Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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What do you call someone who takes but doesn't want to give?

What do you call someone who takes but doesn't want to give? I just don't know the appropriate adjective to use to be honest.
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2answers
39 views

Non-sea salt sulfate or non-sea-salt sulfate?

Atmospheric sea salt particles contain sulfate but also other sources of atmospheric sulfate exist. In scientific studies on particulate sulfate air pollution it is common to split between sulfate ...
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1answer
12 views

“The” before adjectives

I'm a bit confused about this. Which example is the right one? From all the fellow writers, who was the best? From all fellow writers, who was the best? Is there a reason why "the" should be used ...
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1answer
27 views

If “nice” is an adjective, what kind of word is “niceness”?

Say you have the adjective "nice". If something is nice, then it has the quality of niceness. What type of word is "niceness"? Is it still an adjective?
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2answers
5k views

“each day” → “daily”; “every other day” →?

Is there an adjective that means "every other day"? I found "bidaily" but it seems to mean "twice a day", not "every second day" (not even both as "biweekly" does). I'd need this word to very ...
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2answers
71 views

Does English have an equivalent for pinakalast?

Last from English; final, ultimate, last person to arrive. pinaka- creates superlatives. Though pinakalast can be both comparative and superlative. More final than final Most ultimate
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2answers
1k views

Looking for an adjective describing a system with small number of assumptions (or rules)

I am looking for a word that can be used to describe a system (or a model) with a small number of rules or assumptions. For example, the number of grammatical rules in Japanese is much lower than in ...
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1answer
35 views

Adjective phrase/clause to describe the object of the sentence

Am I using the adjective phrase correctly in the following sentence? "I want to be someone like you, smart and beautiful." I know that using the adjective phrase to describe the subject of the ...
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1answer
36 views

Old or older people

Which is grammatically correct? Old people are often lonely. Or Older people are often lonely. I understand context matters. I just want to know when it is right to use one or the other.
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2answers
30 views

An adjective to describe the state of being complex yet ineffective

Looking for candidate adjectives to be used for describing an (engineering) method or procedure that is overly complicated and demanding but provides no additional benefit in return. In fact the ...
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1answer
45 views

Word for a male aged 20 through 25 [duplicate]

I'm trying to come up with a word that describes a male aged from 20 through 25. Man feels too adult like and Young Adult feels like a teenager. The type of word I'm looking for is someone not yet ...
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1answer
19 views

“Proceeding” as an adjective [on hold]

I thought I've heard it being used as such before, but I cannot seem to find any dictionary (online) that details it as an adjective. E.g. "The proceeding event is dinner. The preceding event was ...
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13answers
8k views

Synonym for “focused”

I'm looking for a better adjective that means focused in the sense of "intense concentration" like an elite warrior in battle. I guess it doesn't even need the sense of having blinders on, more about ...
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0answers
24 views

Hyphenation of words like ‘waterproof’

The Oxford dictionary states that most compound adjectives made from a noun and an adjective should be hyphenated (e.g. ‘accident-prone’, ‘camera-ready’). On the other hand, its entry for the word ...
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2answers
39 views

Synonyms for “untilted”

In a physical/technical context, I (being not a native speaker) am looking for an adjective that describes the absence of tilt and found “untilted”, which seems however not widely used. More ...
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5answers
2k views

Better than expected as an adjective?

Is there an adjective that can sum up "better than expected"? For example: "Progress was better than expected." Is there a single word I can use to describe what the progress was like? I'm looking ...
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1answer
28 views

When to use articles before adjectives in a sentence?

I am struggling a bit with when I need to use a/an/the before adjective followed by a noun. I understand the rules for articles in general but I discovered that this particular case is always ...
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0answers
23 views

participle adjectives

I'd like to ask for guidance on where paticipial adjectives should be placed. In the first sentence below, the past participle adjective is before the word that it modifies: 'broken chair.' But in ...
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0answers
39 views

Is the phrase “Disintegrated explosively” correct? [closed]

I'm asking to check if the sentence is correct in terms of semantics or grammar or in any other way. For example, in a sci-fi piece, the sentence where it can be used is, He landed on a rock. It ...
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0answers
30 views

How can I describe a relationship between two characters whereby one character has much control over the other? [on hold]

I have three types of character relationships (all between two characters) that I need to be able to describe: 1) One character (who is in control) belittles the other (who seems to be defenceless) ...
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2answers
1k views

What is another way of saying “less premium?”

I'm looking for another way to say "less premium." This is the context: The competition's brand was less premium. I do not want to change the overall structure of the sentence. This is not a ...
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13answers
2k views

Is there a word to describe an individual who has complete control over his negative and positive emotions?

Let's say examples of negative emotions are sadness and despair, and example of positive emotions are happiness and pride. So is there a word that describes a person who has total, complete control ...
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3answers
89 views

'I like their another app!' - 'Other' versus 'another'; grammatical usage

I am helping a foreign language partner with English, but she asked me a question that stumped me. If I understand correctly, 'Other' is an adjective. 'Another' is also an adjective. Theoretically, ...
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0answers
41 views

Can “yet” modify adjective? [closed]

I think it can, but I am not sure. For example: He's the lord in the yet functioning duchy of [duchyName] (I am trying to imply that while the duchy is still present, it may crumble in the ...
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1answer
39 views

How to differentiate agents that cause harm but may or may not have the intent of doing so?

