Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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103 views

Order of adjectives in a sentence [closed]

I'm making a website that has search results, and I hide some of them I want to show the user that some are hidden Which one should I say? Showing first 25 results only or Showing 25 first ...
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1answer
59 views

Hyphenation of the suffix “like”

I am having trouble understanding the following: "the achievable rate of the optimal AF scheme performs close to the cut-set like bound obtained in this paper" I think that the word "like" (above) ...
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5answers
1k views

A word that means 'hateful but indispensable'

Is there a single adjective meaning 'hateful but indispensable' or something close? (Not "love-hate"). British or American would be OK.
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0answers
59 views

Part of speech of “that”?

In this sentence: Its shape resembles that of a kangaroo’s hind foot. What part of speech would that be?
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2answers
85 views

Non-aerodynamic meanings of 'vane'

I tried to look for other meanings of 'vane' not related to aerodynamics (weather vane, vane of a feather, etc), and I wasn't really successful. Oxforddictionaries.com gives an example of adjective as ...
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7answers
1k views

Is there any word available for an incident occurred and vanished in front of eyes?

I was confused, when one of my friends was writing his name on a lead from vapor of mouth: I saw his name for a few seconds and after that it automatically disappeared. So what can I call this ...
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2answers
82 views

What does Pedantic mean when used as an adjective [closed]

According to Dictionary.com, Pedantic can mean ostentatious in one's learning Ostentatious means to show off , to attract attention. The way I interpret it is that one is so focused on ...
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1answer
101 views

Can someone provide an explanation regarding the etymology of the adjective “hell-bent?”

It's etymology is given as: hell-bent, 1835, U.S., originally slang, from hell + bent How do the the words "hell + bent," when taken together, form the definition "determined to achieve ...
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1answer
194 views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
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1answer
74 views

Demonstrated through? [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "Excellent communication, organizational, and leadership skills demonstrated through various awards and volunteer activities."
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2answers
129 views

What is wrong with mixing “taller” and “tallest” like this?

Although the towers appear identical, the west tower is the tallest, standing 16 feet taller than the east tower. What might be wrong? Does it have to do with comparative and superlative degrees? ...
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4answers
87 views

Half doesn't or half don't? [duplicate]

What’s the right version of these two? Half of the students doesn’t bother to show up. Half of the students don’t bother to show up. Or are both right?
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1answer
57 views

Adjectives to describe a legal system that has a number of limitations

Im finding an adjective describing a judicial system that has many limitations like the system has lax regulations and sanctions are not harsh enough. Looking forward to your replies.
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2answers
289 views

What does “candid” mean besides being honest?

According to various unnamed dictionaries, candid means "being honest, telling the truth". However, when I googled the word, a lot of pictures of women in bikinis popped up! Can someone tell me why ...
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6answers
934 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
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3answers
122 views

Can “erudite” be used to describe things other than humans?

I have heard the adjective erudite in relation to humans, but I was inditing an essay and pondering whether I could implement it to describe a school. An erudite school. Is that permissible?
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3answers
797 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Cartesian”?

While working on an essay for my English class I included this sentence: The best solution is to take a page out of Cartesian theory and take a proven approach. However, my teacher corrected it ...
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1answer
55 views

Is a phrase 'your happy being' correct?

My friend asked me to the beach by a sentence; 'The beach is waiting for your happy being.' Is the sentence he used correct?
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1answer
112 views

Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending

Questions on the use of lesser have appeared on here before, but I was reading a book on grammar which states the following (I omitted parts to keep it brief, but I retained what I think are the ...
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1answer
51 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
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4answers
190 views

What is the difference between “graphic” and “graphical” as adjectives?

Are the two adjectives completely interchangeable, or is there a distinction between them? Does it matter which I choose?
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2answers
1k views

“More drunk” or “drunker”?

I am at a party. I drink wine till I'm drunk. Then I drink some more. So am I more drunk now, or drunker?
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2answers
459 views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
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2answers
91 views

“He is loved”, is 'loved' an adjective or a verb?

He is loved. This is something that I've always kind of wondered. In a sentence like this, is loved a verb or an adjective? Can it be considered either?
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1answer
69 views

Is a determiner considered an adjective or a separate part?

I came across some blogs which states that determiners are types of adjectives (according to traditional grammar), whereas wiki (which I do not entirely trust) indicates some key differences. after ...
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7answers
1k views

What is the word for something that is non-divisible?

