Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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How to emphasize being complimented professionally? [closed]

I would like to say something along the lines that I am honored to accept... (job, award, etc) but without using the term honored as I find it more dramatic sounding (purely my subjective sentiment ...
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4answers
994 views

untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
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1answer
109 views

“…the pleasure enjoyed” – placement of adjective?

A person should not think that happiness is the total pleasure enjoyed. In this sentence, "enjoyed" comes after the subject it describes, even though it is not a phrase or clause. I thought only ...
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55 views

Noun corresponding to good

Red describes the color of something. Good describes the _____ of something. What's the most general word that could fit the blank (if there is one)? Some options I've considered: Goodness (I don't ...
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1answer
28 views

one following the other

is it correct to say "one is following the other", when for example referring to cars or persons, or is bad English and I should say "one is following the other one"? Is there maybe a difference in ...
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2answers
71 views

Why did -ful prevail instead of -full for adjectives?

A lot of adjectives in English are based on a noun + the ending -ful. The opposite adjective is usually constructed with the ending -less According to Wiktionary, both endings -ful and -full existed ...
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3answers
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What color does ‘pale thing’ have?

I'd like to focus in on the meaning of 'pale' which is used in color description. My dictionary, OALD, says 'pale' in such case means "light in colour; containing a lot of white". It shows me some ...
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2answers
3k views

Can you begin a sentence with an emotion?

Is it incorrect to begin a sentence with an emotion? For example: "Afraid and alone, he no longer wished to continue on." I'm translating some work from a foreign language into English, but I ...
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2answers
167 views

“It's 20 meters thick” versus “It's a 20-meter-thick layer.”

I know that both of these expressions are correct, but I'd like to be able to explain exactly why the first one is correct. Of course compound adjectives are hyphenated (second expression), but in the ...
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1answer
53 views

Adjective for someone unable to cope with the past

I'm looking for a word that could describe a character's personality in the sense that he is someone who (re)lives the past too much and is uncapable of overcoming it and moving on with his life. Any ...
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1answer
61 views

What is the difference between a Whiz deletion and using the present participle as an adjective?

The sleeping babies are adorable. and The babies sleeping are adorable. To me, the two sentences are identical in meaning. However, this doesn't seem to be the case in the following ...
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1answer
264 views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
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6answers
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word for false nostalgia

Is there a word to describe nostalgia for things that never existed? For example, a 1950s-style diner is supposed to reconstruct a cultural archetype, but there never existed such a diner. John Wayne ...
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2answers
61 views

Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?

I have a phrase "Frequent Automatic Renewals". Must there be a comma, or should I separate them with an "and"?
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12answers
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Is there an adjective for “cannot be defended against”?

The adjective indefensible is commonly used to describe something that cannot be defended, but it applies to the defender, not to the attack itself. I'm wondering if there's a reasonably neutral word ...
2
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1answer
98 views

Word that describes a clown who weakens an argument by taking a side

When there is more than one side in a debate, an argument can be weakened by someone who is seen as stupid or a joker if they are vocal about it. This invalidates your beliefs because if crazy person ...
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7answers
825 views

What adjective is/will be used to describe the scope of all things within a solar system?

For example: when we look up news stories online, or tune in on TV, we are being given news reports that fall within a spacial scope. Local news: City and surrounding county. Regional news: "Pacific ...
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0answers
42 views

Aramean vs. Aramaic?

What is the difference in usage between the adjectives Aramean and Aramaic? It seems that we use Aramaic to describe the language and Aramean to describe the people. But which one should we use to ...
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2answers
130 views

What is an adjective for something that can anticipate any input?

For example: "Form A" is able to anticipate any kind of input. Like, can take in Japanese characters, block illegal characters, and any other sort of characters. Hence, "Form A" is _____ble. ...
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2answers
783 views

Is there a word for a person who's obsessed with lights?

I need to know if there exists a word for a person who's obsessed with lights. The formation lights make etc.
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13answers
4k views

Is there a word to describe someone who does nice things for others, only to make themselves look or feel good?

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person who does nice things for other people (e.g holding the door open, carrying someone's things) but only for self gain; this person only does nice things ...
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1answer
34 views

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be?

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be? An example sentence (from research regarding medical monitoring of vital signs): Continuous and automated monitoring is... ...
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0answers
39 views

How to find the correct noun that a relative or adjective clause corresponds to?

