Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

14
votes
16answers
4k views

English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?

I am looking for a word that means “a process that you keep doing, hoping that you will learn something useful, but which you actually never learn anything from”. I'm quite sure that there is an ...
2
votes
4answers
227 views

A single word meaning 'easy yet powerful'?

I'm looking for a single adjective to describe a piece of software which is very easy to use, but has powerful features for users who have access and knowledge. It's for a succinct marketing ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Meaning of “drawn by hunger and pride” when describing a face

When Rayber had first opened the door in the middle of the night and had seen Tarwater's face - white, drawn by some unfathomable hunger and pride - he had remained for an instant frozen before ...
2
votes
3answers
107 views

Term for numbers that have at least one non-zero significant digit after the decimal point?

So, a number that is nothing but fractions is "fractional". A number that has a whole number and a fraction is "mixed", if you want to call it that. And the portion after the decimal point is called ...
8
votes
5answers
8k views

“Lower number” vs. “smaller number”

Is −9 a smaller number than −8? And is −9 a lower number than −8? What is the difference between lower and smaller here?
49
votes
10answers
7k views

Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged? [closed]

Most grammar checkers are capable of detecting the the misuse of "your" and "you're"; providing the necessary correction. I'm curious though, is there any sentence that can be constructed where ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

Is a phrase 'your happy being' correct?

My friend asked me to the beach with this sentence: The beach is waiting for your happy being. Is the sentence he used correct?
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between “common” and “mutual”? [closed]

What is the difference between "He is our common teacher" and "He is our mutual teacher"?
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Why are some “-ist” suffixed words used as the adjective form over the more common “-istic”?

Generally speaking, for any kind of "-ism", the suffix "-ist" produces the noun form and "-istic" produces the adjective form. But there are some "-ist" suffixes that are acceptable or even more ...
5
votes
2answers
14k views

What is adjective form of “initiative”?

Merriam-Webster says "initiative" can be also an adjective, however, it is adjectival from "to initiate", meaning "introductory" or "preliminary". What is then the correct adjective of "initiative" as ...
6
votes
5answers
7k views

What's an antonym to “legacy”?

I am struggling to find out what the best and shortest way is to describe the opposite of a legacy system (especially in software architecture, where legacy means the system used previously). I need ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

“identical with” vs. “identical to”

I find myself always wondering which is the grammatically correct expression or, provided that both are correct, whether there are differences between their meaning. One example: Passage A in this ...
15
votes
5answers
138k views

What is the difference between “sardonic” and “sarcastic”?

Basically, sardonic and sarcastic both stand for mocking gestures, but what is the difference in their contextual use? Are there any other words that represent a similar gesture?
0
votes
2answers
69 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
1
vote
1answer
426 views

Is “broad variety” in common usage? Better adjective?

A colleague used "broad variety" which sounds odd to me. I would go for "wide range", but is there a commonly used adjective with "variety" that can be substituted?
-3
votes
1answer
41 views

What's the proper way: Forever Lucky, or Lucky Forever? [closed]

The title says it all, what's the proper way to say it? Also, could you please explain me the why one is the right form, and the other is the wrong form? Thanks.
3
votes
3answers
171 views

“Attendant with” vs. “attendant to” vs. “attendant of”

Can the adjective attendant be used with the prepositions with, to, or of, and, if so, which is preferable? For example, I could say, "This manual describes the operation of the product and its ...
12
votes
6answers
4k views

Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?

"My female cousin working for a finance company was dismissed. Disappeared along with her job were her confidence and smiling face." There is a very complicated system in Chinese for naming ...
2
votes
6answers
128 views

Adjective for “something in which you always find something new”

Or alternatively, "something in which you're always able to find/discover something new". An example: A book, which you read multiple times, and every time you read it, you see a whole new aspect ...
3
votes
4answers
59 views

Looking for adjective - classic word for devoid of embellishment

I recall coming across a word in an article that just spoke to me and described my approach to creativity. The context it was written in referred to a creative piece devoid of unnecessary ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

“Unexplainable” vs “Inexplicable”

What is the difference between unexplainable and inexplicable? Are they exact synonyms or are there situations where one is preferred over the other? Is unexplainable a clumsy modern variant ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?

For example: `Form A` is able to anticipate any kind of input. Like, can take in Japanese characters, block illegal characters, and any other sort of characters. Hence, `Form A` is _____ble. ...
3
votes
2answers
359 views

Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts [duplicate]

What determines whether something is a "noun adjunct" or just a garden-variety adjective? Does it matter in any meaningful way? Here is my hypothesis, but I can't find any authoritative source to ...
-2
votes
5answers
193 views

word for: someone who does not share or like to share easily [closed]

I am looking for a word a friend used the other day to describe people who do not share easily. They need to be asked repeatedly not because its a secret but simply because they cannot or do not want ...
19
votes
5answers
13k views

“Extensible” vs. “extendible”

Where does the adjective form extensible come from and does it connote anything different than extendible? What's the difference, if any, between the two?
3
votes
2answers
4k views

What is the difference between “blurry” and “blurred”?

