Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Is 'uniquer' a word?

My spellcheck doesn't complain about 'uniquer'. Is it a valid word? Since unique means "one of a kind", 'uniquer' has no valid definition, but that doesn't prevent it from being a valid dictionary ...
21
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1answer
13k views

Words pertaining to the senses and the corresponding disabilities

I need help on finding words relating to the senses/perception. I mean this in a neuronic/biological or philosophy-of-mind kind of way. A word for... pertaining to the senses (Is it sensory?) ...
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5answers
4k views

Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?

I want to create a poster titled "An Incomplex Introduction to Complexity-based Cryptography." As you see, it contrasts the words incomplex and complexity. (Words like simple or easy do not provide ...
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5answers
531 views

“the same” and “that particular one”

Consider I'm driving the same car. It sounds like me and someone else share one and the same car. But I could mean that my car is just another copy of the same model of the car. How do I express ...
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3answers
30k views

“on time” vs. “on-time”

I'm in the "on-time" camp when it comes to describing, for example, delivering something by the deadline. Is this the correct usage?
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3answers
3k views

Is “more poorly” an appropriate phrase?

Today I described someone as being trained to react "more poorly" to a given situation. Her current reaction is poor. It is becoming more poor. So she reacts more poorly. Is this correct? It sounds ...
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4answers
46k views

When would one use “burnt” and when would “burned” be more appropriate?

More out of curiosity than anything, when would one use "burnt" and when would "burned" be appropriate? For example, This coffee tastes burnt. This coffee tastes burned. or They burnt ...
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5answers
336 views

Words for Product Status labels

I'm working on an app that has to have 3 statuses for products. Here's what we've got so far: Active Maybe Dead Essentially Active products are always allowed, Maybe products can be allowed, but ...
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2answers
2k views

Are there any differences between “supernatural” and “paranormal”?

Are there any differences between "supernatural" and "paranormal"?
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3answers
17k views

Present Progressive or Present Continuous?

What is the correct term used to describe this tense in English — Present Progressive or Present Continuous? I see both terms used in grammar books.
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2answers
939 views

An adjective to describe a substance consisting of smaller-size grains

What adjective you would use to describe a substance consisting of grains of smaller size compared to those of another substance? For example, "Milk powder is ______er than sugar". Addition: And if ...
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3answers
718 views

“Brusque” vs. “curt”

What is the diffence between brusque and curt?
8
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2answers
486 views

Yellow versus orange

I have observed several people over the years refer to something that is orange in color as "yellow". Is that some linguistic difference or a difference in perception?
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5answers
51k views

“Electronic” vs. “electric”

Most people would refer to computers as being electronic, whereas a flashlight would be described as electric. I know the general difference (electronic devices use transistors?), but what is it ...
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3answers
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“Hard” vs. “hardly”

I have always found the pronounced distinction in meaning between "studying hard" and "hardly studying" a bit amusing. What is the origin of the word hardly? How is it etymologically connected to ...
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3answers
3k views

What is the difference between “onerous” and “arduous”?

Is there any difference in the meaning of these words? Which one of them is used the most in everyday conversation? In my vocabulary for both words I've found essentially the same meaning: "difficult ...
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3answers
17k views

Is “caught you unawares” correct?

I read a book and came across "caught you unawares". I kept thinking it's supposed to be "caught you unaware". Is this an acceptable form or was that a typo or something?
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4answers
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Meaning of “all-new” in advertising-speak

Sometimes hyphenated, sometimes not. Most commonly heard in car commercials, eg "Introducing the all-new 2010 Cadillac SRX Crossover". I've only heard it since moving to the US so perhaps it is a ...
4
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1answer
575 views

How can I join many adjectives to one word and create a grammatical phrase?

I have to describe an object that is: a pair of round/rounded earrings, made of wood/wooden, with bosses of brass/brass bossed? How can I put it in a single statement? I think that it could be ...
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2answers
3k views

Why are words such as “that” and “those” not considered articles?

According to Wikipedia (disclaimer: of course I realize that Wikipedia should not be regarded as an absolute authority, but I generally consider it to be a fairly accurate and reliable resource): ...
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3answers
764 views

Das Keyboard Refurbished Professional Model S: What does “Refurbished” mean?

Everything is in the question, so I copy/paste: Das Keyboard Refurbished Professional Model S: what does "Refurbished" mean?
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2answers
3k views

“How deep” or “How deeply”?

In the sentence: How deep or deeply should I study something? Which of the two is more appropriate?
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3answers
5k views

What is the difference between “good” and “well”

Most of the time, I use good and well interchangeably. However, on many occasions I would find well or good a misfit. Please suggest the proper usage.
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15answers
96k views

What is the adjective form for the word “integrity?”

I'm looking for the adjective form of "integrity." Instead of "Be a person of integrity," I'd like to say something like "Be [one word I'm looking for]" I did a Google search for this, but I also ...
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3answers
828 views

Is it possible to form adjective “morally” by deriving it from the noun “moral” (as in “of the story”)?

Recently I used the word morally as an adjective formed from the noun moral. The concept I wanted to describe was that some statement is morally correct if you are able to agree with it intuitively ...
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1answer
334 views

Is “sophisticated” appropriate in formal documents?

