Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
4answers
5k views

Is “uncollaborative” a word?

I am describing a process as being antithetical to collaboration. To clarify, I'm referring to its quality as being "not naturally collaborative", not "actively anti-collaboration" Is "...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Does “smug” imply anything about correctness?

My local dictionary supplies this definition: having or showing an excessive pride in oneself or one's achievements I was recently told by someone that, "It is only 'smug' if it isn't literally ...
6
votes
5answers
48k views

Is the word “granular” a synonym for the word “specific”?

I often hear the words "granular" or "granularity" being used around colleagues at my office to specify level of detail. For example: Does the running category have to be more granular? We ...
8
votes
1answer
830 views

What are the rules for the use of words that have a variant ending in -al? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it “geometric” but “theoretical”? “Electric” vs. “electrical” I think I'm clear on the difference between word pairs ...
2
votes
7answers
760 views

Add more adjectives to “[noun] is both [adjective] and [adjective]” structure [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Equivalent of “both” when referring three or more items? Consider this statement: Salads are both tasty and delicious. Is there a natural way to use that ...
4
votes
3answers
12k views

How to describe someone who doesn't listen well [closed]

How would you describe someone who doesn't listen well? I don't mean someone who has hearing problems. I mean someone who doesn't finish listening and starts interrupting the conversation.
2
votes
5answers
507 views

Adjective for the likes of someone who consistently has a hard time finishing what s/he has started?

What adjective would you suggest for the like of someone who consistently has a hard time finishing what s/he has started? I thought of the word "distracted", but I don't feel it's sufficient to ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

What adjective would you use to describe someone who uses the right vocab consistently?

I thought of precise, but not entirely sure even after checking a dictionary. Would you think it is the best choice?
2
votes
2answers
450 views

Compound adjective “free-molecule” vs. “free molecular”

I've been asked by a reviewer to change all occurrences of "free-molecule", which I use consistently throughout my manuscript, to "free-molecular". Typical usage examples: "particles colliding in the ...
3
votes
3answers
915 views

Adjective describing possession by someone else

Is there any adjective in English that would describe a quality of belonging or being in the possession of someone else who is not the speaker? In short, what adjective would you substitute for the ...
8
votes
2answers
4k views

What do you call moving a word to change a sentence's meaning?

Prosodic stress is stressing different words to change meaning: I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.) I didn't take the test ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

What adjective would best describe this difference between two doctrinal stances?

What adjective would be suitable here to describe this particular difference between two doctrinal stances? ... Well, as the matter of fact, neither "Mormons" nor "Jehovah's witnesses" are ...
1
vote
4answers
6k views

What part of speech would “color” be in, “Mercury is the color red”? [closed]

Mercury is red. Mercury is the color red. Red is describing Mercury. What part of speech would color be?
13
votes
8answers
54k views

“Experienced” vs. “seasoned”

Are these two words interchangeable? According to the Oxford dictionary, experienced means having knowledge or skill in a particular job or activity, while seasoned having a lot of experience in a ...
4
votes
4answers
682 views

Is “nuancedly” an existing word?

I was typing the following sentence in Microsoft Word: This theme is outlined more nuancedly in this novel. but it marked the word "nuancedly" as being non-existent. I did a search on Google ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the adjective for the attitude displayed in this situation?

I'll describe a situation that might sound random and sudden, but I'm sure we keep seeing now and then; I'd like to know if there's any suitable adjective that you can think of. 'Oily' and 'smarmy' ...
0
votes
7answers
9k views

Use of the word “referable”

Can the word "referable" be used to denote something that can be referenced and what is the difference between "referable" and "referenceable"?
4
votes
2answers
733 views

Original use of kosher in the English lanuage

Recently I saw a post on the meta.rpg.se site that asked When is editing your answer not kosher?, and it got me thinking. Why is the word Kosher used, instead of, for example, Halal, Permissible, or ...
28
votes
11answers
3k views

Single word for people who are like “a frog in the well”

Is there a single word describing someone who is like a frog in a well? The frog believes the well is the entire world. How can I describe people who think that their own small environment is the ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

“Dead simple..” vs. “Really simple..”

I'm writing copy for a new web application and I'm having some trouble with it. On one headline I've written "It's dead simple ...", but while my client was reviewing it he asked if this is not too '...
11
votes
7answers
27k views

Word for people who buy things because they are more expensive/ for the brand

Is there a word for people who buys things because they are more expensive or because they are specific brand or label? These people don't buy the items because they are higher quality. They buy them ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Is there a comparative form of the word “different?” [closed]

Does the adjective "different" have a comparative form? If so what is it?
7
votes
5answers
34k views

“Newly found” vs. “New Found”

What is the grammatically correct way to say the following sentence? "I have come away with a new found respect for the author..." or "I have come away with a newly found respect for the ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “[I am] possessed of impeccable grammar” correct, idiomatic, or ironic?

