Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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599 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
2
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6answers
740 views

A word which means “military-like” or “authoritative looking”

I ran into a word recently that I never knew existed and now it is killing me that I forgot what it was. It was a word that described what someone is wearing that looks like it is military, or of ...
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1answer
264 views

Usage of “other” with singular nouns

Reading an English textbook and learning stuff, they mention that that "other" is used only with plural or uncountable nouns. But what about this? There is no other way..no other option. Car ends ...
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12answers
458 views

What is a good word to describe unchanging?

I want to say something like. This department is getting [Insert Adjective to describe old and unchanging]. I thought of decrepit but not sure if this will really communicate my point
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1answer
124 views

Is 'somelike' a word?

Never mind the laconic title. It's incontrovertibly a word. What I'd like to know is whether the little bugger has ever been recorded by lexicographers. I've ruffled a dozen dictionaries to no avail, ...
4
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3answers
301 views

What do you call someone who always talks a situation in their favor?

What do you call someone who always talks a situation in their favor? For example, Tom tells Mary that she has a piece of meat stuck in between her teeth. Mary replies "Oh I purposely left it there". ...
2
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4answers
77 views

Word to express a building's potential to be guarded against a forced exit

I am looking for a word that expresses the idea of a prison being difficult to escape because of its physical construction, in a similar way that 'fortified' means a structure is difficult to attack ...
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2answers
180 views

What adjective can describe someone who counts his chickens before they're hatched?

For example, someone who writes "I chose to study biology and chemistry at school because I am going to become a doctor after graduating."
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3answers
442 views

Multivariant or Multivariate?

When testing performance or the output of different combinations of elements against one another - is it correct to say it's a "multivariant" test? Or is it a "multivariate" test?
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2answers
170 views

What does “buggy” mean in “a hot, buggy August morning”?

While reading a short story, I came across a use of the word "buggy" that I'm not familiar with: It’s a hot, buggy August morning, too early for lunch, so we find a deserted picnic table without ...
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0answers
19 views

Please help me find this Adjective [duplicate]

adjective for someone who learns from others' mistakes or experiences. the word has escaped me for a while now. I keep having this blur memory that it ends with '...rous'. words like 'insightful' ...
3
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2answers
217 views

Why must 'galore' be used postpositively?

Just a short while ago, I discovered that the English adjective 'galore', as Merriam-Webster reads, must be used postpositively — e.g., 'bargains galore'. Thus, my question is, what is the ...
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4answers
854 views

One word for “someone who learns from others' mistakes"

Please give me one word for "someone who learns from others' mistakes". The word has escaped me for a while now. I've tried observant but it's still not cutting it for me.
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1answer
114 views

“a high enough” vs. “high enough a”

After editing a question recently, the OP undid those edits stating he did not like the bad changes I made with regards to the grammar of the post. The author originally wrote: Nobody in this ...
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1answer
908 views

What is the Use of an Adjective of the Same Word Twice in the Same Sentence called? [closed]

Is there a name for this type of usage using words (in this case adjectives) repetitively in typical sentence formatting? There has got to be. This is killing me. BTW, I'm no English professor. ...
5
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7answers
1k views

A word used to describe someone who loves to be photographed

I am trying to figure out if there is a word to describe a person who loves to be photographed.
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2answers
182 views

What's it called when someone is crafty and resourceful and creates a solution to a particular obstacle? [closed]

What's it called when someone is crafty and resourceful and creates a solution to a particular obstacle? I saw it somewhere online and blanked on it when I had a golden opportunity. Anyone got me?
2
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6answers
725 views

Word for a smart and stubborn person? [duplicate]

I'm trying to find a single adjective that would fit the best to the following person's trait: One who thinks knows everything/best, and often doesn't listen to orders and instead completes some ...
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1answer
158 views

What adjective (other than “last”) means “most-recent previous”?

If I were to say "the previous item" or "the prior item" or "the preceding item", I could be referring either to the most-recent previous item, or to any other item logically coming before the current ...
2
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3answers
411 views

Proof of concept or proof-of-concept, noun or adjective

From the Oxford English Dictionary at OED: proof of concept n. evidence (usually deriving from an experiment or pilot project) demonstrating that a design concept, business idea, etc., is ...
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6answers
2k views

Word for sadness at something ending, but excited about new

Is there a word that describes the combination of feeling sad for an ending of something, but excited at new prospects. The closest I had was "bittersweet change" Examples: 1) At the end of a ...
65
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30answers
6k views

Is there a word for someone who really has their act together [closed]

Is there a word for someone who really has their act together? Someone who has their time well-managed, is focused, works out, has ambitions, eats right. Not necessarily success, but there's a kind of ...
1
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2answers
105 views

