Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Adjectives that can used with certain nouns

Is there a limitation on the kind of adjectives that can be used with particular nouns? For example, can I use the adjective lovely to describe food in the following sentences? The food was ...
9
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3answers
28k views

Why do we say “by all means” when we mean “by any means”?

The common expression by all means seems to advocate the use of all means possible in order to accomplish a certain object, when in fact it expresses the use of any means to do it. I realize that all ...
8
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4answers
4k views

Is there a word akin to “hungry” or “thirsty” that implies a need to urinate?

Sometimes my brain (maybe because I'm not a native English speaker) tends to come up with logical extensions to common formats; in this case, more than once I caught myself thinking (not out loud, ...
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2answers
1k views

What are “faded eyes” like?

Does that mean pale eyes (color) or glazed eyes (energy) or sight-dimmed eyes(ability)? I have no idea. Just for your information, the wandmaker in the following citation is a very old man with pale ...
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1answer
2k views

Using short adjectives as adverbs, such as “easy” & “short”

I know that some adjectives (such as easy & short) can be used as adverbs in some situations, but when can this happen and what adjectives does this apply to? This definitely works: "He stopped ...
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3answers
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Turning 'free of charge' into a noun phrase

I am helping a PhD student who makes constant reference to an Internet application he is studying by using a string of noun phrases, specifically ...its ease of use, general applicability and ...
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8answers
31k views

X, Y, Z — horizontal, vertical and …?

When working in a 2D coordinate system you could say that X is the horizontal axis and Y is the vertical axis. Extending this to 3D, is there a similar word for the Z axis? (I'm aware of Width, ...
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13answers
8k views

Synonym for “focused”

I'm looking for a better adjective that means focused in the sense of "intense concentration" like an elite warrior in battle. I guess it doesn't even need the sense of having blinders on, more about ...
2
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3answers
703 views

'The' article before the word plural

I have seen the statements such as the following one in some literature: "In the book 'XYZ' the word 'House' is never used in the plural." To me the word 'THE' right before plural seems very ...
7
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2answers
2k views

Deriving nouns and adjectives from place names

When describing people we often use adjectives based on their place of origin. (I'm asking about people only for simplicity.) 1) She is American. 2) He is English. 3) They are Canadian. You can ...
2
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4answers
851 views

Putting “interested” before the noun

Why can’t words like interested and other similar past participles, which are adjectives, be placed before their noun? I was taught an adjective can be placed before noun to describe it. When asked, ...
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8answers
5k views

Real word for “equippable”

Equippable, while not a really a word, seems to be accepted by the gaming community as a term for this can be equipped. Is there a more appropriate word which is real, singular and essentially means ...
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1answer
8k views

Difference between “mad” and “angry” [closed]

Are there any differences between mad and angry and when should you use one instead of the other?
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6answers
1k views

Is 'low speed' finally proving its merit?

Technically, you should expect the term low speed, not slow speed (which is obviously illogical). However, it seems the two phrases co-existed as long as one can look back: with low speed fighting ...
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1answer
136 views

Best meaning for “edit link” [closed]

"Edit link" has two possible meanings: A link to edit (page) To edit the link How can I know which one is correct? This is part of a translation project and I can't find context of the ...
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4answers
521 views

Can we use “use unfriendly” as an adjective?

I was wondering according to American English if this is a valid grammatical sentence: This item is a little use unfriendly. It sounds ok but I was wondering if "use unfriendly" (I mean without ...
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3answers
6k views

Difference between “unlikeable” and “dislikeable”?

Is there a difference between unlikeable and dislikeable? It feels like there is, but I'm uncertain how to explain it.
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1answer
586 views

Adjective to replace “small” in “small part” [closed]

I am looking for the replacement for the adjective "small" as in "small part", e.g: I am dedicating the small part of my article to.... which would not over-emphasize the fact of being small, ...
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4answers
4k views

Need to clarify use of “its” and “their”

I am having a debate at work regarding the correct choice: No investor has ever lost its capital. or No investor has ever lost their capital. It seems to sound awkward to say "its capital" ...
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1answer
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How do I abbreviate “little” correctly?

As I understand it, apostrophes are used to show where a letter/letters are missing (e.g. shouldn't-> should not, hadn't-> had not). So when I abbreviate "little", is it correct to write: li'l' ...
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7answers
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Word to describe something that focusses so ostentatiously on its purpose that it fails to achieve its goal

For example, if I go and see a movie that I perceive to have placed so much effort on the artistic merit of the acting and cleverness of the storyline that it is difficult to call it a success as a ...
5
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2answers
577 views

What is the best way to convert “tongue-in-cheek” into an adverb?

I was thinking something like "tongue-in-cheekly" but it sounds awkward. Of course, alternatives are welcome, but I couldn't come up with one that conveyed the half-serious playfulness that I ...
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4answers
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“Younger” or “youngest”

I came across an odd-looking usage in the paper today... The wife of President Assad listens to her husband yesterday with her two younger children The sentence suggests that she has some other ...
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3answers
10k views

Use of comma separating two adjectives

If I had the phrase two blond haired, blue eyed people would the comma be out of place? should I hyphenate "blond haired" and "blue eyed"?
4
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1answer
221 views

Can “few” be used as a substantive?

I feel doubts regarding the usage of few as a substantive. The sentence is: "Both kinds of literature are the product of the academic few." Is this correct? Now I want to place the adjective ...
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4answers
5k views

What's the distinction between “nonessential” and “inessential”?

