Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Adjective of “ignore”

The primary meaning of ignore is to disregard somebody. Ignorant is synonymous with unlearned and uninformed. Ignorable assigns somebody or something a low priority. I'm looking for an adjective that ...
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3answers
30k views

What is the correct usage of 'worse' and 'worst'?

I've noticed a lot of people who, according to the way I was taught, misuse the words 'worse' and 'worst'. The way I understand it, 'worse' is for comparisons, and 'worst' is the superlative. But more ...
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9answers
90k views

What is the difference between “complicated” and “complex”?

I can't understand: what's the difference between complicated and complex? They seem to be used interchangeably. Are they actually different at all?
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3answers
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Creating words with “-able” suffix

What are general rules of thumb for creating adjectives with -able? I wanted to denote an object as having an ability to be tiled, but "tileable" and "tilable" both yielded as incorrect words by spell ...
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5answers
328 views

1970-ish: Is it an accepted word? If so, what does it mean?

Modish, youngish, girlish are accepted words. Is 1970-ish accepted too, or even understood to be an English word?
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12answers
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What's the word for “overly proud of your education”?

A friend and I are trying to remember a word to describe someone who is overly proud of their education. An example usage would be: Does that email make me appear too ___? Where the ___ is the ...
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2answers
29k views

Is one more correct: “lucky for me” or “luckily for me”?

Is it "more" correct to say "Luckily for me" or "Lucky for me"? I found a few sites that discussed this (including m-w.com, under the rubric "hopefully") but I'm still not sure if one is specifically ...
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5answers
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What is the difference between “owing to” and “due to”?

"Due to" seems more common than "owing to" in modern English. Is "owing to" simply an old-fashioned way of saying the same thing, or is there a rule to using it?
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2answers
546 views

Is “public listed” an adjective?

The series in the sentence below and its positioning sound awkward. Micro, small and large are all adjectives, but public listed? Has the rule on parallelism been violated? And should anything be ...
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6answers
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Adjectives with Latin etymology when noun has non-Latin etymology

As a non-native English speaker, I always wondered why, for example, you say moon, but then you say lunar (same goes for side and lateral, hand and manual and so forth): in some cases, the noun is not ...
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2answers
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Is “a friend of his” a used phrase?

I know that a friend of mine is a used phrase, but is the phrase also used with other personal possessive adjectives? I met a friend of his.
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6answers
279 views

How would someone who needs to read a story from A to Z be qualified?

When I'm beginning to watch a movie, or read a book, I tend to want to watch or read the whole story through, even if it is a story of questionable quality or if I know the end. And I don't want to ...
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2answers
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Indefinite article in the “An [adjective] [number] [plural noun]” construction

I wasn't sure how best to phrase the title of this question. I'm interested in constructions of the following form: An estimated 50 people died in the bombing. 'An estimated' could be ...
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3answers
1k views

Position of adverb 'globally' in sentence and meaning of sentence

Please help me make sense of this sentence with regards to 'globally'. In the global arena, xxxxxx has been described as the solution to the challenges facing the commodities market globally ...
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4answers
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Missing words in English

For a while I ponder on some words that I have not been able to find. I always wondered why, since English is so huge compared to my native Danish where we do have the following two words: A word ...
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1answer
966 views

Is there a classification for words combined with hyphens used as adjectives?

Is there a term or classification for words (non-adjectives, for lack of a better classifier) that are combined with hyphens that serve the purpose of an adjective? For example, "run-of-the-mill ...
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1answer
702 views

Is this the correct usage of the word “fraught”?

MySpace is fraught with users sending friend requests to people they don't even know.
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Can one be uninnovative?

Can one be uninnovative, or un-innovative? I'm looking for a direct antonym of the adjective innovative. I see an entry at Dictionary.com, but nothing at Merriam Webster (innovative, *uninnovative).
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2answers
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Is there a grammar rule behind the hyphen in the phrase 'one-act play'?

I noticed that the phrase 'one-act play' always uses a hyphen between 'one' and 'act'. Is there a grammar rule in play here, how does it work?
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3answers
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“Economic” vs. “economical”

What is the difference between "economic" and "economical"?
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1answer
313 views

What does 'Reno-era' policy mean?

I saw the following sentence in today's Washington Post article. What does 'Reno-era' policy mean? It's a new word to me. Can somebody tell? Reno-era policy kept Jared Loughner off FBI gun list. ...
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2answers
56k views

“Ongoing” or “on-going”

As per the title, is the proper usage "ongoing" or "on-going" when writing something such as ongoing research projects?
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3answers
4k views

Is it correct to write “a 5-mm-thick layer”?

Do I need hyphens? Should I use the indefinite article or zero article?
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501 views

Can snow be dry?

Disclaimer: There are a lot of questions packed in but their answers are interdependent. Different textures of snow can be described as "wet" and "dry". Considering that water is the quintessence of ...
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3answers
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Is “completely good” proper English? If not, why?

