Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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What's the comparative for the word “modern”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” What's the comparative for the word modern?
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What's the difference between “big” and “large”?

What's the proper way to say: a large family or a big family? What's the difference between them?
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3answers
653 views

Word referencing time of creation

I've been wondering if there is a word to express that something was current at the time of its creation. It (in bold) should plug-in into a sentence similar to: The results are based on an ...
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599 views

Why is “insatiable” pronounced as if it was “unsatiable”? [closed]

Why is insatiable pronounced as if it was unsatiable?
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Is there an adjective for acedia?

The Oxford dictionary list "acedia" as: noun literary another term for accidie Origin: early 17th century: via late Latin from Greek akēdia 'listlessness', from a- 'without' + kēdos ...
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When to use “Elven”, “Elvish” and “Elfic”?

Well, these are three adjectives for "something from the elves". But I'm spanish and in my language there's only one adjective for these (élfico), and I can't understand what's the difference.
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Dangling -y on made up adjectives

Sometimes I adjective my verbs (as opposed to verbing my nouns), making up a new word in the process: Friday nights are unwindy nights (unwindy night ~= night for unwinding) If I do this, is ...
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What does “ad-hoc” mean?

I read some articles that used ad-hoc like an adjective. Questions: What exactly does it mean in this paragraph: Needless to say, all of that is pretty painful and error prone. Sure, once ...
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Difference in usage of “regular”, “usual”, “ordinary”, “normal”, “common”

Sometimes it is obvious which of the following words to use, sometimes not: regular usual ordinary normal common For example: "regular coffee" (not usual, normal or ordinary) , "ordinary people" ...
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What's a good word for a lack of concentration?

I'm looking for an adjective that describes not concentrated. Something like "flying around", "not really here". In hebrew it would've been מעופף.
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Which is correct here: “arbitrary” or “arbitrarily”?

Do you say "an arbitrarily small constant epsilon" or "an arbitrary small constant epsilon"? Or are both correct?
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How do you create the adjective form of an irregular verb such as “read”?

If I understand correctly, some adjectives can be derived from verbs. For example, an interested person is someone who is interested in me, and an interesting person is someone who is interesting to ...
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Is “unredactable” a word?

I googled it and even though it's been used on the Web, I can't find any entries for it on online dictionaries. If it's not a real word, then is there a good equivalent? The context is a record ...
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Origins of the word “terrible” [closed]

What are the origins of the word "terrible". Do the words "terror" or "terrific" come from the same roots? I am curious since I believe the word "terrible" can be used to mean "great" in French.
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What adjective means “sequential” as it applies to words or numbers?

Is there an adjective to mean "sequential in ascending order" regardless of object type (word or number)? I need the word to imply "alphabetical" if the object is a word; or "numerical" if the object ...
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3answers
319 views

Why do we refer to the “yellow pages”? [closed]

Why was the color yellow chosen? Why not the green pages or blue pages?
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Where does gender attach in “brotherly/sisterly”?

If Leia loves her brother Luke, does she feel sisterly love (because she is his sister) or brotherly love (because he is her brother)?
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602 views

Is “it is a fun game” correct?

"It is a lot of fun," sounds correct, but not, "it is a fun game." Isn't fun a noun? Then why is it used as an adjective? I have heard this usage even by literary giants, so this cannot be a common ...
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What are the distinctions between “authoritarian”, “totalitarian”, and “dictatorial”?

I'm giving a talk about technology (specifically the Internet) in various governments where freedoms are strongly constrained. I'm a technologist, and I have little experience with words used to ...
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What's the difference between “suasive” and “persuasive”?

What's the difference in usage between suasive and persuasive? I just read the former used, here on this StackExchange, where the latter would have worked perfectly, IMO. Is there a subtle ...
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Meaning of the “forthcoming” in this sentence

I'm going to be as forthcoming as I can be, Mr. Anderson. from The Matrix.
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“Push” is to “pushable” as “enable”/“disable” are to what?

If you can push something you could say it is pushable. What do you say about something which you can enable and about something which you can disable?
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1answer
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How did the word “sheer” come to have such different meanings?

There are sheer cliffs and sheer fabrics. Why does the same word mean "vertical" in one case and "transparent" in the other? Did they develop from different roots? And what about sheer obstinancy and ...
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2answers
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When should I use “parallel” over “parallelism”, and vice versa?

I am a bit confused about the words parallel and parallelism: When and where should one use which?
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A word for 'relating to taste' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Pertaining to the Senses Sound is to aural as smell is to olfactory as touch is to tactile as taste is to... what? I can't think of a word that describes the sense of ...
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Is the adjective “abject” ever found with any word other than “poverty”? Does it mean something other than “very” or “utterly”?

