). They have lived there for many generations, being standard Finnish citizens, just ...
2
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1answer
56 views

Is the phrase “collaborative skills” appropriate/correct in this context?

If one were to suggest that they had "...strong documentation, collaborative, and communication skills." My first thought is that it's a bit more awkward than saying ...
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2answers
72 views

Is integratable a correct adjective for 'capable of integration'?

I'm looking for an adjective that captures the meaning of 'capable of integration' in a systems/software context (so not integrable in mathematical context). Integratable seems to be somewhat in use, ...
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3answers
72 views

How to say a person is a star of something or some activity? [closed]

How can we call a person who has excelled in some event, a sort of a star in it?
2
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2answers
71 views

The quality of things you stick with

I was wondering if there is a word in English to describe the quality of things we stick with. For example, if a training is well designed, people will tend to keep using it. Meanwhile, if it's not, ...
0
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1answer
50 views

“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...