Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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A word meaning someone who can speak well to influence people

I am looking for an adjective/noun for someone who is able to speak/ makes speeches very well and uses words effectively to influence/impress people.
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6answers
5k views

How long can you say “the late so and so”?

When you refer to the deceased, you say "the late so and so." How long can you say that? Is JFK referred to as the late John F. Kennedy? How about Abraham Lincoln?
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2answers
63 views

“Delinquent” to describe something non-monetary

Can delinquent be used to describe something like a school assignment? You still have some delinquent assignments. Or does the word only apply to monetary matters?
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2answers
518 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
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2answers
505 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
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2answers
125 views

Is it grammatically incorrect to say that someone desires ambiguous brevity?

Brevity is a noun, is it not? So, ambiguous, being an adjective, should be able to modify it, correct? That was the first thought I had regarding the subject, but for some reason it just doesn't sound ...
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1answer
129 views

“Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?

I'm writing a sentence about the job of the memory and am characterizing absorption with memory. How do I say "memorical absorption" correctly? Memorial sounds like a noun...
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2answers
7k views

Which is correct - “most quiet” or “quietest”?

A friend of mine saw a gun at the store that was labeled as the "most quiet gun". Is this correct English or is it more correct to say, the "quietest gun"?
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2answers
500 views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
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1answer
104 views

“Hierarchical” vs. “hierarchic”

When do you use hierarchical and when hierarchic? For example, hierarchical database sounds much more native to me, even as a non-native English speaker. But why isn't it hierarchic database? Edit: ...
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2answers
2k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
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3answers
4k views

Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more ...
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2answers
131 views

Meaning of “dogmatic” in “there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood”

and whenever she heard a large word she said it over to herself many times, and so was able to keep it until there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood, then she would get it off, and ...
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1answer
74 views

Usage of “extensive participation”

What exactly does 'extensive participation' mean? Can I use this phrase in a sentence like this: Due to her extensive participation she hardly got time for her studies.
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2answers
771 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
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0answers
22 views

How should I interpret the word “read” when it is in parentheses? [duplicate]

I understand that in the following sentence, "read" in brackets is meant to indicate that the adjective outside the brackets should be replaced with the adjective within the brackets: His approach ...
3
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4answers
268 views

Word meaning academic or rational, when describing the style of an argument

Here's the context: Dude's an awful troll. If he wants to express his views, he should present them in a more [adjective] manner. What we're getting at here is that the guy sounds obnoxious, ...
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4answers
3k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
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1answer
105 views

Should one use the term “adjective agreement” or “adjectival agreement”?

Is it better to use the term adjective agreement (noun noun) or adjectival agreement (adjective noun)? By contrast, when talking of subject-verb agreement, I'm not aware of an adjectival term like ...
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2answers
225 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...
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3answers
69 views

How would you group the terms “Single” and “Pair”?

I am working on a website at the moment and I am trying to perfect the User Experience. The products on the store are either sold on their own, or as pairs. What I want is a word or phrase to put in ...
2
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1answer
402 views

Can “some” be a noun and a subject?

What is the noun in this sentence: Some of our greatest innovations were launched during tough times. I know that of our greatest innovations is a prepositional phrase and as such cannot contain ...
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4answers
110 views

What's a good way to describe “everything”, when that “everything” is very little?

I thought about describing it this way: ...which led to his loss of the little of everything he had. It doesn't sound very nice, and it also sounds like I'm saying that the loss was a "little of ...
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3answers
1k views

How would you call a word that doesn't exist or translate well into another language?

I've run into this situation several times, being a native Spanish speaker. There are some words you just can't translate into another language. Is there a particular word to describe this? I'm not ...
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1answer
57 views

antiquarian (adjective) misuse re: dictionary definition

multiple choice ... "antiquarian book" refers to: 1. an antique book about anything 2. any age book about old books 3. a book about people who deal in old books 4. a book in the antiquar language or ...
6
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2answers
427 views

Is “woman” really interchangable with “female” as an adjective?

I listen to BBC Radio 4 a fair bit. They pretty much always use "woman" as opposed to "female" - like "a woman pilot". To me this just sounds completely wrong, and most stuff I can find online about ...
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1answer
255 views

Sentence fragments as modifiers: “self-sacrifice incarnate, the 10th Doctor wavered…”?

