Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
1answer
185 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
49
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the etymology of “yellow”, and why is it so different in other European languages?

It seems like most of our names for colors come from our German roots (blue/blau, green/grün, red/rot, etc.). But yellow is gelb in German, amarillo in Spanish, jaune in French, and giallo in Italian. ...
2
votes
2answers
46 views

Is “People exercising everyday are healthy” wrong?

Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right? People exercising everyday are healthy. or do I need to use ...
-1
votes
3answers
48 views

Adjectives that describe the language used in a literary text

In order to analyse a poem, I often need to comment on the diction used. So far, I've been using words, such as colloquial, everyday,simple. Could you provide some adjectives that describe the ...
6
votes
4answers
9k views

“How far” vs “How long”

I am not clear how to use "How long" and "How far". Suppose I got in a taxi or cab to my hotel, how should I say to the driver if I want to know the distance to the hotel? Which of the following is ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Which preposition to use with “unbecoming”?

It is easy when you say something becomes or unbecomes someone. In this case, no preposition is needed. It is another story when the verb turns into the adjective “(un)becoming”. I would like to ...
3
votes
4answers
8k views

“Demonstratable” — a dictionary word, or just a well known hack?

Someone has just pointed out a mis-spelling on my site - demonstratable, as in "demonstratable experience of...". I can't see it in the New Oxford American Dictionary or the Oxford Dictionary of ...
2
votes
4answers
164 views
+50

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...
2
votes
3answers
55 views

Is there any particular rule for specific colours in adjective order?

I read here that there is a general rule to write an adjective order. But I didn't find any explanation if the rule has a specific order for colours, especially for primary colours. This may sound ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

Synonyms for “untilted”

In a physical/technical context, I (being not a native speaker) am looking for an adjective that describes the absence of tilt and found “untilted”, which seems however not widely used. More ...
11
votes
4answers
721 views

An adjective for the condition of a used brush

What adjective best describes the weariness and disarrangement that starts to show in your toothbrush when you've used it for some time? Nothing severe; just a little out of shape: It doesn't have ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

What is a word for “giving more meaning to something than it deserves?”

Or something that tries to convey more meaning to you than it deserves to. It's an adjective similar to "condescending." I'm almost certain the word starts with an "e."
0
votes
7answers
9k views

Use of the word “referable”

Can the word "referable" be used to denote something that can be referenced and what is the difference between "referable" and "referenceable"?
1
vote
3answers
50 views

usage of “nasty”

I want to describe a little girl who behaves bad. she breaks everything, scares poor animals and can even make an ogre cry. Can I use the term 'nasty' when speak about her? About a child? (She is a ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
0
votes
2answers
134 views

phrase or theory that describes “if he can do it then so can I”

What is the phrase or psychological term that describes someone who gains confidence based off of another's performance? Moreover, they use it as a motivational foundation and it relates to behavioral ...
-5
votes
0answers
31 views

Leaving his routine of wives and children [closed]

Please I plead with you answer this question because it is my homework
1
vote
2answers
33 views

what adjective would describe a person that only does righteous things when they have to?

They don't do it because they want to, but only when no one else can or are able to. They only do it because they have to, because they're told to.
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Degrees of comparison [duplicate]

I believe, both variants are possible: friendlier / more friendly; and the friendliest / the most friendly. I'd like to know what is used in every day speech more often and which is more formal. ...
2
votes
4answers
79 views

What's the one word for a person who generalizes everything? [on hold]

I am searching for a word which qualifies a person as someone who makes sweeping generalizations on almost everything and tends to stereotype people. He picks up one trait of a person(something which ...
3
votes
6answers
1k views

Is there an adjective for having and spitting lots of saliva, especially in a state of wild, raging abandon?

I'm looking for a word that describes this happy fellow: source: imgur.com I don't think frothing is the right word. It isn't froth or foam, but sticky wads of spit.
25
votes
6answers
21k views

“Extensible” vs. “extendible”

Where does the adjective form extensible come from and does it connote anything different than extendible? What's the difference, if any, between the two?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Can [adjective] [noun] ever describe a broader set than [noun]?

In phrases of the form [adjective] [noun], the adjective is often being used to narrow the set described by the noun alone. For example, "red cars" narrows the set of cars to only include ones that ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Live curious or live curiously? [closed]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
3
votes
2answers
99 views

Unknown addiction [closed]

If I am addicted to something, but I do not know what I am addicted to, is there such a word to describe that? Is it appropriate to use "unknown" addiction, since I am not aware of it? Is there ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

hungry is to starving as thirsty is to? [closed]

When someone is very hungry we say he is starving. How to describe someone who is very thirsty?
3
votes
6answers
143 views

Can something be more unique than something else? Can something be very unique? [duplicate]

Family debate - one says that uniqueness is relative, others say something either is or is not unique. Does uniqueness mean that there is only one of a certain thing/person, so that it would mean more ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

