Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
4answers
790 views

Word for doing something only because it provokes a reaction from others [duplicate]

Some people act in ways that provoke surprised or shocked reactions from others, mainly because they enjoy getting those reactions and not because of any inherent desire to perform the action itself. ...
3
votes
2answers
941 views

“High aspirations” vs. “large aspirations”

When you intend to say someone has a strong desire to achieve something high or great, is it proper to say they have "high aspirations"? Or would it be "large aspirations", or something else?
63
votes
17answers
12k views

Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?

If light can pass through an object, or if you can see through it, it is transparent. Is there a similar word for "air can pass through", or you can breathe through an object? This adjective would be ...
9
votes
9answers
737 views

What words mean “not located yet”?

I am doing a persuasive essay for English. I want a word that means "not located yet", as in if you know something exists, but have not yet found the boundaries where it exists. As in genetics, where ...
2
votes
2answers
336 views

Omission of verbs

This following sentence is puzzling me. Neither can I understand the meaning, nor can I reason the grammatical soundness of the sentence. Some symbols acquire a multitude of meanings, some widely ...
-1
votes
2answers
92 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
2
votes
2answers
201 views

What is an adjective for “almost, but not entirely correct”?

I'm looking for an adjective, and I'll use an example to describe what I'm looking for. John says: "It is impossible to stand on one hand." When in reality, it is unimaginably difficult (one might ...
0
votes
3answers
11k views

“As evidenced by” or “as evident by”?

I have this sentence: Group theory is one of my favourite areas in mathematics, as evidenced by the fact that I chose to do two group theory modules in my undergraduate course. I am wondering if ...
0
votes
1answer
144 views

Referring to a person, should I use the capital letter for “Fascist”?

As I understand, the word Fascism must be capitalised, while the adjective fascist should not. But what if "Fascist" is used as a noun? Eg: "The headmaster was enlisted in the National Fascist Party ...
-2
votes
1answer
133 views

Is “fine” one of the strangest words in English language? How did it come to be this way and are there other examples? [closed]

Many words have multiple meanings but not many words have different meanings in the same context. Fine can mean both very good-to-excellent and acceptable but probably below average. For example, the ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
1
vote
2answers
67 views

Looking for the inverse of “frictional”

Does frictional means "that which is produced by friction"? Or is there a better word that means "that which generates friction"?
1
vote
2answers
186 views

Why does “forgetive” mean “creative”, not “easy to forget things”?

As the title says. It surprised me when I found this online dictionary entry at the time I tried to express "easy to forget things" and "forgetive" appeared in my mind. What is the history or ...
0
votes
2answers
215 views

A word meaning 'to throw things out too quickly'

It would be [adjective] to dismiss president's new policy, as purely politic playing, it appears he has genuine intentions to improve the well being of the poor. What adjective would be correct to ...
1
vote
3answers
616 views

Can you begin a sentence with an emotion?

Is it incorrect to begin a sentence with an emotion? For example: "Afraid and alone, he no longer wished to continue on." I'm translating some work from a foreign language into English, but I ...
4
votes
3answers
14k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
1
vote
2answers
118 views

Word for an entity, specifically a city, which is of the same nationality as you?

Is there a word to describe a city (or any entity) that is part of the same country or state, similar to the meaning of compatriot, but as an adjective. "Allied" is close, but it is too distant as it ...
1
vote
1answer
501 views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
1
vote
5answers
1k views

A single word for “not seeing the big picture”

I am looking for a word that would describe being obsessed with the details of a larger entity such that the "looker" neglects to see the whole or (perhaps more importantly) the purpose of the whole. ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

What is the difference between 'The Germany National team' and 'the German national team'? [duplicate]

I can't say I get it. I think the difference is: 'The Germany National team' is team which represents Germany as a country. And it is its formal title. 'the German national team' is team which ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Why is there “Germany National Team”, not “German National Team”?

Why is the team from Germany called "Germany National Team", not "German National Team"? On official Internet sites, it is the same for every official national team; Germany National, France National, ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Opened vs open?

Is there are rule when to use opened vs open? I always get confused even though I've been speaking English as the dominant language for more than half my life. E.g. Is the door open(ed)? ...
6
votes
7answers
8k views

A word meaning someone who can speak well to influence people

I am looking for an adjective/noun for someone who is able to speak/ makes speeches very well and uses words effectively to influence/impress people.
41
votes
6answers
5k views

How long can you say “the late so and so”?

