Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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2
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3answers
120 views

A word that refers to something that had lasted most of one's life?

She wants to get rid of an affliction that had been haunting her most of her life. I was thinking if I could make the passage above shorter, say using an adjective instead of that had been ...
3
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1answer
125 views

It was established on a rocky foundation [closed]

It was established on a rocky foundation. Does it mean steady or shaky?
2
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3answers
283 views

“My latest five novels” or “my five latest novels”?

Is it okay to say "my latest five novels" when I want to express "five of my latest novels"? As far as I know, "five" is a postdeterminer, so it precedes an adjective (except for ...
3
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2answers
218 views

What's the logic behind adjectives constructed with a hyphen?

I'll give you a lovecraftian stanza: Thro’ the ghoul-guarded gateways of slumber, Past the wan-moon’d abysses of night, I have liv’d o’er my lives without number, I have sounded all things ...
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1answer
79 views

“Chinese” or “China”?

I read an American magazine that usually contains three or four articles each week about the business climate in China. This week, however, the magazine did not have any Chinese news. This week, ...
4
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4answers
324 views

Can we use two pronouns side by side?

While writing an essay, I felt the need to write two "her"s simultaneously: Jane had taken the book from Ann five months ago, and hence felt the need to return her her book as soon as possible. ...
0
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2answers
137 views

Word describing a pre-ordered order status?

I'm looking for the most concise order status descriptor for an order where the customer is still selecting items (for example, they've put stuff in the bag, but they haven't checked out). Other ...
0
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3answers
3k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water”

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
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3answers
601 views

“Strange as it may sound” vs “Strange sound though it may be” [closed]

I'm trying to write something and this question popped up. Which would be more correct? "Strange as it may sound ~" or "Strange sound though it may be ~" Thanks.
10
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1answer
278 views

“not as” versus “less”

English speakers seem to prefer "less powerful" over "not as powerful", and "not as big" over "less big". There's at least a ten-to-one ratio in both cases—See this Google Ngram. There also seems to ...
6
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6answers
360 views

X’s language is so rich and . . .? [closed]

I’m looking for a word to describe the language of a writer which has the characteristic of being rich and at the same time says that the words that this writer uses have many layers of meanings. ...
4
votes
1answer
398 views

Is there a word like “ambidextrous” to describe mixed hemisphere brain dominance?

In brain dominance theory, the terms left-/right-brained, left-/right-minded, and left/right hemisphere dominant are often used to describe a particular lateral dominance within the human brain. Many ...
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1answer
123 views

Adjective relating to Great Britain and Ireland

Is there an adjective meaning “from or pertaining to the British Isles” (or if you prefer “from Great Britain, Ireland or surrounding islands”, or “from the Atlantic Archipelago”, or whatever floats ...
3
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0answers
63 views

Words that are members of multiple classes of words (without changing form) [duplicate]

By "class of word" I mean a noun, verb, adjective, adverb etc. This notation came from reading the definitions of these words themselves. For example noun grammar any member of a class of words ...
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3answers
639 views

What's the difference between “erroneous” and “wrong”? [closed]

Are these words totally interchangeable? I made the [erroneous/wrong] decision.
5
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5answers
843 views

What is more appropriate to say “pay especial attention to” or “pay special attention to”

Merriam Webster Special 1 : distinguished by some unusual quality especially : being in some way superior 2 : held in particular esteem 3 a : readily distinguishable from others of ...
1
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3answers
758 views

Noun-adjective-noun: Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle?

Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle as in the following examples? car new tires salad high-calorie dressing house external wall nitrogen fine droplets These examples ...
3
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1answer
261 views

“Is” or “are” with two nouns and one of them being modified by an adjective?

I was surfing the internet the other day when I found this phrase: Instead your precious time and attention is wasted. To my ears, it sounds wrong. But I'm not a native English speaker, so I consulted ...
0
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3answers
621 views

Word meaning “close in time, or presently happening”

Is there a word that can be used to describe something that is either close in time, or currently happening? Something like "proximate" or "imminent", but without the implication that the thing has ...
0
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1answer
172 views

?thesaurical, adj

The adjectival form of thesaurus does not seem to have been listed on (all) standard dictionaries. However, thesaurical occurs in literature1 and is also defined in Urban Dictionary. Do we have an ...
2
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1answer
166 views

Visual connotation associated with “lucid”

I’m interested in the definition and connotation of lucid when it comes to physical objects: what does a lucid object look like? From Merriam-Webster: suffused with light : luminous ...
3
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1answer
133 views

What's a good adjective to whether a set/range can be “tessellated”

Say I have the concept of a "Range", which is basically an "Interval" in Mathematics. If a range is inclusive ("closed") on one end and exclusive on the other, it has the following property: It ...
12
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6answers
2k views

Opposite word for “cursive”, as related to writing

I looked up the etymology entry at etymonline.com for cursive, which reads: 1784, from French cursif (18c.), from Medieval Latin cursivus “running,” from Latin cursus “a running,” from past ...
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5answers
724 views

what is the adjectival form of the word “noun?”

What is the adjectival form of the word 'noun'? Every result I get is for the adjectival form of a noun, not the word 'noun' itself.
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2answers
849 views

One word for “seemingly small but very important” [closed]

I need one word (if there is any) for "seemingly small but very important".
3
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5answers
335 views

Similar numbers [closed]

Say, I have two numbers which are almost equal: A = 1.000000000000000000000001 and B = 1.000000000000000000000002 What is the right way to say that they are "almost the same"? A is almost ...
4
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2answers
227 views

Awkwardness around 'go live' phrase [closed]

Context: software company training documents. We commonly use the phrase "go live" when talking about making a system operational. I'm fine with using it as two separate words, but it becomes awkward ...
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2answers
254 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
7
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4answers
216 views

How can I disambiguate “shorter”?

