Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Why is the word “Holy” used before swear words?

People usually use the word "Holy" before "Shit", "Crap" or any other bad words to express their feelings, like surprise, anger, etc. Is there any reason why the word "Holy" is used with these bad ...
0
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3answers
79 views

The + adjective + proper name

I recently noticed that the honorific "The Honorable" is often followed by just a name ("The Honorable James Lloyd") rather than a noun ("The Honorable Judge James Lloyd"). That seemed fairly ...
3
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1answer
133 views

When (if ever) is is acceptable to use an indefinite article immediately in front of an adjective? [duplicate]

What's the rule for using a/an before an adjective? I am asking this question because my high school professor is teaching us that we shouldn't use a/an before an adjective. With some 'exceptions' ...
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2answers
75 views

Is “'the most tawdry’ race-baiting” ungrammatical?

When I was transcribing the following sentence of Time magazine’s (September 1st issue) article ’”The Tragedy of Ferguson”; “We elected a black man with a Muslim name to be President. What other ...
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3answers
45 views

Phrase that means a sequence of projects, each of which builds on the previous project.

I'm writing a proposal in which I describe a series of small projects/experiments. The projects start out small and basic, then the subsequent project builds on the results from the prior project. I ...
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2answers
128 views

How to use analogue? What are its adjectival and adverbial forms? [duplicate]

Can we, for example, define good analogously?" Is there an analogue definition of good? I'm using the word good as an example; the word could just as easily be virtuous, intelligent, evil, bad, and ...
0
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4answers
282 views

Adjective for a topic which gives rise to debate or heated discussion

I'm writing a speech on sexism, as it is a topic which quite often gives rise to disputes and heated discussions; is there an adjective to describe such a topic which does so?
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1answer
65 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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4answers
120 views

Word for who professes discrimination based on culture

A person that professes discrimination based on race is a racist. What is the word for defining a person that discriminates based on culture (pretty sure it is not culturist) or social habits? E.g., ...
3
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2answers
307 views

Can I use the adjective as the first word?

Is it okay if I rearrange the sentence The apple on the table was green or The green apple was on the table to put the adjective in front, as the first word, like Green, was the apple on ...
11
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7answers
2k views

What part of speech is “telling” in “that would be telling”?

In the phrase "that would be telling", what is the word "telling"? I think it would be either an adjective or a verb, but which is it? Neither seems to be obviously wrong. I think the former would ...
1
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1answer
422 views

Is “broad variety” in common usage? Better adjective?

A colleague used "broad variety" which sounds odd to me. I would go for "wide range", but is there a commonly used adjective with "variety" that can be substituted?
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4answers
209 views

What is an adjective to describe what this baby is doing? [closed]

I was saving an animated gif (over 2MB in size) to my PC, but couldn't think of what to name it. After a few minutes of staring at [some adjective]baby.gif I figured I'd put it to you guys. I was ...
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2answers
104 views

Word meaning: “of experience”?

I have wondered for years if there is an (adjective?) form of the word: "experience". Obviously, I'm not too much of a grammar Nazi, as I'm not even sure if this would even be an adjective. But, ...
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1answer
4k views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
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2answers
144 views

Which is correct: “A is higher as compared that” OR “A is high as compared to”?

The weight of A is higher as compared that of its counterparts. The weight of A is high as compared to that of its counterparts. Which word is more suitable —'high' or 'higher'?
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2answers
73 views

order of adjectives exceptions [duplicate]

Which is correct "A huge unattractive block of flats" or "An unattractive huge block of flats". What is the word "huge" - an opinion or a size?
3
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1answer
80 views

When a phenomenon, usually a proper name, becomes an adjective

At some point I came across a term for an adjective that has been formed out of a proper noun. It happens often in the music, art and literary world, i.e. "Sufjanian" or "Dylan-esque." Other common ...
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3answers
187 views

Word for song sung by cover band, or not original singer?

I can't remember the word used to describe a song sung by someone else and not the original person. Anyone can help me on that one? Thanks.
0
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1answer
28 views

Can you use “of yours” for a noun that has a superlative adjective? [closed]

I have a doubt about the usage of the pronoun "those" with the pronoun "of yours" like in this sentence: The only one who knows "those" worst secrets of yours is me. I know that if I used only ...
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6answers
696 views

Positive Synonym for Indecisive

Is there a word that describes a person who tries to get as much information as possible when making a decision for fear of committing a mistake that might affect both him and others in a negative ...
2
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5answers
318 views

Is 'lightning' here a noun or an adjective or even an adverb?

Oxford Dictionaries has this example under ADJECTIVE 'lightning': (1) Roman is lightning quick and improving every day in practice, and Bean showed playmaking ability in the preseason. The ...
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6answers
775 views

Is there an adjective for having and spitting lots of saliva, especially in a state of wild, raging abandon?

