Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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What is the etymology of the word “basic” as used in current slang? [duplicate]

For those not familiar with the term, it is used mainly by teens and 20-somethings. The definition can be found at Urban Dictionary (look at definitions 1 and 3). Specifically, I am not talking ...
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1answer
75 views

Innovative vs Innovatory

I came accross the word innovatory today. Few terrorist tactics or targets are ever entirely original, but a combination of different elements can often be innovatory. [The Guardian] I checked ...
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“large field of view” vs “high field of view”

Which one is right between "large field of view" and "high field of view"?
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160 views

What adjective would you choose if you want to elevate a workaholic to a higher degree?

I want to refer a hard-working person something far more than referring him a mere "workaholic". What adjective should I choose with "workaholic", if I want to refer him as someone working even harder ...
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1answer
57 views

adjective-noun-adjective-noun

What is the correct punctuation of something like "constant factor competitive algorithm"? This is a term that frequently appears in computer science articles, and I have seen it written in multiple ...
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1answer
25 views

Business English: contracted forum?

I would like to know your opinions regarding the use of the term "contracted forum". The context is a long-term project for which steering committee meetings are being conducted. At one time, the ...
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1answer
73 views

The adjective “close” in a competitive situation

Oxford defines "close" thus: Adj (With reference to a competitive situation) won or likely to be won by only a small amount or distance: "the race will be a close contest" "she finished ...
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1answer
62 views

Which preposition to use with “unbecoming”?

It is easy when you say something becomes or unbecomes someone. In this case, no preposition is needed. It is another story when the verb turns into the adjective “(un)becoming”. I would like to ...
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How come we say “data set” instead of “datum set”?

Given that "data" is the plural form, and it's playing the role of an adjective here, how come we don't use the singular form? Other kinds of sets, for example "point set", "skill set", "stationery ...
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Why “No smoking” works but “Yes smoking” doesn't?

No smoking is a formula used to indicate smoking is not allowed. Why can't we use Yes smoking to indicate smoking is allowed? (Although, we might use humorously but I've never heard actually.) ...
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3answers
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What is a word for a mad or insane explanation? Something offered as an explanation that makes no sense at all? [closed]

I am looking for a word that designates something as crazy but does not imply a judgment.
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4answers
187 views

Word which means that a number has magnitude greater than one?

I am looking for a word which describes a number as having a magnitude greater than one. i.e. numbers such as 1.2, 100, 123456, -4, -1.01 Hopefully it should be usable in a sentence like this one: ...
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25 views

Should less be repeated to clarify it applies to a series?

For a sentence like this: That setting results in a less firm and stable surface. Is it clear that less applies to both firm and stable or should it be repeated to avoid ambiguity between the ...
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1answer
170 views

When may adjectives precede determiners? (E.g. too difficult a task)

The expression too difficult a task sounds a little pompous, but it doesn't sound ungrammatical. According to my folk-beliefs about English grammar, determiners precede adjectives. However, the ...
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0answers
88 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
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1answer
56 views

Organizational term meaning “order appearing in a book” as contrasted to chronological

Is there a word that means "in the order something appears in a book or document" as opposed to chronological meaning "the order something occurs in time." Ignoring the fact that my examples may not ...
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3answers
148 views

A word to mean escape from a dire situation involving death

When the Sobibór prisoners escaped they were in a dire situation. They could stay in the camp to face certain execution, or revolt. Risking revolt meant they might die, but there would be a slim ...
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1answer
64 views

What is the adjective for something that evokes claustrophobia?

Something that really bothers me is when people say something like "This place is really claustrophobic", when of course it is them who is claustrophobic, not the place. However, it bothers me more ...
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1answer
149 views

Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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6answers
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Two-word adjective to describe a university life that has just started?

For objects you can say things like a brand-new car. For beliefs you can write a new-born Christian. What about periods in life like university life? Example: Emma has every reason to be happy. ...
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Irregular adjectives

Are there any other irregular adjectives except these ?
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1answer
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Word that describes a clown who weakens an argument by taking a side

When there is more than one side in a debate, an argument can be weakened by someone who is seen as stupid or a joker if they are vocal about it. This invalidates your beliefs because if crazy person ...
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3answers
106 views

An adjective to describe someone who has a “good personality”? [closed]

I can't think of a word to describe someone with a good personality and who you can't think of a bad word to say about them. Samuel is such a ______ guy. You never hear a bad word said against him....
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3answers
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Adjective that means “found in groups” but without implying a social behavior?

For example, jellyfish are usually found in groups. However, they are not "social animals", they just end up together because of the current of the sea (or other physical phenomena). What's an ...
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4answers
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A word whose meaning is very close to dangerous

I am looking for an adjective to write "Anger is a ____ feeling" instead of "Anger can have dangerous consequences". Could you please help out?
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2answers
338 views

Difference between 'melancholic' and adjective 'melancholy'?