In German the word sophisticated is sometimes used as Anglicism in order to describe a very fashionable person, e.g. carrying a dog in a handbag ("It-Girl"). However, when looking up the word in a ...
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3answers
1k views

A word for the meaning of “over-constrained”

I want to express that I constrained something too much such that it is contradictory now. At first sight, over-constrained seems to fit, but I am not sure whether it is fine to use in a scientific ...
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2answers
457 views

Chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped?

Is it chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped? And with what kind of former words to use "-" properly?
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5answers
2k views

What other alliterative phrases have become inseparable? [closed]

Just asking out of idle curiousity. There are some words that just always seem to be found together, such as strong, silent type cool, calm and collected cheap and cheerful Can you ...
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6answers
58k views

Is “funnest” a word?

We seem to be stuck at an impasse on this issue. Is funnest a word or not? If so, does it mean "most fun"?
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13answers
37k views

What is a good replacement for “ununderstandable”?

I want to tell a colleague of mine I'm doing something that will prevent her from getting "ununderstandable" errors. I have: ...so that you will not get unnecessary, [ununderstandable] errors. ...
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4answers
52k views

“In the last 3 months” vs “in the past 3 months”

What's the difference between in the last 3 months and in the past 3 months if there is any?
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1answer
907 views

Are both the “special” and the “needs” in “special needs” adjectives?

In the sentence, "she is a special needs child" (referring to someone with a disability), what parts of speech are the words "special needs"? Are both adjectives on their own, or do they only form an ...
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5answers
6k views

Can “prior” or “previous” be used to describe the same month of last year?

If I want to show the comparison between rate in 2010 Jan and 2009 Jan, which of the following should I use? Comparison of rate between 2010 Jan and its prior month. Comparison of rate ...
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4answers
10k views

Which is correct: 'Drafty' or 'draughty'?

I have been changing 'drafty' for 'draughty', or because of my confusion, removing the word altogether while subbing online articles. I'd appreciate guidance on which term is correct for UK English. ...
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3answers
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Is there a difference between “eatable” and “edible”?

I thought only edible was correct, even Google suggested edible when I did a search to see which one was more popular on the internet: Edible: 17.2 million Eatable: 2.2 million The first results ...
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5answers
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“Undistinguishable” vs. “indistinguishable”

Is there a difference between these two words? To me, it seems that undistinguishable is more where you can't tell what it is, and indistinguishable seems to be where they're the same. It seems a lot ...
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1answer
744 views

Referring to some attribute of an inanimate object — use “who's”?

This came up in describing an input to a function: A handle to the daemon who's name is desired. (Daemon is a type of process on a system.) Somehow, "who's" just doesn't seem right because it's ...
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9answers
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How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem

Have you ever had a case where you felt compelled to include strange things like a double that in a sentence? If so, then what did you do to resolve this? For me, I never knew whether it was ...
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2answers
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What is the difference between 'Muslim" and 'Islamic'?

I have seen 'Muslim' and 'Islamic' both used as adjectives to describe things relating to Islam. Is there a nuanced difference between the two words? I know that 'Muslim' can also be used as a noun, ...
19
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2answers
1k views

How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen?

For example, "file system" and "related". Is it "file system-related"? It will appear as if it is a compound of "file" and "system-related", won't it?
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3answers
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Possessive of a word that is already possessive

If the cricket ground Lord's is a possessive, what if you want to describe something belonging to Lord's? Would you say: I was very impressed by Lord's's customer services. It doesn't look ...
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10answers
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Word to describe “fleeting, wandering and prone to drifting off” of thought

I was wondering if someone could help me find a word based off of my description. I would like a word that means something along the lines of "fleeting, wandering and prone to drifting off" or ...
16
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4answers
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Should I use “ related” or “-related”

What is the correct use of the term "related?" For example, should I use it like computer related, or is it more proper to use computer-related (where the word "computer" is just part of my ...
13
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1answer
6k views

Are the words “mandatory,” “obligatory,” and “compulsory” interchangeable?

As a non-native speaker, I wonder what the rules are for preferring one of "mandatory", "obligatory" or "compulsory" over the others. The Corpus of Contemporary American English yields examples such ...
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5answers
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Is “such a cooler” proper English?

I'm trying to say something like "that's such a cooler design". Is there more valid expression that expresses the same thing? Or is this okay English? I guess "that design is so much cooler" would ...
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5answers
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Why is it “your Majesty”, but “my Lord”?

Why is it "your Majesty", but "my Lord"?
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3answers
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Are there any patterns to observe in choosing the correct negation prefix to use?

Are there any patterns to observe in choosing the correct prefix to use? There are other prefixes as well, but these are usually the ones I mix up. As in unbelievable, disproportionate, asymmetric, ...
11
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3answers
4k views

“Backward” versus “backwards” — is there any difference?

The dictionaries I've looked in don't distinguish between these two words, backward and backwards (at least when used as adverbs). Is there some real historical, grammatical or regional difference ...
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Do adjectives ending in “-ed” derive from words that were once used as verbs?

Talented derives from talent, which is not a verb in Modern English. Has talent ever been used as verb? Are there any words ending in -ed that derive from words once used as verb that is not used ...