Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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833 views

Recordkeeping, record keeping, or record-keeping

In the following sentence, a reviewer claimed that record keeping is a spelling error that should be corrected to recordkeeping. Service providers shall manage information using agreed upon ...
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3answers
33 views

Person who has had a program hard wired into their daily routine

What is the best word to describe a person that has done the same thing contractually for a long period of time, to the point in which they still carry out these tasks without being specifically ...
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3answers
44 views

What is the opposite of a catalyst?

A catalyst is a compound which allows a chemical reaction to occur without undergoing a chemical change itself. Thus it is not 'used up' when performing its function. Thus the word catalyst is a ...
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2answers
70 views

Negative Comparatives & Superlatives

An Adjective can, in general, be converted to Comparative (-er) & Superlative (-est) ; for example : good better best happy happier happiest Now Superlative means "Highest in quality", ...
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2answers
714 views

“Almost-finished” versus “almost finished”

I am attaching an almost-finished version of the report. I am attaching an almost finished version of the report. Which is the preferred form, (1) or (2)? Why?
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23answers
5k views

Adjective describing a person who has lots of children, not “fertile”

Is there a single adjective that means "this person has lots of children"? Context: I'm not actually talking about a person. I'm talking about a data structure in a computer program, where objects ...
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1answer
40 views

What's the word for 'new yet old'? [on hold]

I am trying to think of the word that describes something that is new yet old, contemporary yet classic, progressive yet traditional or any other similar meanings. The word is used to describe a ...
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8answers
9k views

Word for sadness at something ending, but excited about new

Is there a word that describes the combination of feeling sad for an ending of something, but excited at new prospects. The closest I had was "bittersweet change" Examples: 1) At the end of a ...
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3answers
1k views

Hot is to heat as cold is to

Can you please fill in the blank? Hot is to heat as cold is to.... In other words, what is the noun for "cold"?
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4answers
412 views

adjective describing a personal difficulty

Trying to think of a word that describes an action that is easily accomplished by most people yet said person cannot. Example: Since fifth grade, I have played the bass in my school orchestra, ...
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2answers
39 views

Fictional vs. Fiction

I apologize in advance if my question has been asked before: there's this club I know called the "Fiction Film Club", and while I know it's used here to specify what kind of film and that sometimes ...
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2answers
424 views

Is the word “bespoke” associated with Southern American English, kind of how “bonafied” is in my mind? [on hold]

Is bespoke associated with the American South, as "bonafied" (bona fide, properly) is to me? When I hear the latter, it brings to mind aristocratic Southern gentlemen sipping mint juleps; when I hear ...
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1answer
50 views

Is it correct to say “I think sth important”?

I know that I can say: I consider this idea important. I deem this film stupid. I regard my health as important. But can I say: I think money/health/love/etc. important. Or does it ...
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3answers
348 views

A word describes the person who tends to stereotype people

Is there a word/adjective (single word) that describes the person who likes consiously or uncousiously to stereotype people? I was thinking that there might be a word such as stereotypist, but such a ...
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7answers
2k views

Is a lengthy combination of words with hyphens like “the worst not-technically-in-a-recession year in American history” a new fashion of writing?

I found a hyphenated word , “not-technically–in-a-recession” in the sentence of September 28 New York Times’ article titled “Why Obama Is Winning,” written by co-ed columnist, Ross Douthat. It reads: ...
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1answer
52 views

Is “soliciting” in the example sentence an adjective or a noun? [closed]

In the following sentence, I would like to understand if the word "soliciting" is a noun or an adjective. "Is my reluctance that soliciting?" Here, the word "soliciting" appears to be a kind of ...
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5answers
5k views

“Undistinguishable” vs. “indistinguishable”

Is there a difference between these two words? To me, it seems that undistinguishable is more where you can't tell what it is, and indistinguishable seems to be where they're the same. It seems a lot ...
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2answers
46 views

Use of “play” followed by an adjective

English is my second language so there are a lot of new things to me. I just came across several sentences containing the phrases "play dead", "play sick" and "play cute" so I wonder if the verb ...
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3answers
2k views

What's the antonym of “serendipitous”?

What's the antonym of "serendipitous"? I couldn't find any anywhere.
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1answer
46 views

Analyzing 'as' in ascertain, assure, etc

It seems that in some words, like in the word 'ascertain' or in 'assure', the 'a' or the combination of 'a' and 's' transforms the adjective into a verb. My question is, is there a term in the ...
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1answer
30 views

How should I join the following sentence so it becomes an adjective?

Wow, that was the most philosophical I-don't-care-that-you're-not-a-virgin explanation I've ever heard. Should I write it like this? Or should I omit some words?
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5answers
7k views

Word for a person who lives in the past

Someone who is highly nostalgic and is stuck in the past, better days
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21answers
8k views

Is there a word that means cheating but legitimate?

Is there a word that means cheating and legitimate at the same time? For example: I play a quiz game and set the number of questions to one. So, I get 100% of my answers correct. That's cheating, ...
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1answer
61 views

Abdominal; Why isn't it 'abdomenal' (with an 'e'), and is there a name for such words?