The two quotes below discuss the same topic. Terry's tortured season took a surreal twist on Tuesday when a blurry image resembling him appeared on cigarette packets in India. GUARDIAN A ...
6
votes
4answers
869 views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a ...
22
votes
7answers
3k views

Treacle is viscous; alcohol is ____?

What's the best adjective to describe the low viscosity of liquids such as water and alcohol? One that came to mind is 'runny', but then some honeys are runny, despite actually being inherently ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

What's the opposite of hypochondriacal?

A hypochondriacal person is someone who is excessively preoccupied with and worried about his or her health. Is there a term for the other end of the spectrum --somebody extremely carefree, ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Equivalent of words appropriate to damage for healing [closed]

I'm creating a game and in it, it is possible to damage or heal living things, as you would expect. I've decided that different kinds of things can have one of three reactions to certain types of ...
18
votes
8answers
2k views

Is my worst enemy my best friend (interpreting negative adjectives applied to negative nouns)? [closed]

"The worst student" is the student who is bad at things. In this case, "worst" simply describes the noun. Following this logic, your "worst enemy" would be the person who is very bad at being your ...
0
votes
2answers
292 views

A word describes the person who tends to stereotype people

Is there a word/adjective (single word) that describes the person who likes consiously or uncousiously to stereotype people? I was thinking that there might be a word such as stereotypist, but such a ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

The order of noun-modification patterns in IT

For example: The field Media/Media field contains all necessary information about the content. The Address section/section Address is located in the lower section of the window. Does the right ...
5
votes
5answers
147 views

Is “missing person” considered a compound noun?

In the phrase missing person, is the whole phrase a compound noun or would missing be considered an adjective that modifies person? It seems like in many situations when it is used with other ...
11
votes
3answers
3k views

Is there a difference between “eatable” and “edible”?

I thought only edible was correct, even Google suggested edible when I did a search to see which one was more popular on the internet: Edible: 17.2 million Eatable: 2.2 million The first results ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

What's the difference between “neural” and “neuronal”?

Is it that something that is neuronal has to do with neurons, while something that is neural has to do with nerves or the nervous system? Is something that is neuronal necessarily neural? Or does it ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Correct usage for “bad” v. “poor” adjectives

The way I was taught many years ago was that something like quality can be poor, but not bad. The reasoning was that "bad" is a value/moral whereas poor applies to non-value qualities. In this case, ...
26
votes
15answers
6k views

A word for: someone who is easy to talk to

I want to convey the idea that such and such person is very easy to talk to. I know that: 'talk to-able' is not a word, obviously. I can always say, "He is very easy to talk to." But I am looking ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Mathematical Institute or Mathematics Institute: Which of these is correct and why? [closed]

Many titles of universities or research institutes have a variety of adjectives before the noun institute. Example: Oxford University and Chennai have a Mathematical Institute each. Then, there are ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Why does English have a word for pink? [closed]

We have a word for light red (pink), but not light blue. Why is this? Russian, for example, has specific words for light and dark blue.
-1
votes
2answers
159 views

which adjective should i use for family of someone [closed]

I want to write a happy new year letter for someone(not very close, business partner) what adjective should i use in regard to his family for example : Dear Family , respectful family , beloved family ...
1
vote
2answers
140 views

Using adjectives after verbs?

In a lot of sentences when speaking people use adjectives after verbs. In some examples it sounds right, however, and I was wondering if such uses were valid in formal writing. The only example I ...
16
votes
4answers
7k views

Is there a rule for which suffix to use when creating adjectives from nouns?

There are many suffixes that are used to create adjectives from nouns (-al, -ic, -ive, -y). Are there any rules used to create adjectives from nouns? In example, why is the adjective excessive, and ...
-3
votes
1answer
76 views

Plural adjective not followed by noun [closed]

Here is my sentence Hughes writes in a style in which phonetics and stress are not fully working in tandem Can I be understood here, and is it grammatically correct? phonetic fəˈnɛtɪk ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

What do you call a person who thinks a lot?

Is there any specific word for a person who is always involved in processing a thought? I could find synonyms for 'deep thought' - contemplation, rumination and so on. But I couldn't find if there ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Adjective describing a person who does work to get it done

I have a friend who always goes on that I have a bad work ethic, though I am not lazy. At the same time, he says he has a good work ethic, but is lazy. The definition of having a good work ethic is ...
2
votes
2answers
65 views

*free of charge* used with other adjectives and a noun

Do you write or say other adjectives before or after the adjective free of charge used together with a noun? Is it better to put other adjectives before or after free of charge? Do you put an ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Using short adjectives as adverbs, such as “easy” & “short”

I know that some adjectives (such as easy & short) can be used as adverbs in some situations, but when can this happen and what adjectives does this apply to? This definitely works: "He stopped ...