I was recently asked by a Japanese person why completely good was improper English, as in “This is completely good.” As a native speaker of English (raised in northeastern America), I do feel ...
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1answer
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Two adjectives for two nouns

I saw this on a billboard recently We have new and pre-owned cars and trucks Clearly the intention is to modify "cars and trucks" with the two adjectives "used and preowned" and although the ...
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7answers
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Is there any difference between “famous” and “popular”?

Is there any difference between famous and popular?
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1answer
265 views

What does Bloomberg's 'concessionary tone' mean?

I found the phrase 'concessionary tone' in today's New York Times: Bloomberg Is Criticized on Storm Response as He Tours City Beyond Manhattan The mayor on Thursday delivered the message that ...
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2answers
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What is the proper way to mention “current” for future events?

I am writing a software user manual so the topic is about possible situations which its users may come across. Here is an example sentence: The button saves the current URL in the browser. ...
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6answers
953 views

What are antonyms of “tolerant” or synonyms of “cautious”?

I posted the following on Meta Stack Overflow, and I believe that there was a better word that I could have used rather than "a little too harsh". Considering that my post fails all but possibly ...
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2answers
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Is it acceptable to say “more [adjective]” when there is already a dedicated form making “more” unnecessary (e.g. “angrier” vs. “more angry”)?

For years, it irritated me that people kept using "more [adjective]" where there were already dedicated forms making "more" unnecessary. For example, people would say "more tight" than "tighter". I ...
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4answers
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Is 'uniquer' a word?

My spellcheck doesn't complain about 'uniquer'. Is it a valid word? Since unique means "one of a kind", 'uniquer' has no valid definition, but that doesn't prevent it from being a valid dictionary ...
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1answer
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Words pertaining to the senses and the corresponding disabilities

I need help on finding words relating to the senses/perception. I mean this in a neuronic/biological or philosophy-of-mind kind of way. A word for... pertaining to the senses (Is it sensory?) ...
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5answers
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Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?

I want to create a poster titled "An Incomplex Introduction to Complexity-based Cryptography." As you see, it contrasts the words incomplex and complexity. (Words like simple or easy do not provide ...
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5answers
537 views

“the same” and “that particular one”

Consider I'm driving the same car. It sounds like me and someone else share one and the same car. But I could mean that my car is just another copy of the same model of the car. How do I express ...
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“on time” vs. “on-time”

I'm in the "on-time" camp when it comes to describing, for example, delivering something by the deadline. Is this the correct usage?
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3answers
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Is “more poorly” an appropriate phrase?

Today I described someone as being trained to react "more poorly" to a given situation. Her current reaction is poor. It is becoming more poor. So she reacts more poorly. Is this correct? It sounds ...
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4answers
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When would one use “burnt” and when would “burned” be more appropriate?

More out of curiosity than anything, when would one use "burnt" and when would "burned" be appropriate? For example, This coffee tastes burnt. This coffee tastes burned. or They burnt ...
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Words for Product Status labels

I'm working on an app that has to have 3 statuses for products. Here's what we've got so far: Active Maybe Dead Essentially Active products are always allowed, Maybe products can be allowed, but ...
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2answers
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Are there any differences between “supernatural” and “paranormal”?

Are there any differences between "supernatural" and "paranormal"?
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2answers
946 views

An adjective to describe a substance consisting of smaller-size grains

What adjective you would use to describe a substance consisting of grains of smaller size compared to those of another substance? For example, "Milk powder is ______er than sugar". Addition: And if ...
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3answers
729 views

“Brusque” vs. “curt”

What is the diffence between brusque and curt?
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2answers
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Yellow versus orange

I have observed several people over the years refer to something that is orange in color as "yellow". Is that some linguistic difference or a difference in perception?
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5answers
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“Electronic” vs. “electric”

Most people would refer to computers as being electronic, whereas a flashlight would be described as electric. I know the general difference (electronic devices use transistors?), but what is it ...
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3answers
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“Hard” vs. “hardly”

I have always found the pronounced distinction in meaning between "studying hard" and "hardly studying" a bit amusing. What is the origin of the word hardly? How is it etymologically connected to ...
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3answers
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What is the difference between “onerous” and “arduous”?

Is there any difference in the meaning of these words? Which one of them is used the most in everyday conversation? In my vocabulary for both words I've found essentially the same meaning: "difficult ...
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3answers
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Is “caught you unawares” correct?

I read a book and came across "caught you unawares". I kept thinking it's supposed to be "caught you unaware". Is this an acceptable form or was that a typo or something?
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Meaning of “all-new” in advertising-speak

Sometimes hyphenated, sometimes not. Most commonly heard in car commercials, eg "Introducing the all-new 2010 Cadillac SRX Crossover". I've only heard it since moving to the US so perhaps it is a ...
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1answer
576 views

How can I join many adjectives to one word and create a grammatical phrase?

I have to describe an object that is: a pair of round/rounded earrings, made of wood/wooden, with bosses of brass/brass bossed? How can I put it in a single statement? I think that it could be ...
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Why are words such as “that” and “those” not considered articles?

According to Wikipedia (disclaimer: of course I realize that Wikipedia should not be regarded as an absolute authority, but I generally consider it to be a fairly accurate and reliable resource): ...