Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Turn out “good” vs turn out “well”

Should one say: "turn out good" or "turn out well" I have always preferred the latter, but found the form "turn out good" in the book by Raymond Murphy: "English Grammar in use".
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0answers
40 views

Using parentheses with possessive pronoun

The following statements makes sense It is impossible to doubt that you exist. It is impossible to doubt that your mind exists. However, if I were to add parentheses to the first statement ...
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1answer
38 views

How to emphasize being complimented professionally? [closed]

I would like to say something along the lines that I am honored to accept... (job, award, etc) but without using the term honored as I find it more dramatic sounding (purely my subjective sentiment ...
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1answer
31 views

Adverbs describing Adverbs

We have a similar question here, but I think my examples are a bit different and I would love to understand how this is done correctly. Let's say we are talking about significantly higher ...
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2answers
57 views

Noun corresponding to good

Red describes the color of something. Good describes the _____ of something. What's the most general word that could fit the blank (if there is one)? Some options I've considered: Goodness (I don't ...
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1answer
31 views

one following the other

is it correct to say "one is following the other", when for example referring to cars or persons, or is bad English and I should say "one is following the other one"? Is there maybe a difference in ...
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2answers
95 views

Why did -ful prevail instead of -full for adjectives?

A lot of adjectives in English are based on a noun + the ending -ful. The opposite adjective is usually constructed with the ending -less According to Wiktionary, both endings -ful and -full existed ...
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1answer
89 views

What is the difference between a Whiz deletion and using the present participle as an adjective?

The sleeping babies are adorable. and The babies sleeping are adorable. To me, the two sentences are identical in meaning. However, this doesn't seem to be the case in the following ...
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1answer
61 views

Adjective for someone unable to cope with the past

I'm looking for a word that could describe a character's personality in the sense that he is someone who (re)lives the past too much and is uncapable of overcoming it and moving on with his life. Any ...
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14answers
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Is there a word to describe an individual who has complete control over his negative and positive emotions?

Let's say examples of negative emotions are sadness and despair, and example of positive emotions are happiness and pride. So is there a word that describes a person who has total, complete control ...
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0answers
46 views

Aramean vs. Aramaic?

What is the difference in usage between the adjectives Aramean and Aramaic? It seems that we use Aramaic to describe the language and Aramean to describe the people. But which one should we use to ...
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1answer
41 views

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be?

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be? An example sentence (from research regarding medical monitoring of vital signs): Continuous and automated monitoring is... ...
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13answers
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Is there a word to describe someone who does nice things for others, only to make themselves look or feel good?

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person who does nice things for other people (e.g holding the door open, carrying someone's things) but only for self gain; this person only does nice things ...
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2answers
31 views

The position of an adjective that modifis two nouns

I suggest you choose a noisy restaurant or a fast food restaurant to study rather than a quiet library. Q1. I want to express "a noisy restaurant or a noisy fast food restaurant." But if I use "noisy"...
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1answer
111 views

much natural or more natural?

so I've heard the expression "it sounds more natural" in many English podcasts but as everyone knows "natural" is an uncountable adjective, therefore "much" should be preceded before the adjective. I ...
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2answers
1k views

“Applicable to you” or “Applicable for you”

As the question title suggests, which one of the following is correct? I've sent the file, see if it's applicable to you I've sent the file, see if it's applicable for you Intuitively, I feel #1 ...
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0answers
40 views

In “thin green candle”, can these adjectives be considered cumulative?

I have read that coordinate adjectives can be separated by commas, since both modify the noun, and cumulative adjectives cannot, since the first noun modifies the combination of the last adjective and ...
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2answers
59 views

Is “People exercising everyday are healthy” wrong?

Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right? People exercising everyday are healthy. or do I need to use who+...
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3answers
109 views

Adjectives that describe the language used in a literary text [closed]

In order to analyse a poem, I often need to comment on the diction used. So far, I've been using words, such as colloquial, everyday,simple. Could you provide some adjectives that describe the ...
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4answers
789 views

An adjective for the condition of a used brush

What adjective best describes the weariness and disarrangement that starts to show in your toothbrush when you've used it for some time? Nothing severe; just a little out of shape: It doesn't have ...
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3answers
64 views

usage of “nasty”

I want to describe a little girl who behaves bad. she breaks everything, scares poor animals and can even make an ogre cry. Can I use the term 'nasty' when speak about her? About a child? (She is a ...
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1answer
34 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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2answers
52 views

Degrees of comparison [duplicate]

I believe, both variants are possible: friendlier / more friendly; and the friendliest / the most friendly. I'd like to know what is used in every day speech more often and which is more formal.
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4answers
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What's the one word for a person who generalizes everything? [closed]

I am searching for a word which qualifies a person as someone who makes sweeping generalizations on almost everything and tends to stereotype people. He picks up one trait of a person(something which ...
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1answer
40 views

Can [adjective] [noun] ever describe a broader set than [noun]?

