Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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2
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2answers
67 views

The quality of things you stick with

I was wondering if there is a word in English to describe the quality of things we stick with. For example, if a training is well designed, people will tend to keep using it. Meanwhile, if it's not, ...
2
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5answers
151 views

The best word to describe “not easy to fall”

Based on my research, I have several options (all of them come with problem). Stable (I don't want to have 'resist to change' meaning) Firm (I don't want to have 'resist to change' & 'standing ...
-2
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2answers
212 views

Adjective which means both “Specific” and “General” simultaneously [closed]

I need an adjective which means both "Specific" and "General" simultaneously! As the explanation, the "adjective" is supposed to be used in scientific domain. The adjective would describes a ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

Comma between adjectives in title of thesis

Is there a comma missing in "A Heuristic for Capacitated Hierarchical Resource Location Problems"? It is a title of a bachelor's thesis. I'm not a native speaker, but I think there should be a comma ...
2
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3answers
186 views

An Idiom/phrase/adjective for an imaginary place where everything is perfect [closed]

A place where unrealistic and impossible things can happen. Is there an idiom/expression/phrase that connotes to such a stretch of the imagination?
0
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1answer
51 views

Permutation as an adjective?

"My studies showcase special emphasis on cumulative recursive [permutative?] effects of one's hydration, nutrition, self-image, and general cognitive ability." Basically, each of the four items ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

'Accessory' vs 'included' as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word 'accessory' as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like 'This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones'? I feel that 'This DJ ...
0
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2answers
47 views

Non in front of hyphenated adjective

If one wishes to add "non" in front of a hyphenated adjective, should one add a hyphen after "non?"
3
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3answers
117 views

Sound distortion from microphone or amplifier etc. - what do we call it?

I live near a temple and during the morning prayer, more often than not, the loudspeaker would produce a jarring sound. Is there a single word for the sound distortion from micrphone or amplifier. ...
11
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18answers
2k views

I am looking for an adjective, similar to “holding a grudge”

I am looking for an adjective that describes a person who is not willing to forgive or excuse someone's faults or wrong-doings from the past (other than "unforgiving"). For the ones who speak German, ...
0
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2answers
98 views

My as an adjective, posessive pronoun, or prepositional phrase?

During English class, we have been diagramming sentences, as described at http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/, and have had some confusion as to whether the term "my" should be considered an adjective, ...
0
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0answers
78 views

Changing a person's name into an adjective

What do you call it when a person's name or group's name is changed into a adjective? Is it "conversion" or "functional shift"? For instance, saying a band's music is "Beatlesque" or that someone's ...
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votes
2answers
70 views

a word that is commonly used as either an adjective or a noun [closed]

I'm trying to come up with some sort of play on word, but for that I need a common word that can be used as either a noun or an adjective. here is what I am trying to write: you are a little [word] ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate? [closed]

Imagine that adverbs were banned from the English language, and we had to replace them all with their cognate adjectives. Language would begin to sound bad to our ears that are attuned to the ...
0
votes
1answer
122 views

Adjective form of “advocate”?

What's a good adjective that means something similar to "advocate"? For instance, "He is an advocate. He's _____." Proactive and practical are not quite the right sense -- proactive ignores the ...
3
votes
5answers
240 views

Like “responsible” but for things or activities

It's perfectly correct to say I'm a responsible employee. However, what adjective should I use for non-living things or activities to convey the same meaning? The work is "responsible". ...
2
votes
3answers
324 views

What are words like “excellent, good, great, perfect” called?

Is there a specific term for these kinds of words that describe the quality of a particular act or object? Besides adjective? Examples: Perfect Excellent Great Good Bad Poor Terrible Horrible
6
votes
9answers
3k views

Opposite of “mutually exclusive”

The best I can think of is "necessarily accompanying", but it sounds awkward. Most answers I looked up give words like "concordant" and "accompanying", but these words have more passive definitions ...
11
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2answers
1k views

What do we call a doctor's prediction

Say my doctor tells me that my grandfather has only a few months to live. What do we call such a prediction based on a medical condition?
21
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6answers
2k views

What would you call a pleading before a judge or God [closed]

Is there a noun or adjective for the following or similar: a pleading before a judge for clemency a prayer before God begging for mercy Is there a better word than "begging", "pleading", ...
2
votes
1answer
625 views

“Unauthentic” vs. “inauthentic” [closed]

Is there really no difference between inauthentic and unauthentic? If there is, which is more correct?
4
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5answers
164 views

What adjective is/will be used to describe the scope of all things within a solar system?

For example: when we look up news stories online, or tune in on TV, we are being given news reports that fall within a spacial scope. Local news: City and surrounding county. Regional news: "Pacific ...
4
votes
2answers
178 views

Adjectives to describe a big human achievement vs. a quick achievement

Premise: It took 13 years and 3 billion dollars to sequence the first human genome by scientists. What would be an adjective to describe this feat? However, now a new software can do the ...
1
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2answers
109 views

Transforming words as in CAE tests (Cambridge Advanced English)

I am doing a Cambridge Advanced English test this weekend. The free online test they provide online lets you transform words like this, from nouns to verbs to adjectives, back and forth. • Come ...
3
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2answers
97 views

How are compound adjectives nominalised?

