Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Word meaning “two paragraphs previous”

Is there a word that can be used to mean two previous places? I want to reference something two paragraphs ago; former would work if it was only one before, and I cannot use penultimate because it may ...
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2answers
187 views

Meaning of “sharp”

Context (New York Times): Still, rooms were large by the city’s pint-size standards, service was sharp, and for the moment, they offer some of the best values around. Does sharp here mean ...
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3answers
342 views

A word similar to lofty [closed]

I'm looking for an adjective that means lofty, intangible, hard to incorporate into every day life, not down-to-earth. It would describe an idea or concept. ETA: Example of sentence I would use it ...
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1answer
250 views

What is the meaning of ‘something blind’?

The phrase “Something ugly, slimy, and blind” is confusing me. Here are my questions. What does the 'blind' part mean? Is ‘something blind’ a special expression? (For I couldn’t find its example in ...
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2answers
6k views

Why does ‘you’re on’ mean ‘I agree’?

One dictionary says ‘you’re on’ is used tell someone that you accept a bet or an invitation to compete against them. Then why does it use ‘you’ instead of ‘I’? What’s the ‘on’? In terms of the ...
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3answers
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“Next Friday” vs. “This Friday” [duplicate]

Duplicate: What day is next Tuesday? I have always considered next Friday to be not this coming Friday, but the one after. This Friday is the Friday at the end of this week. I have a ...
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5answers
4k views

What's the opposite of “dogmatic”?

I'm trying to describe an approach that doesn't just blindly follow established opinion, but seeks validation through experimentation. Any ideas?
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3answers
524 views

Do listeners understand different adjective orders?

I found Adjective order, but I keep wondering if listeners actually understand what I mean when I don't follow that order. For example, if I say, "a lovely long white coat," I may change it to "a long ...
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1answer
695 views

Is ‘eclectic bunch’ trendy instead of simply saying ‘a group of different types of constituents'?

I found the words ‘eclectic bunch’ in the following sentence of a New York Times (July 29, 2011) article reporting increase in foraging in city parks, which is titled ‘Enjoy Park Greenery, City Says, ...
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1answer
232 views

Does ‘magnificent head’ sometimes mean ‘magnificent hair’?

While searching the Net, ‘magnificent head’ shows me a lot of lion’s heads, but I found ‘a woman with a magnificent head’ in a book. “Fleur Delacour, though she demonstrated excellent use of the ...
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1answer
5k views

Differences between “different”, “divergent”, “disparate” and “distinct”

What are the differences between different, divergent, disparate and distinct?
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7answers
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“Ineffectual” vs “ineffective”

Skeptics argue that these kinds of initiatives are doomed to remain perennially peripheral and ineffectual. Intuitively, changing ineffectual to ineffective in the sentence above seems to ...
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0answers
179 views

Is there a difference between “elfish” and “elvish”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When to use “Elven”, “Elvish” and “Elfic”? The dictionary seems to think that they are the same. Here are their definitions: ...
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4answers
1k views

A word that means "un-waning''

I wanted to use the word "unwaning" (or, perhaps, un-waning), as in "for his unwaning enthusiasm". However, no decent (online) dictionary I've consulted seems to recognize it. What other word would ...
2
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1answer
713 views

Usage of “contributive” vs. “contributory”

Which of the two is more correct? contributory capacity or contributive capacity (referred to the capacity of a province in ancient Mesopotamia to contribute to state demand for foodstuffs)
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5answers
3k views

“Multiple different” or “different” or “multiple”

I have seen a lot of people using multiple different when only different or multiple would have conveyed the meaning just as well. Is this correct usage? I know that sometimes doubling the words is ...
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4answers
515 views

What does 'a beautifully-proportioned room' mean?

“Oh I would never dream of assuming I know all Hogwarts’ secrets, Igor,” said Dumbledore amicably. “Only this morning, for instance, I took a wrong turning on the way to the bathroom and found ...
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7answers
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What does “canonical” mean?

Sometimes I read a sentence containing the word canonical, but I cannot find appropriate meaning of the word. For example, in this link: Returns a canonical representation for the string object. ...
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2answers
1k views

Looking for an adjective describing a system with small number of assumptions (or rules)

I am looking for a word that can be used to describe a system (or a model) with a small number of rules or assumptions. For example, the number of grammatical rules in Japanese is much lower than in ...
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2answers
2k views

Can 'repeat' be an adjective?

I was sure the word 'repeat' could be an adjective; for example, the phrase "repeat performance" describes a performance that is repeated. To my surprise, however, the Random House dictionary and ...
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1answer
52k views

“Simpler” or “More Simple” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” Which of these two terms is correct? If they are both ...
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5answers
23k views

What does “pneumatic” mean when applied to a person?

For example, in this review of the movie Unknown, Mark Kermode refers to Liam Neeson's character's wife as being played by "X-Men's pneumatic January Jones". I'm never quite sure whether this refers ...
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1answer
7k views

Abbreviation for “so-called”

In German there is an abbreviation for so genannt, which is sog. Is there a known popular abbreviation for the equivalent so-called in English?
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3answers
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Interpretation of “Are you engaged?”

What's the meaning for engage in the conversation below: Are you engaged, Margaret? Of course I'm not. Why do you ask, Nicholett? I only wanted to practice my English. Oh, I see. You want to ...
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11answers
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What's the inverse of “scalable” — capable to be broken down further and further?