I'm looking for a generic word, an adjective, that means non-divisible. Like the opposite of compound. I am looking for a word I can use in the context of programming, where you can have data types ...
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3answers
117 views

What is difference between “faulty” and “broken”?

I was working as an intern in Malaysia. Once day, my advisor asked me to check some electronic device. He said: "Can you check them for me if which one is faulty please separate it to another ...
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0answers
79 views

Can we use all “nouns” as adjective? [closed]

can we use "truth" or "thought" as adjective for example; "truth" nurturing is through imagination or "thought sun", thought grove" &...? This question body meets the quality of words ...
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1answer
149 views

“Kafkaesque” vs. “Kafkan”

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives Kafkaesque and Kafkan, or are they synonyms?
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4answers
162 views

Can we use “morning” to describe half a day? How to say half a day using an adjective?

I don't know how to use an adjective word to describe the same meaning of half a day. E.g. I have done all the work in the morning. In this sentence, "in the morning" means from 08:00 am to 11:59 am ...
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1answer
330 views

Do you “have a particular interest” or do you “have particular interest”?

Maybe it's particular (!) to the "particular" adjective. Without it, it's fairly obvious that I "have an interest" is more correct than "I have interest". But when my interest is particular, I'm not ...
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6answers
1k views

Using “decadent” to describe a building or town in neglect or ruin

I have often seen decadent used to refer to a non-physical state, like a person who is spiritually or morally decadent. Could decadent be applied to something physical like a building or a town to ...
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1answer
50 views

custom cutting lumber or custom cut lumber or custom lumber cutting

I know custom picking strawberry, to a certain extent, as I think ,is right. I have confirmed it in google. But here comes the problem: when I try to apply the same structure to "customers can cut the ...
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2answers
70 views

Is the term “fresh and original” redundant?

I see this phrase all over the place. Fresh in this usage appears to be in the usage: not previously known or used; new or different. And directly lists original as a synonym. And original in ...
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2answers
248 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
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1answer
76 views

What's the difference between saying 'the passage above' or 'the above passage'?

I'm a Korean High school student and I have a question regarding the use of adjectives. Is there a difference between saying '...the passage above' or '...the above passage?' I'm sure that both of ...
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3answers
3k views

Why “daily” and not “dayly”?

Checking how adjectives related to time are created, I see: year → yearly month → monthly week → weekly day → daily Why has “day” derivated into “daily” with an ‘i’ instead of “dayly” with a ‘y’? ...
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1answer
52 views

how can the word forlorn be used [closed]

How can the word forlorn be used in a sentence? i know it is an adjective but i hardly see it being used in a passage and really do not how to use it. How can it be used correctly in a sentence to ...
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2answers
150 views

How to describe humanities students in one word

In several languages, there is a specific, usually rather derogatory word for students of the humanities. Would it be necessary to stick to 'arts students' or 'humanities students' to point out these ...
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8answers
4k views

How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?

Perhaps I should make it clear: - He naturally attracts girls. - He doesn't chase girls and have no intention for any relationship. - You just see him often together with girls.
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4answers
228 views

One word that can be used to represent Weak student?

Is there a word/term in English that describes a student that has bad grades, weak performance... I am writing a PhD thesis so I need a word that can be understood by native and non-native English ...
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2answers
90 views

An adjective to describe the benefits associated with saving time

I'm looking for an adjective to replace 'time saving' in the following sentence: "...a range of immediate and tangible time-saving and economic benefits" I'm thinking it should be something like ...
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2answers
103 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
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1answer
47 views

Which noun does an Adjective associate with of

I read the Adjective Association question but I'm wondering how it applies to the following sentence: Here is a really old picture of me. It appears that really old, and picture are associated ...
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3answers
157 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
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6answers
98 views

Word for “not able to be escaped from by struggling”

What is the word that means "not able to be escaped from by struggling"? I heard it many years ago and have forgotten it due to advancing age and mis-spent youth.
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3answers
815 views

What's the difference between an adjective and a past participle?

I'm really confused about the object the doctor specialized will help you or the documents required How can I tell in the future, if I have to use the past participle or the adjective? And ...
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3answers
273 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
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1answer
425 views

What does “wishy-washy” mean?

Question: What does it mean when something is "wishy-washy"? Is it informal? Is it American English, British English or both?
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56 views

Flattering vs. flatter [closed]

Of two sentences You are flattering me. You flatter me. Which is correct? Are both correct, or is one better than the other?