There are compound adjectives in which each word is inflected (as adjective). When they are nominalised, should each adjective be separately nominalised or only the ultimate word? The concrete ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

When do words like “Rewirable” keep the 'e' from “Rewire”?

I was spelling "rewirable" earlier and could've sworn it should be spelled 'rewireable' but google said otherwise. Whats the deal here? I never paid a lot of attention in my english classes ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?

I've been trying to figure out if this slogan requires a comma: Simple, streaming music. versus Simple streaming music I did some reading on comma rules here and here, but I'm still a bit ...
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2answers
43 views

An appropriate adjective [closed]

I am writing a report and it should tell all the stakeholders that "the target for all product categories, including Over Payments to customers has either been met or exceeded (by a very small ...
0
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0answers
38 views

alternative to “high depth”, “large depth”

After having used "high depth" in a report, I consider it now almost as an oxymoron. But, is "large depth" better English? What would be an alternative adjective? (I'm not looking for the abyss as I ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

An adjective for gestalt

Is there an adjective to describe someone with the ability to quickly grasp/see the whole picture out of a few perceived details. This person is not detail-oriented and never fails to see the forest ...
0
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5answers
86 views

What kind of character does a person who makes loud exclamations have?

Here, I am trying to find an adjective to describe a (relatively poor) person who is open but attracts a lot of attention (not attention-seeking though). As an example, I found this video: ...
1
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1answer
32 views

Should it be written due date or date due?

Is it better to write: Please pay by due date or Please pay by date due?
0
votes
1answer
91 views

What comes first—verb or adverb? [duplicate]

Do you say, to effectively communicate or would you say to communicate effectively. As ENL learner I get this confused quite often. Thanks.
2
votes
3answers
86 views

I can make it, I will leave. What's the precedence and ambiguity?

Here's a scenario. I am confounded when after a discussion with a friend, they arrive at my place on Saturday, here's the transcript. her: I can make it on Saturday. me: Ok, see you then anytime! ...
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0answers
47 views

“Programatically” v.s. “Pragmatically” [closed]

Whenever I need to express the fact that I need to express some process in terms of code, I generally use the word pragmatic. For example: How can I extract the markdown tags that a website uses ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

adjectives and past participles used as nouns [duplicate]

In general, 'the + adjective' and 'the + past participle' could be used instead of a plural noun phrase. The good die young. The damned will bury the dead. I think in certain cases that ...
0
votes
4answers
102 views

A proper substitute to “highly reactive” [closed]

I have to use the expression " highly reactive" a lot in my everyday writings. Can there be another word or phrase to put it better and which still connotes the correct meaning. Plutonium is a ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

when differences stand in the way of further contact

What is a good adjective for differences when they stand in the way of people continuing seeing each other? in a sentence: "The differences are to '[adjective]' for them to continue to meet." or ...
2
votes
1answer
122 views

Adjectives that Imply Nouns [closed]

Often we may see adjectives with nouns that are implied, but not explicitly written. I see this mostly with sports team names and demonyms. For example: The Notre Dame Fighting Irish Is "Irish" a ...
1
vote
3answers
168 views

Reducing multiple “enoughs” as in a sentence

Writing "enough" three times in such a short sentence seems too repetitive. So is there a different or more succinct way to write it? Horrible example sentence: I am drunk enough, fast enough and ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

What is the meaning of “primarian”?

I'm translating an interview of two musicians. At certain moment, discussing jokes hidden in lyrics, one of the speakers says "I think there's always been a couple of jokes in my work. It's not a ...
0
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0answers
77 views

“Oxford” comma with adjectives

Suppose you have some coordinate adjectives modifying a noun. E.g. "the cold, tired, hungry dog." You could rewrite this as "the cold and tired and hungry dog" but would these "the ...
1
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6answers
265 views

A word for not wanting to talk much

What is a word for when someone speaks or answers you using single words like "yes", "okay", or "probably", but your questions are sensible enough to base a conversation on?
0
votes
1answer
61 views

you’re more than due a vacation - due without for?

I do not understand how this sentence makes sense: you’re more than due a vacation Should it not be "due for"? If not, why? What dictionary entry (e.g. Oxford) would that be?
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Meaning of “drawn by hunger and pride” when describing a face

When Rayber had first opened the door in the middle of the night and had seen Tarwater's face - white, drawn by some unfathomable hunger and pride - he had remained for an instant frozen before ...
15
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16answers
4k views

What do you call an individual who tolerates criticism?

Is there an English word to refer to someone who tolerates (or welcomes, accepts) criticism given about them? Is there an adjective to use for such a person?
2
votes
3answers
126 views

Term for numbers that have at least one non-zero significant digit after the decimal point?

So, a number that is nothing but fractions is "fractional". A number that has a whole number and a fraction is "mixed", if you want to call it that. And the portion after the decimal point is called ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
14
votes
16answers
4k views

English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?

I am looking for a word that means “a process that you keep doing, hoping that you will learn something useful, but which you actually never learn anything from”. I'm quite sure that there is an ...
1
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1answer
113 views

Why are some “-ist” suffixed words used as the adjective form over the more common “-istic”?

Generally speaking, for any kind of "-ism", the suffix "-ist" produces the noun form and "-istic" produces the adjective form. But there are some "-ist" suffixes that are acceptable or even more ...