If I harm someone/something without having the intent to do so, am I being aggressive, hostile, or something else? What if I had the intent? I'm looking for ways to describe and differentiate agents ...
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3answers
1k views

Alternative phrase to “highly paid job”

James: I make 10000 USD a month. Alice: Wow, you have a highly paid job. Is the phrase “highly paid job” correct? I think yes, but also wish to ask the native speakers here. I assume that ...
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1answer
295 views

Why are some “-ist” suffixed words used as the adjective form over the more common “-istic”?

Generally speaking, for any kind of "-ism", the suffix "-ist" produces the noun form and "-istic" produces the adjective form. But there are some "-ist" suffixes that are acceptable or even more ...
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0answers
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Adverbs for non-gradable and base adjectives

I'd like to ask which adverbs should we use for non-gradable and base adjectives. For example : environmental When I read my book, it says : Non-gradable adjectives are not used with adverbs ...
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2answers
44 views

Word to Describe Exploitation of Elderly

I am looking for a word(s) that describes someone who deceives/takes advantage of an old person to get that old person to name him as his caretaker, POA, successor trustee of his trust, etc. Sample ...
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2answers
206 views

Difference between 'melancholic' and adjective 'melancholy'?

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives melancholy and melancholic? Can they be used interchangeably? The Oxford Learner's Dictionaries define them as follows: melancholy ...
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21answers
22k views

What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between

For example: 1) In statistics, this attribute will always either be 0% or 100%, never in-between. 2) The boundary is either safe or destroyed, because there is never a state where it is only ...
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1answer
42 views

Adjective for someone who only bases their love upon what others look like? [closed]

What is a good adjective to describe someone who only cares about looks, and only bases their love upon what others look like? ex. Romeo in Romeo and Juliet
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0answers
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I'm trying to describe a sound i.e. a popping sound which is metallic. How do I phrase such a sound?

The best I could come up with is Metallic Pop which doesn't suit the rest of the writing style at all, which has a bit more imaginative use of adjectives. What other phrase could I use to describe ...
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2answers
71 views

Is “specieal” an adjective for species?

I'm trying to find an adjective for the word species. Usage could be: The zoo tried to maintain specieal diversity. Is specieal the correct adjective for species or is there another word? Edit: ...
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6answers
496 views

What is a noun for “one who is responsible”?

The word "responsible" works as an adjective only. What is a noun for a person who bears some responsibility (i.e. is accountable for something)? Note: Originally my question was longer, but the ...
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2answers
140 views

Why do people write “women characters” but not “children actors”?

In certain feminist circles, including major publications, it is politically correct to write "women characters" instead of "female characters". But why is the word "women" pluralized? Why is it ...
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17answers
1k views

An adjective to describe a person who has come back from failure

I am attempting to find an adjective to describe someone who has rebounded from failure and come back even stronger. The ___ man came back, worked harder, then succeeded after missing the game ...
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0answers
41 views

What is a word for loving sadness?

I need a word for a love of sadness. A quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, for the feel. "Melancholy," I repeated. I liked the way it sounded, like there was music hidden somewhere inside it. (Kate ...
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4answers
52k views

“Plausible” vs. “possible”

I am looking to find the difference between possible and plausible. Here is what Apple's dictionary gives for each word: Possible: Able to be done; within the power or capacity of someone or ...
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2answers
37 views

Adjective for a type of conversation where no real information is conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection.

There is an english word (adj) that refers to a type of conversation where no real real information is being conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection. A casual conversation ...
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13answers
37k views

What is a good replacement for “ununderstandable”?

I want to tell a colleague of mine I'm doing something that will prevent her from getting "ununderstandable" errors. I have: ...so that you will not get unnecessary, [ununderstandable] errors. ...
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2answers
73 views

Is “aging” an adjective?

In the phrase the aging woman is aging an adjective or a verb used as an adjective?
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1answer
51 views

Meaning of “Busted” as an adjective [closed]

What does "busted" mean in this context? He also possesses a glass eye, an ear for heavy metal, and a busted internal radar. In reference to character Michael Burry from the movie "The Big ...
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1answer
43 views

I washed the dishes clean

Firstly, is "I washed the dishes clean." a grammatically correct sentence? If it is right, I have a question about it: in this sentence, is "clean" an adverb or an adjective? I think that "I cleanly ...
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2answers
87 views

Is there a ly word describing 5 times a week? [closed]

I need a ly word for five times a week. Is there even such a word?
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2answers
30 views

An adjective that says “which are very scarce to begin with”

I am looking for an adjective that says "which are very few to begin with" to fill the blank in the following sentence. When I was writing a story on __ female astronomers at Pitt for our school ...
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0answers
17 views

At this time should I use plural or singular verb? [migrated]

Is the following sentence correct? "Each of our products are guaranteed" I'm assuming it's correct since the phrase "each of them" is plural
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8answers
15k views

What's a good word for a lack of concentration?

I'm looking for an adjective that describes not concentrated. Something like "flying around", "not really here". In hebrew it would've been מעופף.
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1answer
365 views

Adjective form of the verb despise?

Saw the title of the movie where minions come out - "Despicable Me" - I was curious, as despicable has the suffix -able, what would be its verb form? Then, I thought, is it de-spice? Which made me ...
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1answer
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“You are spoilt” or “You are spoiled”

When helping my son with the homework in (non-native) English, I got stuck by sentence. What is correct: "You are spoilt!" or "You are spoiled!" or both alternatives? If it matters, this part ...