Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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15answers
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What adjective would subtly state that an argument is cheap, weak or insignificant?

I am writing to director operations of my company and want to state his secretary’s argument did not have a lot of weight. It, to us (a team of auditors), was insignificant. I am looking for an ...
8
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11answers
3k views

Her complexion was 'beautiful'?

I'm looking for an adjective which describes a complexion. I understand that the term complexion is primarily used to describe the color of someone's skin. However, I'm looking for a word which says ...
0
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2answers
108 views

Word for the person who only plans

What is the word for the person who only plans for something? Or the person only starts something and then forgets it or does not complete it.
2
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2answers
119 views

A word for “always looking for self-improvement”?

Is there a word which describes a person that is always looking for self-improvement (i.e. is aiming for perfection, never satisfied and is always looking for areas of improvement)? Thank you.
0
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2answers
104 views

new difficult question or difficult new question? [duplicate]

I want to know which one is correct ? "New" is age and "Difficult" is observation so it should be difficult new question but I think it's not ! why?
4
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8answers
750 views

Is there an adjective that can be used for “increased storage capacity”

If something becomes faster, we say this is an improvement in speed. If something becomes lighter, we say this is an improvement in weight (assuming that a low weight is desirable). If something ...
0
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2answers
452 views

Is there a word for a person who is not rich, but nevertheless acts as if he's wealthy in front of strangers?

My neighbor is just like that person, so, I think to write a poem on him and desire to break his self-forgetfulness by narrating his pride to him!
0
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1answer
48 views

Is there a word for an object which is utility based but beautiful?

Perhaps this is a bit too unspecific but, is there an adjective which describes something built for a mechanical or technical purpose rather than for beauty, yet has a pleasant aesthetic appearance ...
10
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3answers
271 views

Indefinite articles used with plural nouns: It was AN amazing TWO DAYS

The indefinite article a(n), derives from the old English word an meaning "one". Generally this word only occurs in determiner function before noun phrases which are singular. However, there seem to ...
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0answers
52 views

“Ventilated” brakes or “vented” brakes?

Automobile disc brakes with spacing or gaps separating the contact surfaces are commonly referred to as ventilated brakes. However, I've never heard the word "ventilated" outside of this context. ...
3
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8answers
1k views

What do you call someone who doesn't back down? [closed]

I'm looking for a word that describes a character in an essay I'm writing. I need a word for someone who doesn't back down, something like "brave" but not quite, more like "courageous". This person is ...
3
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2answers
161 views

What is the adjectival form of “Plato”? [closed]

What is the adjectival form of Plato? "Platonistic"? For example, in the following sentence: He made the Platonistic statement that there are truths, but there is also the Truth. Or is it ...
0
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1answer
47 views

OK to use “capstone” as an adjective?

The term "capstone project" is common. Google tells me there's also something called "Capstone Classroom." The dictionary -- whatever dictionary you might look in -- says "capstone" is only ever a ...
0
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0answers
49 views

How to use hyphen to form new adjectives?

Writing a chemistry paper I need to form an adjective for the following concept: TiO2 rich in oxygen vacancies. Is this the proper formation for an adjective intended to mean that?: ...
2
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1answer
66 views

What's the difference between these two sentences?

Health facilities reported 1000 people killed and 3000 wounded since March 19. Health facilities reported that 1000 people were killed and 3000 were wounded since March 19. Isn't 'killed' ...
3
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8answers
626 views

A word to describe the opposite of distant people?

What's an accurate adjective or word to describe people who are not necessarily friendly, approachable or agreeable, but they come across as very genuine, cheerful and energetic, and that even though ...
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1answer
82 views

What is the difference between 'Aggressive' and 'Agressiveness'? They are both adjectives in the dictionary [closed]

'Aggressive' and 'Aggressiveness' are both listed as adjectives in the dictionary, which in my mind implies that they have the same linguistic function (is this a correct assumption?). However, I ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Is there a single word to denote “arguments on words, word meanings, and their registers”

I often get into arguments with my colleagues on the difference between formal and informal words. Example: He was felicitated on bagging the first prize. I tried to explain to my colleagues ...
2
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2answers
62 views

How would we classify the phrase “worn out?”

How would we classify the phrase "worn out?" I know it can belong to the verb figure of speech, but here I'm interested in the usage where it seems to function as an adjective. He put on his worn ...
1
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0answers
22 views

Article before “two” with intervening adjective?

Consider the following sentence: (1) The project will include Alice, Bob, and an expected two new hires. This sounds correct to me; it means we are expecting to hire two new people and will put ...
2
votes
3answers
173 views

Word or Phrase that means “a person who disregards their life while rescuing people in danger”

Suppose a person saves the life of others without giving any thought that it could be dangerous, harmful, or life-threatening to himself. He doesn't care that this endeavour might harm, injure, or ...
1
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1answer
115 views

Is there a word for a person who's obsessed with lights?