Reading over an answer at the Skeptics StackExchange, it occurred to me that I had never really seen the adjective abject used with any other word other than poverty. Has abject become inexorably ...
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What is the meaning of “two-sidedness”?

What is the meaning of "two-sidedness"? I'd like a direct or indirect definition.
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What is an adjectival complement in English?

How can one determine what an adjectival complement is in an English sentence? Are there are any subcategories to this classification? I'd love concrete examples, to help me better understand this ...
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Adjective form of “adjective”

What is the adjective form of the word adjective? I wanted to say something like adjectivial but that's not a word.
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Is the word “bespoke” associated with Southern American English, kind of how “bonafied” is in my mind? [closed]

Is bespoke associated with the American South, as "bonafied" (bona fide, properly) is to me? When I hear the latter, it brings to mind aristocratic Southern gentlemen sipping mint juleps; when I hear ...
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Cognitive capacity and (memory) capacity

I'm having difficulty finding the appropriate form of the word memory that would fit my title. It probably isn't memorial as that's a noun. What would you suggest?
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Better use of “that that” — or not [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem I sometimes seem to write myself into using 2 thats in succession, as in: "Now that ...
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What's the difference between “well-lighted” and “well-lit”?

This question has been on my mind since I first read Hemingway's story, "A clean well-lighted place". I have never heard "well-lighted" in my life other than in this story. I have heard that a room ...
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Hyphen or no hyphen when modifying an adjective with a quantity?

I have a sentence which has an object that is described with an adjective: We need to inform our interested patrons of this change. If I modify "interested" with "more" or "less", do I connect ...
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What is the opposite of “steep”?

In rock-climbing, we describe an incline as "steep" (which is anything from 90 degrees to overhanging) but we don't have a good word to mean "not steep". At least I've never heard anyone use one; ...
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“strongly” or “strong”?

Is strongly correct in the following, or should it be strong? ... and had a strongly Protestant and unionist identity. What is the explanation in grammar terms? Context.
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Is there any difference in meaning between “faith” and “blind faith”?

To use the term blind faith, is to use an adjective needlessly. I had heard the above quote from a positivist friend some time ago. Also, the dictionaries define "faith" as a "belief that is ...
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2answers
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What's the difference between “neural” and “neuronal”?

Is it that something that is neuronal has to do with neurons, while something that is neural has to do with nerves or the nervous system? Is something that is neuronal necessarily neural? Or does it ...
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7answers
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“I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you”

What is the correct usage? Apparently it is "I feel badly", but but wouldn't that mean you have an inadequate ability to feel?
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Usage of the word “sensual” with music

Is it right to say sensual music? What is its meaning when used like this?
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What is correct in this case, “probable” or “probably”?

I usually don't have trouble distinguishing when I should use an adjective and when an adverb. But today I wrote a sentence, and wasn't sure — actually, the longer I looked at it, the longer both ...
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“Instant” vs. “instantaneous”

What is the difference between instant and instantaneous? Which is correct in this sentence? It had an almost __ response time.
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Multiple comparatives of different types: how to choose?

I have an eight-month-old daughter. Her experiments in mobility led me to contemplate phrases like the dirtier and messier, the better. What happens if one (but not both) of the adjectives ...
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Positive-sounding substitute for “dull”/“boring”?

I was recently writing a testimonial, and I wanted a positive substitute for those words. The adjective is for describing the guy in question (i.e. He is a _____ guy). Any ideas?
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Does 'symbolic' mean the same as 'symbolical', and should one be preferred?

Wikipedia's article on vespers contains this passage (my emphasis): The name, however, by which it was most widely known during that period was Lucernalis or Lucernaria hora (l. c., 126). This ...
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Meaning of “I feel so helpless”

What is the phrase "I feel so helpless" supposed to mean? Is it "I feel as though I am unable to offer help" or "I feel as though no one could help me?" I saw it in a movie, and always thought it ...
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2answers
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“Scientific” versus “scientifical”

Is there any substantive difference in the meanings of these two words? Is the latter considered a proper word at all? If the answer to either of the above questions is yes, what are these words' ...
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How did the “-ish” suffix come to denote the approximate meaning of the word it is attached to?

I only know the suffix is currently informalish. What is its provenience? What was the original meaning?
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Why are 'blueish' and 'bluish' both considered correct spellings?

My nine year old son fought hard on this and is taking a stand on spelling bluish as blueish. I'm certain his teacher will mark it as a spelling error in his writing... Several dictionaries have ...
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What is the difference between “fine” and “good”?

What is the difference between fine and good? Please suggest the proper usage.