Why is the word 'abdominal' formed of an altered spelling of 'abdomen'? I have noticed other words similar, but none spring to mind; is there a name for them?
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2answers
371 views

A noun to describe character sequences between words

I'm creating a formal system in which a sentence can be formed by four types of sequences of characters: Words Prefixes Suffixes Sequences in between words What noun would you use to describe a ...
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3answers
551 views

What do you call someone who always talks a situation in their favor?

What do you call someone who always talks a situation in their favor? For example, Tom tells Mary that she has a piece of meat stuck in between her teeth. Mary replies "Oh I purposely left it there". ...
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1answer
557 views

Adjectives that describe the general shape of fishes

My question has to do with the adjectives one can use to describe the very general shape of a fish if we think of these three axes: tail-to-head axis back-to-belly axis side-to-side axis Question ...
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2answers
411 views

How to describe an individual who always speaks in a “matter of fact” manner

I have a friend who always speaks in a very matter-of-fact manner. On numerous occasions, he has mentioned how it was "the best BLANK" he has ever had, or "the best BLANK in the city." Everything ...
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2answers
290 views

How to describe humanities students in one word

In several languages, there is a specific, usually rather derogatory word for students of the humanities. Would it be necessary to stick to 'arts students' or 'humanities students' to point out these ...
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1answer
2k views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
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3answers
352 views

What is the right description of the word “squeaky” in “squeaky clean”?

Is squeaky in "squeaky clean" an onomatopoeia? Is there a right word to describe this word, other than simply an "adjective"? It's something that uses the description of a sound as an adjective. ...
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1answer
110 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...
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6answers
127 views

Something that is impossible but has happened [closed]

I would like to know if anyone knows the word for something that should be impossible but has happened. An example is the Big Bang Theory. It shouldn't have been possible but something happened for us ...
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3answers
2k views

Is there an adjectival form of “levity”?

Can anybody tell me the adjectival form of levity? I've found levitious here, but not sure whether it’s a dictionary word.
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1answer
34 views

'Accessory' vs 'included' as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word 'accessory' as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like 'This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones'? I feel that 'This DJ ...
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7answers
1k views

Word to describe someone who rarely gets upset

Is there a word to describe someone who rarely or almost never gets upset/angry? The words that first came to my mind were non-confrontational and stoic, and though they relate, they are not exactly ...
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1answer
68 views

Adjective form of the verb despise?

Saw the title of the movie where minions come out - "Despicable Me" - I was curious, as despicable has the suffix -able, what would be its verb form? Then, I thought, is it de-spice? Which made me ...
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8answers
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Antonym: “repetitive”

Let's say there's a video game that never gets boring no matter how much you play it, because there's always something new to do in it. What would be a term to describe the game? The opposite would ...
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5answers
3k views

Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?

I want to create a poster titled "An Incomplex Introduction to Complexity-based Cryptography." As you see, it contrasts the words incomplex and complexity. (Words like simple or easy do not provide ...
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1answer
31 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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3answers
359 views

Term for things like “naughty step” where the step is not what is naughty

Can anyone remind me of the grammatical term for the apparent misapplication of an attributive adjective, as in the phrase "the naughty step" (where it is not the step itself that is naughty but the ...
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1answer
292 views

What is the proper adjective form, if any, of apothecary?

What is the proper adjective form, if any, of apothecary? My best guess is 'apothecal', although my resources have not found a definitive answer one way or the other. For example: Jordan ...
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15answers
73k views

What is the adjective form for the word “integrity?”

I'm looking for the adjective form of "integrity." Instead of "Be a person of integrity," I'd like to say something like "Be [one word I'm looking for]" I did a Google search for this, but I also ...
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5answers
623 views

Adjective for something that can be responded to

What is an adjective for something that can be responded to? I tried respondable but it looks like it isn't in the dictionary and it felt wrong anyway. Update: I need to use it in the context of ...
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5answers
92 views

What is the adjective meaning “great in area”?

We have length → long volume → voluminous But what is the corresponding adjective for "area"? I've found "areal", but it seems that this means "pertaining to an area", rather than "having area" ...
2
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1answer
54 views

“Undersize” as an adjective? Where did the “d” go?

As I was reading this article, I came across the word "undersize" being used three separate times as an adjective. I was confused, as I don't think I've ever seen that word used that way before (or at ...
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5answers
11k views

What is the difference between “owing to” and “due to”?

"Due to" seems more common than "owing to" in modern English. Is "owing to" simply an old-fashioned way of saying the same thing, or is there a rule to using it?
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2answers
78 views

Term for “brain-watering”

A mouth can water, but what does a brain do? I'm looking for a term that implies intellectual thirst, as when one has worked all day at a mindless task and only wants to read a novel, or essay, or ...
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3answers
1k views

Connotations of “quixotic”

Would you say quixotic has more of a positive connotation or more of a negative connotation? The definition for quixotic given by Merriam-Webster is: hopeful or romantic in a way that is not ...
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1answer
640 views

Water : Aquatic :: Sand : xxx?

Just as aquatic is to water and aerial is to air, what is an equivalent word for sand (or earth, I suppose)? For context, I’m trying to describe the locomotion of worms within desert sand (as opposed ...