When you refer to the deceased, you say "the late so and so." How long can you say that? Is JFK referred to as the late John F. Kennedy? How about Abraham Lincoln?
0
votes
2answers
64 views

“Delinquent” to describe something non-monetary

Can delinquent be used to describe something like a school assignment? You still have some delinquent assignments. Or does the word only apply to monetary matters?
4
votes
2answers
559 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
1
vote
2answers
536 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
1
vote
2answers
127 views

Is it grammatically incorrect to say that someone desires ambiguous brevity?

Brevity is a noun, is it not? So, ambiguous, being an adjective, should be able to modify it, correct? That was the first thought I had regarding the subject, but for some reason it just doesn't sound ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

“Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?

I'm writing a sentence about the job of the memory and am characterizing absorption with memory. How do I say "memorical absorption" correctly? Memorial sounds like a noun...
0
votes
2answers
8k views

Which is correct - “most quiet” or “quietest”?

A friend of mine saw a gun at the store that was labeled as the "most quiet gun". Is this correct English or is it more correct to say, the "quietest gun"?
4
votes
2answers
571 views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

“Hierarchical” vs. “hierarchic”

When do you use hierarchical and when hierarchic? For example, hierarchical database sounds much more native to me, even as a non-native English speaker. But why isn't it hierarchic database? Edit: ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
3
votes
3answers
5k views

Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more ...
2
votes
2answers
134 views

Meaning of “dogmatic” in “there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood”

and whenever she heard a large word she said it over to herself many times, and so was able to keep it until there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood, then she would get it off, and ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Usage of “extensive participation”

What exactly does 'extensive participation' mean? Can I use this phrase in a sentence like this: Due to her extensive participation she hardly got time for her studies.
1
vote
2answers
837 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How should I interpret the word “read” when it is in parentheses? [duplicate]

I understand that in the following sentence, "read" in brackets is meant to indicate that the adjective outside the brackets should be replaced with the adjective within the brackets: His approach ...
3
votes
4answers
282 views

Word meaning academic or rational, when describing the style of an argument

Here's the context: Dude's an awful troll. If he wants to express his views, he should present them in a more [adjective] manner. What we're getting at here is that the guy sounds obnoxious, ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Should one use the term “adjective agreement” or “adjectival agreement”?

Is it better to use the term adjective agreement (noun noun) or adjectival agreement (adjective noun)? By contrast, when talking of subject-verb agreement, I'm not aware of an adjectival term like ...
1
vote
2answers
230 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

How would you group the terms “Single” and “Pair”?

I am working on a website at the moment and I am trying to perfect the User Experience. The products on the store are either sold on their own, or as pairs. What I want is a word or phrase to put in ...
2
votes
1answer
457 views

Can “some” be a noun and a subject?

What is the noun in this sentence: Some of our greatest innovations were launched during tough times. I know that of our greatest innovations is a prepositional phrase and as such cannot contain ...
0
votes
4answers
113 views

What's a good way to describe “everything”, when that “everything” is very little?

I thought about describing it this way: ...which led to his loss of the little of everything he had. It doesn't sound very nice, and it also sounds like I'm saying that the loss was a "little of ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

How would you call a word that doesn't exist or translate well into another language?

I've run into this situation several times, being a native Spanish speaker. There are some words you just can't translate into another language. Is there a particular word to describe this? I'm not ...
-2
votes
1answer
58 views

antiquarian (adjective) misuse re: dictionary definition

multiple choice ... "antiquarian book" refers to: 1. an antique book about anything 2. any age book about old books 3. a book about people who deal in old books 4. a book in the antiquar language or ...
6
votes
2answers
449 views

Is “woman” really interchangable with “female” as an adjective?

I listen to BBC Radio 4 a fair bit. They pretty much always use "woman" as opposed to "female" - like "a woman pilot". To me this just sounds completely wrong, and most stuff I can find online about ...
3
votes
1answer
274 views

Sentence fragments as modifiers: “self-sacrifice incarnate, the 10th Doctor wavered…”?

I was recently asked to choose which of following two excerpts sounded better: Emotionally vulnerable and incarnate of self-sacrifice, the Tenth Doctor wavered between romantic and intensely ...
2
votes
2answers
162 views

Can you use “Goldilocks” as an adjective?

Space professionals have popularized the terms Goldilocks planet & Goldilocks zone to describe planets and regions of space around a star that, like earth, are "just right" to conceivably harbor ...