Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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2answers
47 views

Is there an adjective meaning a wide trajectory? [closed]

I need an adjective that tells that the trajectory of a projectile (in this case, a snowball) was wider than higher and fills in this blank: "The _____ snowball hit the wall the other team made to ...
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1answer
42 views

be confused the use between adjective and adverb when it is in front of adjective [duplicate]

How to use adjective and adverb correctly without being confusing. In this case because when I translate this sentence from my mother language to English, it fairly seem to be the same. Please help me....
2
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1answer
67 views

What expression describes a person who knowlingly invests in a scam? [closed]

What word or phrase describes a person who invests in an enterprise that he knows is a scam or Ponzi scheme? Can the word or phrase refer to a person who votes for a politician who repeatedly tells ...
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3answers
59 views

Word for academic fields that are aligned with a political movement or position?

Is there a word or phrase for academic fields that are aligned with a political movement or position? For example: Feminist studies is aligned with feminism. African American studies is closely ...
6
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3answers
182 views

Is there a word to describe the direction in which the sun's main rays come from?

In the northern hemisphere, houses are aligned so that windows face the south. In the southern hemisphere, houses are aligned with windows to the north. So, for example, we have this building advice:...
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1answer
77 views

Can one form an adverb from any adjective?

I'm trying to form the following sentence: ...we can talk more substantiatively in the event that X occurs. The term "substantiatively" isn't in either the computer dictionary or online at m-w....
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1answer
103 views

something full of/ a full something of

Can somebody explain the difference here and give some more appropriate examples on the construction? I sense there IS something, but I can't get to it individually. a bowl full of mush a full bowl ...
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2answers
110 views

What is wrong with the expression 'most perfect', and the adjective-forms 'rounder' and 'squarer'?

Here is an excerpt from the textbook High School English Grammar & Composition, by Wren & Martin (2005 edition by S. Chand, New Delhi): Certain adjectives do not really admit of comparison ...
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1answer
103 views

An adjective for shopping

If culinary is a word related to cooking or food, like a 'culinary experience', what would be a similar word for shopping?
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1answer
52 views

Whence come “Alaskan” and “Hawaiian” as adjectives?

Ross Douthat, writing in the New York Times, refers to "Rubio’s lonely Minnesotan triumph." This just sounds wrong to me. Is "Minnesotan" ever used as an adjective? Garrison Keillor frequently invokes ...
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4answers
67 views

Word for “full of content” [closed]

Suppose I want to say that the document is full of content(text, images etc) what do I say? Is contentious the right word?
2
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4answers
87 views

Why do adjectives such as; ‘proud’, ‘aware’, ‘capable’, and ‘afraid’ collocate with the preposition 'OF'? [closed]

The preposition of is used in all the following: be proud of; be aware of; be afraid of; be fond of; be capable of; be jealous of; be envious of, etc. I know it might sound ridiculous, but I have ...
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15answers
2k views

What is a word/phrase to describe someone who thinks someone else is perfect? [closed]

What is a word/phrase to describe someone who thinks someone else is perfect? For instance, if parents think that their child can do no wrong, then they are . . .? (Not necessarily biased or partial, ...
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1answer
87 views

Latitude is to longitude as lateral is to

Suppose we have a laser emitting a beam in the general direction of a target. Let P be the point nearest to the target, along the beam. "Range" is a word commonly used for the distance to an object. ...
3
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3answers
147 views

adjective or adverb before ing-form?

Let's consider the example sentence Alice's trying to frame him had left Bob wary of anything she might do or say in his presence. If I now wanted to express that Alice allegedly tried to frame ...
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2answers
269 views

Words or phrases to describe how street beggars typically look?

I'm writing a scene in which I wish to describe a typical street beggar - his way of dressing in particular. Check for example such a dude as the one below I could use descriptions such as: ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Is “tennis” an adjective in “tennis coach”? [duplicate]

Is "tennis" an adjective in "tennis coach"? My english teacher thinks so, but using my native language as a reference it doesn't seem right to me...
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5answers
1k views

Word for a male with a nice body? [closed]

What is a common adjective to describe a guy with a nice physique?
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3answers
57 views

Adjective for 'having ID'

I am a software developer. I would like to use an adjective to name a set of items where each item has its own unique identifier (ID). The name should not necessary stress that the items are unique, ...
3
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4answers
461 views

Turn out “good” vs turn out “well”

Should one say: "turn out good" or "turn out well" I have always preferred the latter, but found the form "turn out good" in the book by Raymond Murphy: "English Grammar in use".
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0answers
39 views

Using parentheses with possessive pronoun

The following statements makes sense It is impossible to doubt that you exist. It is impossible to doubt that your mind exists. However, if I were to add parentheses to the first statement ...
0
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1answer
37 views

How to emphasize being complimented professionally? [closed]

I would like to say something along the lines that I am honored to accept... (job, award, etc) but without using the term honored as I find it more dramatic sounding (purely my subjective sentiment ...
2
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1answer
29 views

Adverbs describing Adverbs

We have a similar question here, but I think my examples are a bit different and I would love to understand how this is done correctly. Let's say we are talking about significantly higher ...
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2answers
57 views

Noun corresponding to good

Red describes the color of something. Good describes the _____ of something. What's the most general word that could fit the blank (if there is one)? Some options I've considered: Goodness (I don't ...
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1answer
29 views

one following the other

is it correct to say "one is following the other", when for example referring to cars or persons, or is bad English and I should say "one is following the other one"? Is there maybe a difference in ...
2
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2answers
86 views

Why did -ful prevail instead of -full for adjectives?