If it's a correct, non-idiomatic usage, is "possessed" an adjective, or...? What is "of" under that circumstance?
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Usage - lone lonely loner

Is it proper to call someone a lone lonely loner? I take lone to mean the only, lonely to mean feeling sad and loner to mean someone who prefers being alone. So, the usage kind of makes sense to me....
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Adjective or adverb describing promotion of self or group one belongs to

Is there an adjective or adverb depicting self-promotion (or promotion of a group one belongs to)? I am thinking of something that has a somewhat negative connotation, in the spirit of phrases ...
7
votes
5answers
8k views

Adjective pluralization

A 16-year-old girl. She is 16 years old. I've read somewhere that the reason the year in the first example is singular is that it functions as an adjective, and adjectives can't be plural. ...
0
votes
3answers
119 views

“Iran diplomats return to heroes' welcome”

That's an example of the type of headline increasingly seen in the media - I first noticed the trend on Sky News but it seems to have become endemic. To my mind the example above should read "Iranian ...
8
votes
2answers
24k views

What is the difference between “definite” and “definitive”?

I still get confused between the two as English is not my mother language. I tried the following links to understand but still couldn't: thefreedictionary.com/definitive grammar-monster.com/...
0
votes
2answers
209 views

Is micropreneur or micropreneurial correct as an adjective?

A micropreneur is basically an micro-entrepreneur. In the following phrase, is micropreneur or micropreneurial correct? A micropreneur software company
6
votes
3answers
683 views

“Are you sure sure” — is this repetition grammatically correct?

A typical conversation among members of my age demographic could go like this: Person 1: Did you know that x > y?!? Person 2: Are you sure? Person 1: Yeah, I'm sure. Person 2: Are ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What kind of rain is “sprinkles”?

It appears that MSN Weather has chosen an amusing adjective (from my British point of view) for the weather today: I'm assuming the precipitation (sadly) won't contain any hundreds-and-thousands. ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”? [closed]

I heard this in a movie yesterday: That is great an option! Why didn't he say: That is a great option! How does grammar desribe such inverted phrases? Where should I use this inverted ...
25
votes
4answers
6k views

“Bad with something” or “bad at something”?

In a question on Spanish.StackExchange, a question came up about expressing that you are bad at remembering or doing something. Is one "bad at something" or "bad with something" (nouns)? What about "...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

“Are they American?” or “Are they Americans?”

What is the difference bewteen Are they American and Are they Americans?
4
votes
5answers
457 views

“How large is your hard-drive” vs “How big is your hard-drive?”

When referring to a hard-drive's capacity (In GigaBytes), is it correct to use any of the following: How large is your hard-drive? How big is your hard-drive? Or is there any better way for terming ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

What adjective describes incorrect assumptions?

I wanted to apologise for making incorrect assumptions in some correspondence and wrote "I apologise for my presumptive wording". Then I looked up "presumptive" and see it means: Providing a ...
2
votes
3answers
336 views

-ed and -ing adjectives

What is the difference? I am interesting in mathematics. versus I am interested in mathematics. Murphy intermediate grammar Unit 97 tells me that I cannot use the former. Extended and ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Are there differences between “all-day lunch” and “all day lunch”?

What are the differences between: All-day lunch All day lunch for example: all-day lunch from 12.00-18.00 The dictionary say all-day means available throughout the day, but is the hyphen ...
5
votes
2answers
472 views

What are general rules to form this superlatives: “adjective + most”?

I happen to find superlatives with the structure below: Adjective + most, which are: the rearmost, the frontmost, the uppermost, the headmost, the outermost, the topmost, etc. What are the ...
9
votes
3answers
591 views

Verbed color names and “-en”

"whitened", "blackened", and "reddened"; but "yellowed", "grayed", and "blued". Is there some rule or is it just one of those things? "Greened" makes sense; no one is going to say "greenened". "...
19
votes
4answers
2k views

“Bride” is to “bridal” as “groom” is to …?

Instead of taking a bridal portrait, my niece and her fiancé had photos taken together which she insisted on calling groomals. While I guess this term is the accepted name for this new trend, I ...
-4
votes
1answer
434 views

Adj + Noun + Verb to be + Same Adj

Is this a natural grammar or some kind of joke/internet meme? Cute girl is cute. Poor child is poor. Troll topic is troll.
1
vote
4answers
6k views

Adjective of “heritage”

I want to say that my city has a great combination of _ structures and an ever growing urban life. What adjective of heritage (or other word if suitable) can I use here?
11
votes
3answers
29k views

Difference between “classical” and “classic”

What's the difference between classical and classic? Should we say classic content in textbooks or classical content in textbooks?
-3
votes
4answers
545 views

“Free bacteria!” on mineral water bottles [closed]

When I was traveling in Vietnam 15 years ago, I had great fun discovering on mineral water bottles the proud advertisement Free bacteria!. Is it common in English that the position of the adjective (...
10
votes
4answers
3k views

Why can’t one be “trepid”?

Why can someone be intrepid but not trepid ? The Free Dictionary and Merriam-Webster both consider trepid to be a real word, but my computer’s little spell-checker program does not recognize it as ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What alternatives are there to 'de-facto?'

I'm looking to describe something that people use for no particular reason, other than that other people use it. It is popular because it is popular. De-facto seemed like a good fit at first, but my ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Genitive case or noun as adjective

Is there any rule for when it is better to use genitive case or noun as adjective? I'm not sure if there is any difference in meaning in this example: The department of accounting The ...
-2
votes
4answers
2k views

What's the opposite of “envious”? [closed]

What's the opposite of envious? For instance, I felt X when I got accepted into MIT and my sister did not. Or, when you feel bad for being lucky, when someone else is not. By googling, I found ...