Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Adjective for advice

In my native language, there is an adjective for "advice given without much consideration". To translate it literally in English it would be "void advice" or "dry advice". Meaning, the person giving ...
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3answers
58 views

An adjective for “in the wrong register”

I'm trying to fix this sentence: There's a lot of poor word and phrase choice that is either redundant, in the wrong register, or flatly ungrammatical. The problem is that the compound ...
4
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2answers
73 views

How would you describe the lava in a lava lamp?

I can only think of the word morphing but that is pretty boring and not exactly what I am looking for. I want to talk about the way that they seemingly levitate as it changes and absorbs itself while ...
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1answer
69 views

Why the adjective “vague” comes after the noun “change”?

In Longman dictionary there is an example for disingenuous which says "Keeping the details of the tax changes vague is disingenuous." the adjective vague precedes the verb is and follows the noun ...
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0answers
47 views

whatever way that S+V

Is it grammatically wrong to include the relative pronoun of "that" between 'whatever way' and 'you look at it' in the following phrase in BBC News. The citizens of Glasgow lose out whatever way that ...
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3answers
235 views

How can a pronoun “one” be a noun?

I asked a question some days ago about if an atributive-only adjective can be followed by a pronoun one, for example in this sentence When the Olympics began in 779 B.C. There were not a lot of ...
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2answers
63 views

the number of boys in the class is fewer than that of girls- correct or not? [duplicate]

The number of boys- countable or uncountable? I'm confused with this sir.
2
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1answer
185 views

Can an attributive adjective come before pronouns?

For example, the attributive adjective only and pronoun one: can we say "there is only one"?
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3answers
115 views

Difference between “difficult” and “hard” [closed]

According to Dictionary.com Difficult difficult [dif-i-kuhlt, -kuh lt] adjective not easily or readily done; requiring much labor, skill, or planning to be performed ...
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4answers
138 views

Euphemism for Poor Performance

I am looking for a euphemism to be used on a student evaluation form that relates to poor/unsatisfactory/unacceptable performance. I do not want to erode the self-esteem of a special needs audience. I ...
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2answers
71 views

When do we use “overwhelming”? [closed]

This word is rarely used in Russian. I only know that we can say "overwhelming majority". Could you explain the defition of this adjective giving some examples?
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2answers
61 views

Can we use the word “steady” to describe a person? [closed]

I know it's possible to say steady arms or steady decision. But what about people? I found in the student's book that this word is allowed to use when you describe personalities. Is it true? And ...
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1answer
46 views

Should nouns used as adjectives be in plural?

In Spanish, we say "Servicio de reservas" and in English we are in doubt about these options: Bookings Service Booking Service Booking Services The problem is that we think that the first one ...
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1answer
166 views

Why is it “noticeable” and not “noticable”?

Here's something weird. I made a typo today in an essay and got minus points for writing "noticable" rather than "noticeable". I thought you drop the vowel at the end of the verb when you add -able. ...
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2answers
36 views

Word for the blackness of charred wood, that emphasizes it comes from charring?

What is a word to describe the blackness of charred wood called with a word that emphasizes that it comes from charring? Of course it is technically usually identical to jet-black, but is there a ...
2
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0answers
47 views

What is the etymology of the word “basic” as used in current slang? [duplicate]

For those not familiar with the term, it is used mainly by teens and 20-somethings. The definition can be found at Urban Dictionary (look at definitions 1 and 3). Specifically, I am not talking ...
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1answer
41 views

Innovative vs Innovatory

I came accross the word innovatory today. Few terrorist tactics or targets are ever entirely original, but a combination of different elements can often be innovatory. [The Guardian] I checked ...
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2answers
34 views

“large field of view” vs “high field of view”

Which one is right between "large field of view" and "high field of view"?
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3answers
99 views

What adjective would you choose if you want to elevate a workaholic to a higher degree?

I want to refer a hard-working person something far more than referring him a mere "workaholic". What adjective should I choose with "workaholic", if I want to refer him as someone working even harder ...
2
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1answer
48 views

adjective-noun-adjective-noun

What is the correct punctuation of something like "constant factor competitive algorithm"? This is a term that frequently appears in computer science articles, and I have seen it written in multiple ...
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1answer
21 views

Business English: contracted forum?

I would like to know your opinions regarding the use of the term "contracted forum". The context is a long-term project for which steering committee meetings are being conducted. At one time, the ...
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1answer
70 views

The adjective “close” in a competitive situation

Oxford defines "close" thus: Adj (With reference to a competitive situation) won or likely to be won by only a small amount or distance: "the race will be a close contest" "she finished ...
2
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1answer
47 views

Which preposition to use with “unbecoming”?

It is easy when you say something becomes or unbecomes someone. In this case, no preposition is needed. It is another story when the verb turns into the adjective “(un)becoming”. I would like to ...
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0answers
71 views

How come we say “data set” instead of “datum set”?

Given that "data" is the plural form, and it's playing the role of an adjective here, how come we don't use the singular form? Other kinds of sets, for example "point set", "skill set", "stationery ...
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2answers
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Why “No smoking” works but “Yes smoking” doesn't?