A lot of adjectives in English are based on a noun + the ending -ful. The opposite adjective is usually constructed with the ending -less According to Wiktionary, both endings -ful and -full existed ...
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1answer
82 views

What is the difference between a Whiz deletion and using the present participle as an adjective?

The sleeping babies are adorable. and The babies sleeping are adorable. To me, the two sentences are identical in meaning. However, this doesn't seem to be the case in the following ...
6
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1answer
60 views

Adjective for someone unable to cope with the past

I'm looking for a word that could describe a character's personality in the sense that he is someone who (re)lives the past too much and is uncapable of overcoming it and moving on with his life. Any ...
14
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13answers
2k views

Is there a word to describe an individual who has complete control over his negative and positive emotions?

Let's say examples of negative emotions are sadness and despair, and example of positive emotions are happiness and pride. So is there a word that describes a person who has total, complete control ...
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0answers
45 views

Aramean vs. Aramaic?

What is the difference in usage between the adjectives Aramean and Aramaic? It seems that we use Aramaic to describe the language and Aramean to describe the people. But which one should we use to ...
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1answer
39 views

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be?

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be? An example sentence (from research regarding medical monitoring of vital signs): Continuous and automated monitoring is... ...
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13answers
5k views

Is there a word to describe someone who does nice things for others, only to make themselves look or feel good?

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person who does nice things for other people (e.g holding the door open, carrying someone's things) but only for self gain; this person only does nice things ...
0
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2answers
29 views

The position of an adjective that modifis two nouns

I suggest you choose a noisy restaurant or a fast food restaurant to study rather than a quiet library. Q1. I want to express "a noisy restaurant or a noisy fast food restaurant." But if I use "noisy"...
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1answer
100 views

much natural or more natural?

so I've heard the expression "it sounds more natural" in many English podcasts but as everyone knows "natural" is an uncountable adjective, therefore "much" should be preceded before the adjective. I ...
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2answers
609 views

“Applicable to you” or “Applicable for you”

As the question title suggests, which one of the following is correct? I've sent the file, see if it's applicable to you I've sent the file, see if it's applicable for you Intuitively, I feel #1 ...
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0answers
40 views

In “thin green candle”, can these adjectives be considered cumulative?

I have read that coordinate adjectives can be separated by commas, since both modify the noun, and cumulative adjectives cannot, since the first noun modifies the combination of the last adjective and ...
2
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2answers
59 views

Is “People exercising everyday are healthy” wrong?

Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right? People exercising everyday are healthy. or do I need to use who+...
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3answers
104 views

Adjectives that describe the language used in a literary text [closed]

In order to analyse a poem, I often need to comment on the diction used. So far, I've been using words, such as colloquial, everyday,simple. Could you provide some adjectives that describe the ...
11
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4answers
784 views

An adjective for the condition of a used brush

What adjective best describes the weariness and disarrangement that starts to show in your toothbrush when you've used it for some time? Nothing severe; just a little out of shape: It doesn't have ...
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3answers
63 views

usage of “nasty”

I want to describe a little girl who behaves bad. she breaks everything, scares poor animals and can even make an ogre cry. Can I use the term 'nasty' when speak about her? About a child? (She is a ...
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1answer
30 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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2answers
46 views

Degrees of comparison [duplicate]

I believe, both variants are possible: friendlier / more friendly; and the friendliest / the most friendly. I'd like to know what is used in every day speech more often and which is more formal.
2
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4answers
356 views

What's the one word for a person who generalizes everything? [closed]

I am searching for a word which qualifies a person as someone who makes sweeping generalizations on almost everything and tends to stereotype people. He picks up one trait of a person(something which ...
1
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1answer
39 views

Can [adjective] [noun] ever describe a broader set than [noun]?

In phrases of the form [adjective] [noun], the adjective is often being used to narrow the set described by the noun alone. For example, "red cars" narrows the set of cars to only include ones that ...
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2answers
87 views

Live curious or live curiously? [closed]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
3
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2answers
118 views

Unknown addiction [closed]

If I am addicted to something, but I do not know what I am addicted to, is there such a word to describe that? Is it appropriate to use "unknown" addiction, since I am not aware of it? Is there ...
10
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6answers
2k views

hungry is to starving as thirsty is to? [closed]

When someone is very hungry we say he is starving. How to describe someone who is very thirsty?
3
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6answers
238 views

Can something be more unique than something else? Can something be very unique? [duplicate]

Family debate - one says that uniqueness is relative, others say something either is or is not unique. Does uniqueness mean that there is only one of a certain thing/person, so that it would mean more ...
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3answers
90 views

Is “not very” considered polite? [closed]

I've heard that if you want to describe something in a negative way but polity, use "not very" + "negative" adj. For example, describing a bad thing would be: This is not very good. Or talking ...
2
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5answers
285 views

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...