I'm looking for a word that describes this happy fellow: source: imgur.com I don't think frothing is the right word. It isn't froth or foam, but sticky wads of spit.
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1answer
63 views

A computer program can become stalled or staled? [closed]

What's the correct expression: "This software is stal**l**ed!" or "This software is staled!"
2
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2answers
222 views

Distributive adjectives in sentences with non-count nouns

In the following sentence: "Wall and roof thickness are always considered when repairing a chimney." The sentence refers to the thickness of both the wall and the roof. Is the sentence above correct ...
3
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5answers
602 views

desired vs. desirable [closed]

I have written a paper and the reviewer said me that I must change "a more desired solution" to "a more desirable solution". I am not sure about the differences. I have also some similar usages of ...
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5answers
2k views

Adjective for someone who is really good at cooking or baking and/or bakes frequently

So and so is the most "bakiest" person I know! She's so good at baking! What word could feasibly replace "bakiest" which I obviously made up. :)
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10answers
960 views

Is there an adjective for “cannot be defended against”?

The adjective indefensible is commonly used to describe something that cannot be defended, but it applies to the defender, not to the attack itself. I'm wondering if there's a reasonably neutral word ...
0
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1answer
82 views

Usage of “prevalent” in reference to a disease [closed]

Is it ok to use word 'prevalent' in the following sentence: Flu is very prevalent in the third world countries, that nobody cares about it.
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0answers
85 views

A question to ask about birth rank or serial number [duplicate]

Are you the third of your parents' children? or the second issue? Or, you are the third guy, eh? What is the question for which "he came third in the race" is an answer?. Instead of resorting to ...
2
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1answer
115 views

What do you call the side of a building that is neither the near side nor the far side?

What do you call the side of a building that is neither the near side nor the far side? A friend suggested adjacent. I think that fits, but is there a way to distinguish between adjacent faces of a ...
3
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1answer
255 views

“Shakespearean English” - What English or American writers have adjectives coined after their names?

Shake·spear·ean - adjective \shāk-ˈspir-ē-ən: of or relating to William Shakespeare or his writings. Almost every English speaking person has heard or read something about Shakespearean English. ...
2
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2answers
209 views

A word to describe someone or something that is not last?

I'm looking for a word that describes the state of not being last. A word that would apply to everything in an ordered list that is not the last thing in that list. From I wasn't the last person ...
3
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2answers
296 views

Adjectival form of “consult”, “consultation” – Translation for the German word “konsiliarisch”

The word konsiliarisch is used, for instance, in hospitals when a doctor sends his patient to another branch or medical specialty for some specific examination. You will later return to your actual ...
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1answer
106 views

How to translate these kind of phrases?

I am confused in translating some kind of phrases such as below : Which one of the pairs is true? If both, What is the difference? and what is the meaning of the phrase? (I mean if I want to explain ...
0
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1answer
26 views

the usage of “insalubrious”

Does it make sense to say an insalubrious relationship between two countries? If not, what would be a better replacement? hey this is my first post on this website.. I'm a non-native english ...
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4answers
420 views

Expression for 'One who likes expensive stuff, luxuries, but lacks appreciation?'

What would be an expression for: Someone who wants expensive stuff; someone who wants luxuries, and who lacks in appreciation.
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5answers
759 views

Expression for 'One who cares about one's social rank'

What is a word or expression for someone who cares about what social rank they're in. Someone who wants to have money, something similar to ambitious? Vain is not the word I'm looking for.
0
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1answer
69 views

Adjective form of “degrade”?

For example, I want to say: This book degrades Western culture. In this form: This book has been described as ??? to Western culture. What would the adjective form be? Is "degradeful" a ...
0
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3answers
76 views

Is “willfully disingenuous” a tautologism?

It seems to me that definitions of disingenuous such as the following might imply willfulness: adjective lacking in frankness, candour, or sincerity; falsely or hypocritically ingenuous; ...
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4answers
64 views

Is it right to call a job which has begun to bore you a “plain” job?

What is the best english adjective to identify a job in which you always do the same things over and over and so eventually get bored from it? I read somewhere the sentence "I have a plain job", "I ...
8
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9answers
733 views

What exists between tolerant and enthusiastic?

The use of tolerance comes with varying degrees of indifference to something, with often unstated or deliberately understated degrees of disapproval for that thing. For example, "While I'm tolerant of ...
0
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1answer
992 views

“Unavailable” vs. “not available” [duplicate]

What is the difference between unavailable and not available? In my opinion, unavailable is something that will never be available, while not available is something that is not available right now ...
12
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4answers
5k views

Proper term for knowing four or more languages?

If bilingual means you know two languages, and trilingual means you know three, what would be the proper term for knowing four, five or even six languages?
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2answers
248 views

“I am a legend” vs. “I am legend”

Which sentence makes sense, the first or the second? I am      legend. I am  a  legend.
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1answer
66 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
1
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1answer
75 views

How to say that something doesn't take a lot of memory [closed]

I'm working in small marketing company, and we got a task to promote mobile app, we usually work only with our native language which is Bulgarian, but the client insisted to translate promo text on ...
2
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2answers
230 views

Can something be *slightly* critical? [duplicate]

I overheard someone at work describing a task as "quite critical", and then describe another task as (direct quote) "über critical". Forgetting for a minute the colloquial nature of the conversation, ...
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1answer
160 views

“Curious to learn” vs. “curious to learning”

I know that in case of "looking forward to" I have to use the gerund form. So e.g. I am looking forward to hearing from you. Now I am not sure about this sentence: I am always curious to ...
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1answer
77 views

Adjective and Noun Placement

Is it better to say "We rescued the five people trapped" or "We rescued the five trapped people"? And why?