No smoking is a formula used to indicate smoking is not allowed. Why can't we use Yes smoking to indicate smoking is allowed? (Although, we might use humorously but I've never heard actually.) ...
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3answers
53 views

What is a word for a mad or insane explanation? Something offered as an explanation that makes no sense at all? [closed]

I am looking for a word that designates something as crazy but does not imply a judgment.
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4answers
167 views

Word which means that a number has magnitude greater than one?

I am looking for a word which describes a number as having a magnitude greater than one. i.e. numbers such as 1.2, 100, 123456, -4, -1.01 Hopefully it should be usable in a sentence like this one: ...
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0answers
22 views

Should less be repeated to clarify it applies to a series?

For a sentence like this: That setting results in a less firm and stable surface. Is it clear that less applies to both firm and stable or should it be repeated to avoid ambiguity between the ...
3
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1answer
129 views

When may adjectives precede determiners? (E.g. too difficult a task)

The expression too difficult a task sounds a little pompous, but it doesn't sound ungrammatical. According to my folk-beliefs about English grammar, determiners precede adjectives. However, the ...
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0answers
56 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
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1answer
43 views

Organizational term meaning “order appearing in a book” as contrasted to chronological

Is there a word that means "in the order something appears in a book or document" as opposed to chronological meaning "the order something occurs in time." Ignoring the fact that my examples may not ...
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3answers
100 views

A word to mean escape from a dire situation involving death

When the Sobibór prisoners escaped they were in a dire situation. They could stay in the camp to face certain execution, or revolt. Risking revolt meant they might die, but there would be a slim ...
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1answer
51 views

What is the adjective for something that evokes claustrophobia?

Something that really bothers me is when people say something like "This place is really claustrophobic", when of course it is them who is claustrophobic, not the place. However, it bothers me more ...
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1answer
104 views

Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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6answers
254 views

Two-word adjective to describe a university life that has just started?

For objects you can say things like a brand-new car. For beliefs you can write a new-born Christian. What about periods in life like university life? Example: Emma has every reason to be happy. ...
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164 views

Irregular adjectives

Are there any other irregular adjectives except these ?
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1answer
85 views

Word that describes a clown who weakens an argument by taking a side

When there is more than one side in a debate, an argument can be weakened by someone who is seen as stupid or a joker if they are vocal about it. This invalidates your beliefs because if crazy person ...
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3answers
81 views

An adjective to describe someone who has a “good personality”? [closed]

I can't think of a word to describe someone with a good personality and who you can't think of a bad word to say about them. Samuel is such a ______ guy. You never hear a bad word said against ...
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3answers
180 views

Adjective that means “found in groups” but without implying a social behavior?

For example, jellyfish are usually found in groups. However, they are not "social animals", they just end up together because of the current of the sea (or other physical phenomena). What's an ...
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4answers
61 views

A word whose meaning is very close to dangerous

I am looking for an adjective to write "Anger is a ____ feeling" instead of "Anger can have dangerous consequences". Could you please help out?
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1answer
100 views

Difference between 'melancholic' and adjective 'melancholy'?

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives melancholy and melancholic? Can they be used interchangeably? The Oxford Learner's Dictionaries define them as follows: melancholy ...
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1answer
166 views

Can a person be “overly literal”

It's common to say someone is being overly literal if their interpretation of a phrase is too strictly literal either intentionally (nitpickers) or unintentionally (people learning another language). ...
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2answers
75 views

What is the correct adjective suffix form for tropism?

A tropism is a type of biological response where an organism reacts to a particular environmental stimulus. For instance, try searching for gravitropism or phototropism and you'll see what I mean. ...
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5answers
203 views

What is a noun for “one who is responsible”?

The word "responsible" works as an adjective only. What is a noun for a person who bears some responsibility (i.e. is accountable for something)? Note: Originally my question was longer, but the ...
4
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1answer
281 views

A word that describes someone who 'sees/brings out the good in others'?

The person doesn't have to be good themselves, but they can bring the good out of others. The word doesn't have to be an english word, I just want to know if such a word exists. Ex. Beauty with the ...
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15answers
2k views

Adjective for someone who doesn't react when someone insults them? [closed]

What's a good adjective to describe someone who doesn't react when someone does something immature or insults them?
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1answer
44 views

A word that implies 'unique' (on an object or act)

First time posting here, no idea if this is the right sort of question but I'll give the full background and let you decide. I play a game called DotA, in which there are items which modify the way ...
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3answers
97 views

“Potential,” “wanna-be”: what's an equivalent for “should-be”?

If "Ooze News could be a title for my website about slime molds," I can say: Ooze News is a potential title for my website about slime molds. If "Janet wants to be a pilot," I can say: Janet ...
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2answers
67 views

What is a better alternative to the word rickety?

My sentence is "The system was so badly designed that it has now become rickety. Even a minor change could cause the entire system to collapse". Rickety just doesn't seem to fit well.
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1answer
95 views

It was too tempting a chance to resist

One day, I came across this sentence: This chance was too tempting a chance to resist. Even though this sounded perfectly natural to me, as I tried to get the full meaning out of it, I ...