I'm revising a text that uses the word "nonessential", but my ear is telling me "inessential." Usually when there are two very similar words like this, there is some subtle (or not so subtle) ...
3
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2answers
673 views

What part of speech is “atom” in “hydrogen atom”?

What is the type (adjective, noun, etc.) of the word atom in hydrogen atom? I think that atom here does not qualify hydrogen in any way and we can use it or not, and the meaning of the word hydrogen ...
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2answers
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Are “commentable” and “categorizable” proper?

Can I say "commentable and categorizable"? If not, what are some one word alternatives to use, to say that something can be commented on or categorized? I would like to use the words for database ...
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3answers
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newly graduate or new graduate

Which one is correct? I am a new graduate and have been teaching German for a few weeks now. I am a newly graduate and ... I can't decide whether to use "new" or "newly".
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2answers
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Why doesn't the prefix “in” in “invaluable” mean “un-” as in other adjectives? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Where did prefix exceptions originate? efficient accessible consistent articulate considerate conceivable convenient   inefficient inaccessible inconsistent ...
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3answers
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Would the adjectival form of “on the premises” be on-premise, on premise, or on-premises?

I am familiar with the origin of the word premises as it relates to property, both land and structure (relayed here: Is "premises" always plural?). I want to know if there is an accpetable ...
2
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4answers
5k views

Is “uncollaborative” a word?

I am describing a process as being antithetical to collaboration. To clarify, I'm referring to its quality as being "not naturally collaborative", not "actively anti-collaboration" Is "...
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5answers
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Does “smug” imply anything about correctness?

My local dictionary supplies this definition: having or showing an excessive pride in oneself or one's achievements I was recently told by someone that, "It is only 'smug' if it isn't literally ...
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5answers
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Is the word “granular” a synonym for the word “specific”?

I often hear the words "granular" or "granularity" being used around colleagues at my office to specify level of detail. For example: Does the running category have to be more granular? We ...
8
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1answer
837 views

What are the rules for the use of words that have a variant ending in -al? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it “geometric” but “theoretical”? “Electric” vs. “electrical” I think I'm clear on the difference between word pairs ...
2
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7answers
765 views

Add more adjectives to “[noun] is both [adjective] and [adjective]” structure [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Equivalent of “both” when referring three or more items? Consider this statement: Salads are both tasty and delicious. Is there a natural way to use that ...
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3answers
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How to describe someone who doesn't listen well [closed]

How would you describe someone who doesn't listen well? I don't mean someone who has hearing problems. I mean someone who doesn't finish listening and starts interrupting the conversation.
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5answers
522 views

Adjective for the likes of someone who consistently has a hard time finishing what s/he has started?

What adjective would you suggest for the like of someone who consistently has a hard time finishing what s/he has started? I thought of the word "distracted", but I don't feel it's sufficient to ...
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4answers
1k views

What adjective would you use to describe someone who uses the right vocab consistently?

I thought of precise, but not entirely sure even after checking a dictionary. Would you think it is the best choice?
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2answers
450 views

Compound adjective “free-molecule” vs. “free molecular”

I've been asked by a reviewer to change all occurrences of "free-molecule", which I use consistently throughout my manuscript, to "free-molecular". Typical usage examples: "particles colliding in the ...
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3answers
922 views

Adjective describing possession by someone else

Is there any adjective in English that would describe a quality of belonging or being in the possession of someone else who is not the speaker? In short, what adjective would you substitute for the ...
8
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2answers
4k views

What do you call moving a word to change a sentence's meaning?

Prosodic stress is stressing different words to change meaning: I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.) I didn't take the test ...
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4answers
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What adjective would best describe this difference between two doctrinal stances?

What adjective would be suitable here to describe this particular difference between two doctrinal stances? ... Well, as the matter of fact, neither "Mormons" nor "Jehovah's witnesses" are ...
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4answers
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What part of speech would “color” be in, “Mercury is the color red”? [closed]

Mercury is red. Mercury is the color red. Red is describing Mercury. What part of speech would color be?
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8answers
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“Experienced” vs. “seasoned”

Are these two words interchangeable? According to the Oxford dictionary, experienced means having knowledge or skill in a particular job or activity, while seasoned having a lot of experience in a ...
4
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4answers
696 views

Is “nuancedly” an existing word?

I was typing the following sentence in Microsoft Word: This theme is outlined more nuancedly in this novel. but it marked the word "nuancedly" as being non-existent. I did a search on Google ...
2
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4answers
2k views

What is the adjective for the attitude displayed in this situation?

I'll describe a situation that might sound random and sudden, but I'm sure we keep seeing now and then; I'd like to know if there's any suitable adjective that you can think of. 'Oily' and 'smarmy' ...
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7answers
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Use of the word “referable”

Can the word "referable" be used to denote something that can be referenced and what is the difference between "referable" and "referenceable"?
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2answers
744 views

Original use of kosher in the English lanuage

Recently I saw a post on the meta.rpg.se site that asked When is editing your answer not kosher?, and it got me thinking. Why is the word Kosher used, instead of, for example, Halal, Permissible, or ...
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11answers
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Single word for people who are like “a frog in the well”

Is there a single word describing someone who is like a frog in a well? The frog believes the well is the entire world. How can I describe people who think that their own small environment is the ...