In phrases of the form [adjective] [noun], the adjective is often being used to narrow the set described by the noun alone. For example, "red cars" narrows the set of cars to only include ones that ...
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2answers
91 views

Live curious or live curiously? [closed]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
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2answers
120 views

Unknown addiction [closed]

If I am addicted to something, but I do not know what I am addicted to, is there such a word to describe that? Is it appropriate to use "unknown" addiction, since I am not aware of it? Is there ...
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6answers
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hungry is to starving as thirsty is to? [closed]

When someone is very hungry we say he is starving. How to describe someone who is very thirsty?
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6answers
259 views

Can something be more unique than something else? Can something be very unique? [duplicate]

Family debate - one says that uniqueness is relative, others say something either is or is not unique. Does uniqueness mean that there is only one of a certain thing/person, so that it would mean more ...
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3answers
91 views

Is “not very” considered polite? [closed]

I've heard that if you want to describe something in a negative way but polity, use "not very" + "negative" adj. For example, describing a bad thing would be: This is not very good. Or talking ...
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5answers
291 views

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...
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1answer
108 views

Use of the adjective “young” in the comparative form

Is correct to use the adjective "young" for objects? For example, in a sentence like this: "This painting is younger than that one.", I think it would be better to use "new" for "painting", but then, ...
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0answers
35 views

Adjective meaning “community environment”

I'm trying to say something along the lines of: "Community environment factors include..." I do know that "community environment" is a noun and not an adjective, but I'm stumped for any other ...
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1answer
34 views

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun?

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun, as in the following sentence: "The older told him to stop." Or do I have to use "one", as in: "The older one told him to stop." Thanks in advance!
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1answer
54 views

Repeat Adverb in a list or is one time enough?

[1] ...., which is less efficient and secure against ... [2] ...., which is less efficient and less secure against ... Is it necessary to mention "less" two times as shown in version [2] or is ...
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4answers
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“watch more realistic 3D scenes” & hyphen

Problem: "viewers can watch more realistic 3D scenes and interact..." Do I need to hyphenate "more realistic" here? I think I do, as the compound modifier "more realistic" is modifying "3D scenes"....
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4answers
212 views

Word to describe something which exists both in the mortal world and the afterlife?

I'm trying to find an adjective to describe something - a thing, concept or idea - that transcends the empiric "mortal" world and exists in the afterlife. Specifically, the word should describe the ...
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2answers
42 views

Someone is a … user of a something, to say he is using it daily or a lot?

Is it correct to refer to someone who is using something a lot, by 'a big user of ...'. I'm talking here specially about software usage. Is there an accurate word ?
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4answers
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culturally accepted adjectival antonym of 'non sequitur' [closed]

If one were to coin the adjective 'sequitur' as an antonym of 'non sequitur', would this be generally understood in English? 'Sequitur' is currently an accepted English noun meaning 'conclusion.' ...
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1answer
165 views

What can come after a Possessive Adjective?

This sentence: "Today's my breakfast" means: "Today is my breakfast" But if it is written like: "My today's breakfast" it would mean: "The breakfast I eat today" (literal). "Today" then acts ...
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1answer
86 views

Can I say “I am glad hearing from you” or it is wrong? [closed]

I am glad hearing from you. Is it correct? And does it have a real meaning or it doesn't?
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2answers
537 views

Can adjectives get plural s?

Are the following sentences correct grammatically? 1- The war had two hundred woundeds. (And not wounded soldiers) 2- There are two modals in that sentence. (And not modal verbs) That is, can we ...
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1answer
151 views

I'd like to know if this is a grammatically correct sentence. “I determined to go back to college.”

I know that I can say, I was determined to go back to college., And also that I can use a synonym, but I'd like to know if the above is correct and why/why not. I feel like one is an intent and one a ...
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2answers
62 views

Adjective for serving as an example, validity of exemplative

I want an adjective that describes a noun as something that serves as an example of something. I viewed this ESE discussion but I feel that exemplary doesn't suffice, because it implies bias ...
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3answers
110 views

When to use obsolete or redundant when referring to something that is no longer required? [closed]

I was sending a message to one of our developers internally referring to an element on a page querying whether it was needed or would be used but I paused when I realised that I wasn't entirely sure ...
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4answers
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Which adjective is better to describe 'weather' and 'climate' that they are neither cold nor hot?

There are some adjectives which are used to describe weather, such as hot, cold, wet, dry, fine, nice, etc. I think we can use 'mild' (relatively warm for winter or cool for summer). Or we can use ...
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1answer
42 views

Adjective meaning “like someone else?”

Example in this case: "experiencing _____ speech" More specifically: "She shouted with a deep voice, a voice not her own."
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3answers
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Describe an arm without a forearm

Usually an arm looks like this: Shoulder -- upper arm -- elbow -- forearm -- wrist -- hand. But suppose, because of either chemical poisoning or radiation in utero, Kevin was born without a left ...
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2answers
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English word for so consumed in thought you fail to hear [closed]

For example, someone is going to the mall, and he's so set on getting to the mall that when you call him he does not hear you.
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1answer
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Is an adjective/noun adjunct carried by reference with the word “another”

I am looking for the best interpretation of the phrase: ... if one structured property contains another, only one of them can be repeated. Which is central to a StackOverflow question. In ...