If something is scalable that means that the project is able to operate as it gets bigger. What's the inverse of this? Suppose I have something that is big, but it can be broken down into subsections ...
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6answers
40k views

An adjective for “able to see the big picture”

Is there a formal word to describe someone who sees not just the particulars, but also the bigger picture?
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3answers
663 views

What does “a slightly overblown cartoon figure” mean?

“Harry! Good-o!” said Bagman happily, looking around at him. “Come in, come in, make yourself at home!” Bagman looked somehow like a slightly overblown cartoon figure, standing amid all the ...
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6answers
590 views

Is the word “single” necessary to be added when specifying a thing?

I think the word single is not necessary because the article a or an has done the job. So the phrase "a single object" should be simplified as "an object". What do you think?
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4answers
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“Pricey” vs. “Pricy”

I've recently encountered these two variations of the spellings for the informal word for "expensive." My dictionary and the online dictionary seem to indicate that both of these spellings are ...
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1answer
171 views

“Are you happier?”

I was reading an English book. This is a snippet of a conversation below: But please tell us... do you like your job? Are you happier? I am confused at happier. Why not use happy?
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10answers
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What other word can we use in place of “helpless”

I am looking for an English word I can use sometimes in place of helpless. I have the word in my language, but I am not able to find it in English. The word which we say sometimes if we feel that we ...
2
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3answers
845 views

Adjective for not first but either second, third, fourth, etc

What is an adjective for something that is not first but either second, third, fourth, etc? We don't need to know what position it is at; the only thing that matters is that it's not the first one. ...
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5answers
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What is a good substitute for “echoey”?

As in "an echoey room". People do use this word in speech, but it isn't proper in writing. I thought of "echoing", but that implies that something is currently making an echo, whereas what I'm ...
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7answers
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Better than premium

Is there something higher (better) than the word premium, or does it mean the best? Also, is there something in between premium and deluxe? Graphically: Does any word fit here? > Premium > Does any ...
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5answers
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What is the difference between “illicit” and “illegal”?

What is the difference between "illicit" and "illegal"? Are they just synonymous? Used in different contexts?
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4answers
963 views

How to write dashes in “a 2-4-room-apartment”?

I want to write in the announcement a description of an eventual apartment, which I am searching as a rental. I am interested in apartments with 2, 3, or 4 rooms. How should I write the compound ...
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3answers
4k views

What color does ‘pale thing’ have?

I'd like to focus in on the meaning of 'pale' which is used in color description. My dictionary, OALD, says 'pale' in such case means "light in colour; containing a lot of white". It shows me some ...
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3answers
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What is the reasoning behind the “urban” slang word “tight” coming to mean “cool/great/slick”?

How and why did the word tight come to be appropriated in this sense, for example as in, "That car is tight, cuh!" ? I mean, one easily extrapolates from the "normal" definition to understand why ...
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2answers
14k views

“Melted” vs “molten”

Is there any difference (e.g. regionality) between the two forms of the past participle of melt (melted and molten)?
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1answer
724 views

Meaning of “intriguing” in the following sentence

Reading comprehension is one of the most important parts of any management entrance examination and a bit intriguing as well. Does it mean: Challenging? Interesting? Provocative? All these ...
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2answers
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Correct usage for “bad” v. “poor” adjectives

The way I was taught many years ago was that something like quality can be poor, but not bad. The reasoning was that "bad" is a value/moral whereas poor applies to non-value qualities. In this case, ...
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2answers
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Synonyms and antonyms for “lacking” or “missing” when something is mandatory

I am searching for the correct term usage in my Java code, although you don't need to know anything about programming to answer my question. My "something" can be "required" (mandatory) or not ...
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3answers
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It's raining today or it's rainy today?

When you're writing a diary, you might start with "It's sunny today" or "It's cloudy today." When it comes to rain, which should it be? It's rainy today. It's raining today. It may be ...
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4answers
7k views

What's the difference between “ludicrous” and “ridiculous”?

What's difference between ludicrous and ridiculous? Are they completely synonymous?
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2answers
1k views

Which is correct: “full context” or “complete context”?

"For the full context, see this." vs. For the complete context, see this." Are both identical in meaning? Do I need the article "the"? Please explain.
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3answers
6k views

Using 'very' with a noun

Are these correct ways to use very with a noun? She is the very girl I want. On the very year of 2012, comes the end of the world. This is the very company everyone wants to work for. ...
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3answers
6k views

Why is “busy” pronounced “bizzy”?

Of all the ways I could come up with to pronounce the word "busy", "bizzy" would be very low on my list. At least "bussy" or "boosy". Why "bizzy"?
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12answers
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What is the difference between “quicker” and “faster”?

What is the correct word to use here and why: I will get there quicker [than you] vs. I will get there faster [than you] There must be similar adverbs for "slower".
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What is the difference between “electric” and “electrical” and their usage?

What is the difference between electric and electrical and their usage? For example, what is the difference between "electrical machine" and "electric machine"?
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4answers
559 views

Meaning of Early Modern English “iuie”

I found this phrase in Featherstone's Dedication at the front of an English translation of the Commentary on John by John Calvin: It is an old saying, (Right Honorable,) and no lesse true then ...