Its easy to identify the correct noun when the clause modifying that particular noun is immediately followed. But how to identify the correct noun when the noun is not immediately followed by the ...
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2answers
28 views

The position of an adjective that modifis two nouns

I suggest you choose a noisy restaurant or a fast food restaurant to study rather than a quiet library. Q1. I want to express "a noisy restaurant or a noisy fast food restaurant." But if I use ...
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2answers
663 views

Adjective for exclusive/selective/picky with positive connotations

I'm working with a friend who's looking for a word/phrase to describe her clientele. She's good enough and well-respected enough that she commands top dollar in her field and usually only works with ...
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2answers
168 views

“Applicable to you” or “Applicable for you”

As the question title suggests, which one of the following is correct? I've sent the file, see if it's applicable to you I've sent the file, see if it's applicable for you Intuitively, I feel #1 ...
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Exact adjective of “conundrum”

I am about to coin the word 'conundrous' because I needed it (and I think it deserves a place in the dictionary)! I would like comments on what you think about that (in the context of a serious ...
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5answers
269 views

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...
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0answers
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In “thin green candle”, can these adjectives be considered cumulative?

I have read that coordinate adjectives can be separated by commas, since both modify the noun, and cumulative adjectives cannot, since the first noun modifies the combination of the last adjective and ...
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2answers
17k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
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Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged? [closed]

Most grammar checkers are capable of detecting the the misuse of "your" and "you're"; providing the necessary correction. I'm curious though, is there any sentence that can be constructed where ...
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3answers
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What is the etymology of “yellow”, and why is it so different in other European languages?

It seems like most of our names for colors come from our German roots (blue/blau, green/grün, red/rot, etc.). But yellow is gelb in German, amarillo in Spanish, jaune in French, and giallo in Italian. ...
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2answers
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Is “People exercising everyday are healthy” wrong?

Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right? People exercising everyday are healthy. or do I need to use ...
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Adjectives that describe the language used in a literary text [closed]

In order to analyse a poem, I often need to comment on the diction used. So far, I've been using words, such as colloquial, everyday,simple. Could you provide some adjectives that describe the ...
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4answers
10k views

“How far” vs “How long”

I am not clear how to use "How long" and "How far". Suppose I got in a taxi or cab to my hotel, how should I say to the driver if I want to know the distance to the hotel? Which of the following is ...
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1answer
50 views

Which preposition to use with “unbecoming”?

It is easy when you say something becomes or unbecomes someone. In this case, no preposition is needed. It is another story when the verb turns into the adjective “(un)becoming”. I would like to ...
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3answers
63 views

Is there any particular rule for specific colours in adjective order?

I read here that there is a general rule to write an adjective order. But I didn't find any explanation if the rule has a specific order for colours, especially for primary colours. This may sound ...
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4answers
766 views

An adjective for the condition of a used brush

What adjective best describes the weariness and disarrangement that starts to show in your toothbrush when you've used it for some time? Nothing severe; just a little out of shape: It doesn't have ...
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2answers
81 views

What is a word for “giving more meaning to something than it deserves?”

Or something that tries to convey more meaning to you than it deserves to. It's an adjective similar to "condescending." I'm almost certain the word starts with an "e."
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7answers
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Use of the word “referable”

Can the word "referable" be used to denote something that can be referenced and what is the difference between "referable" and "referenceable"?
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usage of “nasty”

I want to describe a little girl who behaves bad. she breaks everything, scares poor animals and can even make an ogre cry. Can I use the term 'nasty' when speak about her? About a child? (She is a ...
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2answers
193 views

phrase or theory that describes “if he can do it then so can I”

What is the phrase or psychological term that describes someone who gains confidence based off of another's performance? Moreover, they use it as a motivational foundation and it relates to behavioral ...
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2answers
34 views

Degrees of comparison [duplicate]

I believe, both variants are possible: friendlier / more friendly; and the friendliest / the most friendly. I'd like to know what is used in every day speech more often and which is more formal. ...
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4answers
231 views

What's the one word for a person who generalizes everything? [closed]

I am searching for a word which qualifies a person as someone who makes sweeping generalizations on almost everything and tends to stereotype people. He picks up one trait of a person(something which ...
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6answers
1k views

Is there an adjective for having and spitting lots of saliva, especially in a state of wild, raging abandon?

I'm looking for a word that describes this happy fellow: source: imgur.com I don't think frothing is the right word. It isn't froth or foam, but sticky wads of spit.
32
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6answers
23k views

“Extensible” vs. “extendible”

Where does the adjective form extensible come from and does it connote anything different than extendible? What's the difference, if any, between the two?
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1answer
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Can [adjective] [noun] ever describe a broader set than [noun]?

In phrases of the form [adjective] [noun], the adjective is often being used to narrow the set described by the noun alone. For example, "red cars" narrows the set of cars to only include ones that ...
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2answers
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Live curious or live curiously? [closed]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
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2answers
116 views

Unknown addiction [closed]

If I am addicted to something, but I do not know what I am addicted to, is there such a word to describe that? Is it appropriate to use "unknown" addiction, since I am not aware of it? Is there ...
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6answers
2k views

hungry is to starving as thirsty is to? [closed]

When someone is very hungry we say he is starving. How to describe someone who is very thirsty?