I was recently asked to choose which of following two excerpts sounded better: Emotionally vulnerable and incarnate of self-sacrifice, the Tenth Doctor wavered between romantic and intensely ...
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2answers
155 views

Can you use “Goldilocks” as an adjective?

Space professionals have popularized the terms Goldilocks planet & Goldilocks zone to describe planets and regions of space around a star that, like earth, are "just right" to conceivably harbor ...
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2answers
183 views

What would you call someone who is there if you need him but who is not imposing?

I am sitting in a restaurant and the waiter is available for me if I call him. He is there but not imposing. In a high end restaurant, the waiter would be serving while maintaining the quietness and ...
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2answers
45 views

“Two separate nouns + based” as the attribute?

In scientific writing, it is correct to write something like The filter-based method is good. But what if I have two nouns before -based? Something like The lowpass filter-based method is ...
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2answers
3k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
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6answers
7k views

“Bald Faced Lie” vs. “Bold Faced Lie”

Which of these is correct? What is the origin of this expression? I've searched here on the exchange and haven't found an answer.
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0answers
44 views

Adverb for “friendly” [duplicate]

Some adjectives already end in -ly, e.g. friendly, lovely, silly, lonely. How do I form the corresponding adverb? For example: Sara is a friendly girl. She talks to me [adverb corresponding to ...
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1answer
115 views

Adjective meaning “with good visibility?”

Example: There was a bright moon in the sky. If it weren't for the fog, the streets would have looked incredibly [...]. I can't think of the right adjetive (aside of clear). Any other ...
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2answers
56 views

Whose conclusion vs concluding

I'm attempting to state the conclusion authors drew from a study. At first, I had written my sentence like this: Reardon, Arshan, and Attebery detail a study in which Texas teachers selectively ...
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2answers
717 views

What is the difference between “exhausted” and “enervated”?

What is the difference between exhausted and enervated when used to refer to human beings?
2
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1answer
376 views

The use of nearly-similar words

I have heard people using two words that are nearly similar or with a subtle difference. The examples include 'each and every' & 'until and unless'. Is it correct to use these words in English? ...
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2answers
51 views

Is “homogeneous…as” grammatically correct?

Here is the sentence: "A is made of a homogeneous material as that of B" Is this sentence grammatically correct?? or is there any more appopriate phrase?? Please help me out..
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2answers
133 views

Single word for logical but obstructive responses

Consider the following situation. A prosecutor in court is asking questions of an expert witness. The responses are all negative with the expert always adding another explanation to the prosecutor's ...
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2answers
93 views

A word for “nobody depends on me”

If I do not depend on anybody, I can say: I am independent And if nobody depends on me. Is there a monoword to describe that?
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2answers
241 views

“The distance is great” vs. “high” vs. “large”

I don't want to change the structure of the sentence. So please tell me which adjective works better in this sentence — great, high or large. Due to the resolution of cameras, vehicles are not ...
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2answers
57 views

sarcastic vs sarcastically [closed]

Where is the difference between these two forms? His message was meant sarcastic. His message was meant sarcastically.
2
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3answers
1k views

Difference between “original” and “genuine” [closed]

I often buy something in an online shop. I noticed some descriptions say an item is original or genuine. What is the difference? For example, say there's an Apple USB cable, and another, fake Apple ...
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3answers
281 views

To talk angrily and provoked in a low voice

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person continuously talking angrily as if fighting with someone, for example over a phone, but in a low and whispering manner.
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4answers
131 views

Growing abruptly and aggressively - words

How to describe a sudden increasing in size, volume. For example when fires grow suddenly and rapidly. What does that fire do?
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4answers
185 views

Word for “getting careless and slacking”

Can you suggest some words which can describe a person who is starting to get careless and who slacks, or the very action of becoming careless? A person who was efficiently and elaborately doing their ...
4
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3answers
589 views

Why is “biblical” the only proper adjective to not use upper case?

Generally, when an adjective is derived from a proper noun, the adjective also has a capital initial, hence Googleable, Mancunian, British, and Shavian. (In contrast, verbs are not given capitals, ...
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2answers
1k views

What's the difference between “ex-” and “former” [closed]

Is there any real difference in usage between ex- and former?
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4answers
2k views

Word for a person who lives in the past

Someone who is highly nostalgic and is stuck in the past, better days
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3answers
179 views

The state of not progressing [closed]

What is the state of not progressing called? Going in circles. When the person is not progressing despite the active trying.