“More loudly” vs “louder”. Correct usage

What is the correct usage of the adjective "loud"? Please sing louder Please sing more loudly I came across this in one of the quizzes at office, and as per them, the correct answer was option 2. ...
0
votes
3answers
80 views

Is “not very” considered polite? [closed]

I've heard that if you want to describe something in a negative way but polity, use "not very" + "negative" adj. For example, describing a bad thing would be: This is not very good. Or talking ...
0
votes
4answers
94 views

A specific word for stating something so obvious it is not useful to state

For example, answering the question "what is this?" with an overly literal response.The word I am trying to remember would be used in the phrase "Not to be XXX but unexpected events are unexpected. ...
1
vote
4answers
56 views

“watch more realistic 3D scenes” & hyphen

Problem: "viewers can watch more realistic 3D scenes and interact..." Do I need to hyphenate "more realistic" here? I think I do, as the compound modifier "more realistic" is modifying "3D ...
4
votes
1answer
148 views

What can come after a Possessive Adjective?

This sentence: "Today's my breakfast" means: "Today is my breakfast" But if it is written like: "My today's breakfast" it would mean: "The breakfast I eat today" (literal). "Today" then acts ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

Is integratable a correct adjective for 'capable of integration'?

I'm looking for an adjective that captures the meaning of 'capable of integration' in a systems/software context (so not integrable in mathematical context). Integratable seems to be somewhat in use, ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Use of the adjective “young” in the comparative form

Is correct to use the adjective "young" for objects? For example, in a sentence like this: "This painting is younger than that one.", I think it would be better to use "new" for "painting", but then, ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun?

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun, as in the following sentence: "The older told him to stop." Or do I have to use "one", as in: "The older one told him to stop." Thanks in advance!
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Adjective meaning “community environment”

I'm trying to say something along the lines of: "Community environment factors include..." I do know that "community environment" is a noun and not an adjective, but I'm stumped for any other ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Repeat Adverb in a list or is one time enough?

[1] ...., which is less efficient and secure against ... [2] ...., which is less efficient and less secure against ... Is it necessary to mention "less" two times as shown in version [2] or is ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

“strongly” or “strong”?

Is strongly correct in the following, or should it be strong? ... and had a strongly Protestant and unionist identity. What is the explanation in grammar terms? Context.
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Can an adjective be converted into a noun by '-s'?

I saw a passage "this doesn't mean to get riches and honors." 'rich' is an adjective but 'riches' is a plural noun according to the dictionary. Are there any other examples where an adjective becomes ...
0
votes
1answer
343 views

Changing a person's name into an adjective

What do you call it when a person's name or group's name is changed into a adjective? Is it "conversion" or "functional shift"? For instance, saying a band's music is "Beatlesque" or that someone's ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

“…the pleasure enjoyed” – placement of adjective?

A person should not think that happiness is the total pleasure enjoyed. In this sentence, "enjoyed" comes after the subject it describes, even though it is not a phrase or clause. I thought only ...
1
vote
4answers
117 views

Word to describe something which exists both in the mortal world and the afterlife?

I'm trying to find an adjective to describe something - a thing, concept or idea - that transcends the empiric "mortal" world and exists in the afterlife. Specifically, the word should describe the ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Word that describes something that performs as advertised or expected

I'm looking for a specific word, but I can't remember what it was. It begins with "a" I believe, and its definition is something along the lines of "successful in its endeavor, successful in its ...
0
votes
2answers
27 views

Someone is a … user of a something, to say he is using it daily or a lot?

Is it correct to refer to someone who is using something a lot, by 'a big user of ...'. I'm talking here specially about software usage. Is there an accurate word ?
1
vote
1answer
103 views

“It's 20 meters thick” versus “It's a 20-meter-thick layer.”

I know that both of these expressions are correct, but I'd like to be able to explain exactly why the first one is correct. Of course compound adjectives are hyphenated (second expression), but in the ...
6
votes
3answers
12k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
7
votes
2answers
18k views

Usage of “symmetrical” and “symmetric”

What is the appropriate usage of "symmetrical" and "symmetric" (using the geometrical adjectival definition of both terms)? Are they synonymous?
4
votes
4answers
119 views

culturally accepted adjectival antonym of 'non sequitur' [closed]

If one were to coin the adjective 'sequitur' as an antonym of 'non sequitur', would this be generally understood in English? 'Sequitur' is currently an accepted English noun meaning 'conclusion.' ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Can I say “I am glad hearing from you” or it is wrong? [closed]

I am glad hearing from you. Is it correct? And does it have a real meaning or it doesn't?
2
votes
2answers
99 views

'likely' and 'probable'

Although I am not a native English speaker, I do feel that a 'likely event' is at least slightly more 'likely' than a 'probable event'. Merriam-Webster's dictionary seems to agree with me. likely 1) ...