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives melancholy and melancholic? Can they be used interchangeably? The Oxford Learner's Dictionaries define them as follows: melancholy (...
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1answer
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Can a person be “overly literal”

It's common to say someone is being overly literal if their interpretation of a phrase is too strictly literal either intentionally (nitpickers) or unintentionally (people learning another language). ...
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2answers
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What is the correct adjective suffix form for tropism?

A tropism is a type of biological response where an organism reacts to a particular environmental stimulus. For instance, try searching for gravitropism or phototropism and you'll see what I mean. I'...
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5answers
768 views

What is a noun for “one who is responsible”?

The word "responsible" works as an adjective only. What is a noun for a person who bears some responsibility (i.e. is accountable for something)? Note: Originally my question was longer, but the ...
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1answer
527 views

A word that describes someone who 'sees/brings out the good in others'?

The person doesn't have to be good themselves, but they can bring the good out of others. The word doesn't have to be an english word, I just want to know if such a word exists. Ex. Beauty with the ...
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15answers
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Adjective for someone who doesn't react when someone insults them? [closed]

What's a good adjective to describe someone who doesn't react when someone does something immature or insults them?
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1answer
51 views

A word that implies 'unique' (on an object or act)

First time posting here, no idea if this is the right sort of question but I'll give the full background and let you decide. I play a game called DotA, in which there are items which modify the way ...
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3answers
114 views

“Potential,” “wanna-be”: what's an equivalent for “should-be”?

If "Ooze News could be a title for my website about slime molds," I can say: Ooze News is a potential title for my website about slime molds. If "Janet wants to be a pilot," I can say: Janet ...
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2answers
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What is a better alternative to the word rickety?

My sentence is "The system was so badly designed that it has now become rickety. Even a minor change could cause the entire system to collapse". Rickety just doesn't seem to fit well.
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It was too tempting a chance to resist

One day, I came across this sentence: This chance was too tempting a chance to resist. Even though this sounded perfectly natural to me, as I tried to get the full meaning out of it, I ...
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2answers
244 views

what do you call a person who is good at making improvements on the way things are done?

I'm thinking of a skill or a characteristic trait that is descriptive of someone who is always asking him/herself: "How can this be done more effectively?"
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2answers
247 views

Why adjective can be placed after “eat” as in “garlic can be eaten raw”?

Edit note: This question with some good answers does not explain (or ask) why it is an adjective that's used as opposed to an adverb in this type of construction: Is this an objective complement or ...
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1answer
532 views

Strong vs strongly

''We started strong...'' ''We started strongly...'' Which one is correct? I thought that ''started'' required an adverb, but I've recently heard someone say ''strong'' and now I have this conundrum.
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5answers
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Descriptive word for someone who sees the world in black and white

Trying to think of a characteristic trait for someone that sees the world in black and white...almost like decisive / moralistic / ethical but not quite. Things are black and white, there's no gray ...
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1answer
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Can I use the word “Applicator” to describe a person in the following context?

Here's the context in question, please read on: "The final proof is in the listening and John knows this. This knowledge makes him a designer in constant dynamic relationship with what he makes, ...
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1answer
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Use of “due to” after modal verbs [duplicate]

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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1answer
334 views

A way to describe the sound a car makes when you're cranking it over, but it won't start?

What words or phrases can be used to describe a car unsuccessfully starting, i.e. a car that won't start when the key is turned in the ignition. I am writing a satire on the dependence which people ...
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2answers
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Is there an adjective for the word “dictionary”?

Is there an adjective for the word "dictionary"? For example, the adjective for "book" is "bibliographical"; and "literature", "literary". A bibliophile may give you a literary definition; a ...
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3answers
384 views

To infinitive used after adjective

This question is relatively simple. I don't understand why we never use passive form of to infinitive after the adjective unless the subject is "it". For example: He is difficult to please. ...
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2answers
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Is this term correct? [closed]

I wonder if this sentence "I m the most recent fan here" is correct? I mean if the word "recent" can describe a person?
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2answers
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Quarter Asteroidal Hypocycloid, in Layman's Terms

Take a gander at the hypocycloid. You may recognize the shape from the logo of an American football team... My question is, how do you describe the tip of one such shape in common parlance (in ...
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0answers
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use of “due to” or “becasue of” with modal verbs

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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1answer
222 views

Helping-adverbs vs. Helping-adjectives vs. Adverbs of degree

I've recently come across the terms helping-adverb and helping-adjective in some old grammar books. From the book A practical grammar of the English language (by Roscoe Goddard Greene, 1830): A ...
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What is the adjectival form of “place”? [closed]

Space is to spatial as place is to what adjective?
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“Hair” to is “hairy” as “key” is to what word? [closed]

There is a noun hair, so person who has a lot of hair is hairy. So how about key; is there any word that means that person has keys. In programming terms, a container has keys for every value, like in ...