Adjective “displaced” applied to an object

Can I apply the adjective displaced to an object, when I mean it is being used out of its typical environment? For instance: "the displaced ball floats around". (Assuming we're talking about a ball ...
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7answers
804 views

Prefix or adjective meaning “one and a half”

Is there a prefix or adjective that means "one and a half", as "tri-" or "triple" is for "three"? The exact usage I have is to describe "18" in terms of a dozen. Where I live they've started making ...
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4answers
341 views

Adjective meaning “that can be tied”

What is the most common adjective used to describe objects that can be tied. I would think of tieable but it does not seem to exist in the wiktionary.
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3answers
283 views

“X equals Y” vs. “X is equal to Y”

What's the subtle difference between X equals Y and X is equal to Y?
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3answers
228 views

adjective describing a personal difficulty

Trying to think of a word that describes an action that is easily accomplished by most people yet said person cannot. Example: Since fifth grade, I have played the bass in my school orchestra, ...
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2answers
120 views

“The dead” vs. “the dead people”

Which one of these is correct: The dead were buried near the village. The dead people were buried near the village. I tend to think that both are fine, however in my test I chose second ...
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1answer
83 views

Motivated or Motivating

Which answer is correct? The renovation project has been led by a highly _____ group of designers. A) motivated B) motivating If not B, why not?
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2answers
53 views

Usage of the word “antiquarian”

This question concerns the word "antiquarian". Is it a legitimate adjective from the word "antiquity"? I want to say something along the lines of "antiquarian context", to mean context from ...
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1answer
122 views

Which can be true? The importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun

I am confused about the sentence below. Which structure is used: importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun ? In recently years, there has been growing awareness of the importance of ...
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2answers
1k views

“sunk” or “sunken”?

The boat lies half-sunken in the bay. Sunken is an adjective, right? But in the previous sentence, it seems to be acting as adverb modifying lies. Should the sentence be: The boat ...
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4answers
684 views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
4
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2answers
79 views

Can “broken” mean never working to begin with?

Technically speaking can broken be correctly applied to a thing that is not and never was functional? I think there is a connotation that a thing once was functional, but is that required for proper ...
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2answers
92 views

“Disjoint toolsets” vs. “disjointed toolsets”

I have only ever heard the expression there are disjoint sets, never that there are disjointed sets. I believe it should be disjoint sets, but I don't have a good reason why. Does anyone have a more ...
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3answers
165 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
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3answers
4k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
4
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1answer
188 views

What is it called when one word in a sentence “downplays” another?

In sentences such as "I'm a little devastated" "He's a little obese" We tend to think of obese and devastated as being on the more extreme end of the scale when describing something, but what is ...
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2answers
286 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
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3answers
75 views

Softer word for “validated”

I'm looking for a word with less certainty than "validated", as in Has this testimony been validated? I'd like something like "sanity checked" which flows better. Any suggestions?
5
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5answers
165 views

Translation of « débrayable » for camera modes and automatic software processing

I am French and I am looking for how to express the concept of the French word débrayable: Something débrayable is able to be manually configured as opposed of something which is always automatically ...
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1answer
37 views

sham + adjective / noun

I've come across he shams sick Can I say he shams an idiot or he shams pain in his back ? Do I have to use a person or a thing after sham? I know it's a rare word but nevertheless
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3answers
121 views

Do I use adjective forms of concurrent and consecutive?

Should this passage use the adjectival or adverbial forms of concurrent and consecutive? The trial court also sentenced the defendant to five life sentences (with parole) and five 15-year ...
2
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2answers
386 views

Sound you make with your mouth

The word that I can't remember was in a movie where one of the main characters made flower arrangements, and this guy who liked her saw them somewhere on a table in a hallway and tilted the picture ...
6
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5answers
569 views

Usage of 'halcyon' to describe something other than a period of time

Can I use the term halcyon to mean calm or tranquil when describing something other than a period of time, especially a place or setting? For example, does the following sentence seems unnatural or ...
4
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2answers
2k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
1
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1answer
208 views

Saxon Genitive or adjective

When does a noun can be used as a adjective avoiding the use of saxon genitive? I am writing a tittle that states: "FDA's, EPA's, and TTB's regulations", but I would like to avoid using the saxon ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Accredited school versus accredited degree

Is it proper use of the adjective "accredited" to say or write "an accredited degree?" I can't find it used in this manner in a dictionary and I feel like the adjective in this sense should be applied ...
3
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1answer
78 views

A question of nuance: 'amiable' and amicable'

How would an English-speaking person explain the difference between amiable and amicable? Which is the more friendly?
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4answers
420 views

Adjective to describe very abusive language or nature [closed]

I would like to know appropriate adjective(s) to describe a person's abusive language or nature used describe swearing at somebody. Edit: I want a more British and formal English. Something that can ...