Consider the following two boxes with the provided dimensions: A: 10 inches long 10 inches wide 10 inches tall B: 11 inches long 12 inches wide 13 inches tall I wish to communicate the side ...
19
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6answers
2k views

Can “wet” be used for liquids other than water?

Wet can be used to describe being dowsed in liquids such as beer, milk, juice, urine etc. All of these, however, are water-based. Can wet be used for a liquid that has no water? Can you be wet by ...
2
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4answers
164 views

What does ‘tame’ mean in ‘tame scandal’ and ‘tame squabble’ on golf course?

In association with my question about the names of foods that have a risk of turning into an offensive remark, there was the following statement in New Yorker’s (May 25) article titled “Sergio Garcia ...
12
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1answer
1k views

What is the difference in usage between “lethal” and “fatal”?

This cropped up when I was in a conversation with a friend. I guess fatal must talk of something which has necessarily resulted in death, while lethality is more about potential to cause death. Yet I ...
2
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2answers
803 views

“The later part of the 20th century” vs. “the latter part of the 20th century”

For the sentence fragment: "...during the later part of the 20th century" using "latter" sounds better to me: "...during the latter part of the 20th century" But most websites I find have ...
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0answers
38 views

Is there a rule that dictates the usage of the ending of adjectives as in: symbolical vs. symbolic; economic vs. economical; mythic vs. mythical? [duplicate]

I'm not a native English speaker, but I do have to write in English quite a lot in my work, and I've often come across the use of adjectives that are sometimes added the "al" suffix, as with the ...
5
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1answer
837 views

“more” is to “less” as “er” is to what?

Excerpt from Cambridge Dictionary of American English: If you want to use an adjective or adverb to say that a quality is of a higher degree, you can usually add -er (one-syllable adjectives) to ...
3
votes
2answers
240 views

Is there a word to describe the organisation of cells?

For example whether an organism is unicellular or multicellular would be its _. There is a word 'cellularity', though I don't think that is quite the word I am looking for.
1
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2answers
74 views

Is it correct to say: too homogeneous?

This is the context: "I missed the diversity of church, it felt rather like a French-only church, or an under-21’s church may feel like—too homogeneous." I want to use the word homogeneousitic, but I ...
3
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1answer
2k views

What are the comparative and superlative forms of 'lively'?

My teacher taught me that to form the comparative and superlative degrees of a mono- or di- or tri-syllabic word, I should add 'more' and 'most', e.g.: lively -more lively-most lively I know ...
2
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3answers
176 views

Adjective + “of them”

My wife and I were discussing whether it is allowable to put an adjective in front of "of them". For instance, I could say "I want 5 cats" and "I want 5 of them". However, while it sounds perfectly ...
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5answers
1k views

The word to know when you don't know how to feel?

What is the word to use when you don't know how to feel? Such as instead of 'he didn't know how to feel' 'he felt __'.
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4answers
119 views

Is “a future musician” grammatical?

I want to become a musician in the future. Is it correct to say I am a future musician. I want to put it in my bio for Twitter. Are there any other better phrases?
3
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6answers
273 views

A pejorative term for “unreasonably gregarious”

I am looking for a pejorative term to describe someone who constantly needs social interaction regardless of quality. Something along the lines of "social nymphomaniac", but not necessarily ...
1
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1answer
1k views

When to use “huge” and “big” [closed]

What is the difference between huge and big? For example: He made a huge difference to the team. He made a big difference to the team. Is there a difference in meaning?
1
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2answers
574 views

Is a sentence beginning with “Different from” not so good?

I saw one topic on the wordreference forum discussing whether a sentence could begin with "Different from" (see the post). The example sentences in that post are A: Different from Drug A, Drug B ...
4
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0answers
180 views

Etymology Moderne of … “sick”, “bad”, and words we hardly consider being the opposite any more [closed]

Somewhat prosaically, it was stated that the origin (or at least the coining practice likely used) of the word "sick" to mean "awesome", or "cool", or "astounding" ... itself used the word "cool", ...
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1answer
1k views

Proper adjective to use with the word “chance” (“low”, “small”, “slim”, etc.)

What is the proper adjective to use with the word chance? Can chance be low, small, slim? What would be your suggestion?
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2answers
547 views

“It was still bright/light outside.” Is one of these incorrect?

If I want to say it's still somewhat early in the evening and it's not so dark outside so that you can still see things quite clearly almost like during daytime, which of the following sentences would ...
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4answers
386 views

Is “emptiest” a logically correct term?

There are some adjectives that are logical binaries, e.g. empty — either the noun is empty or it isn't. Can we apply a superlative degree to such adjectives? E.g. This is the emptiest these ...
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1answer
74 views

Migratory or migration?

In this phrase: the migratory activity of white blood cells is it possible to replaced the adjective migratory by the noun migration, which also serves as an adjective? Only one variant is ...
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4answers
203 views

The ( changed ) meaning or classification of words in programming [closed]

I am facing a bit of a dilemma / problem. I am an amateur programmer ( profile ) , and in programming languages some terms are accepted, known to everyone and frequently used everywhere. My ...