I need to know if there exists a word for a person who's obsessed with lights. The formation lights make etc.
3
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2answers
46 views

Do I use a comma between “whimsical” and “clay” in the sentence below? [duplicate]

Billy did a wonderful job creating his whimsical[,] clay fish dish.
0
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1answer
32 views

When to use addicting vs. addictive?

We're having a debate in the kitchen about this. When would I use addicting vs addictive?
1
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3answers
116 views

Motive, Motivative, or Motivating?

What is the most fitting adjective to describe '(something) that motivates' among motive, motivative, and motivating? EDIT: Reading from the answers that 'motive' is not an adjective, actually I put ...
5
votes
3answers
99 views

Is a dark polka dot necktie dark?

In The Syntactic Phenomena of English, McCawley considers the phrase "a dark blue necktie", and concludes that "blue" in that phrase is simultaneously a noun and an adjective. It modifies the noun ...
4
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2answers
66 views

Is `bonny' neutral register?

Dictionary definitions of `bonny' admit to chiefly British (or even Scots), but give no further hint of the possible tinges of this word. Bonny (adj.) means attractive, fair; fine, excellent [M-W]. ...
1
vote
5answers
125 views

Is there an adjective to describe someone who feels the desire to run away from situations?

I'm looking for a word that could be used to describe a person in this way. E.g. "I'm feeling very ____ today"
1
vote
5answers
286 views

What's a word that describes acting coldly to hide the fact that you are hurt?

Someone who acts cold and impassive to mask the fact that they are actually hurt. I've been trying to come up with the word for hours, but came up with nothing.
1
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1answer
97 views

What's the origin/etymology of the phrase “regular old”? Does it have a clearly defined meaning?

It seems to me that the adjective phrase "regular old" seems to have a few distinct usages, but a confusing conversation and some fruitless searches as to a specific definition have me coming to ...
3
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7answers
346 views

Word for someone with the ability to change appearances

What's a word for someone having the ability to change their own or someone else's appearance? I've heard witch, pythoness, shapeshifter and siren, but any other words I'm missing?
3
votes
1answer
109 views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Directions for comma use between adjectives as per various sources

I read a lot about when comma should be used between a list of adjectives modifying a noun that follows. There are a lotSo much so that now it all looks like a jumble of which adjectives sound better ...
0
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3answers
394 views

“more than usual” vs. “more than usually”

Which sentence is correct? "I had more customers than usual." "I had more customers than usually." "More than usual" sounds pretty common, but "more than usually" seems more correct when I think ...
4
votes
4answers
191 views

Adjective for someone that tries to gloss over past insults?

This person would say things that wound you and then after an hour she comes to you all smiley and tries to make up for the things she said. Not in a serious manner but really lightheartedly, saying ...
2
votes
1answer
114 views

Is there a term for adjectives that don't, at face value, seem to apply to the noun modified?

There's a verse in Bob Seger's song Mainstreet that has this wonderful little seemingly-nonsensical word pairing: There was this long, lovely dancer in a little club downtown; I loved to watch ...
0
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5answers
100 views

Is there a word for someone/group of people that intentionally ignore an issue caused by them?

I'm looking for a word/phrase similar to 'turning a blind eye' to describe someone/a group of people who intentionally ignore a problem caused by them because it's easier to ignore it than deal with ...
1
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2answers
120 views

What part of speech is 'closer' functioning as in 'I moved closer'?

'I moved closer.' At face value, 'closer' seems to be acting like an adjective; however, I don't see anything in the sentence to which it can refer. A friend suggested that 'to move closer', 'to ...
2
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4answers
77 views

Same adjective for two nouns

The government placed restrictions on both diesel fuel and diesel engines. Here I dont want to repeat the diesel. I cannot write: The government placed restrictions on both diesel fuel and ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Is there a collateral adjective for 'game'?

I was looking for an adjective that would describe anything game-like that is either taken directly from Ancient Greek or Latin. 'Ludic' comes to mind, but it came to assume the same connotations as ...
8
votes
1answer
161 views

Why isn't USA an attributive adjective, (but US is)?

When referring to the country, both US and USA (among other forms), are acceptable. But when used as an adjective, USA sounds wrong. US Army, but not USA Army. Even in the expanded form (for ...
0
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1answer
79 views

“to-know-each-other” or “knowing-each-other”

We gave the new members a to-know-each-other break. We gave the new members a knowing-each-other break. What it means is: the boy came back to the break that was scheduled so that guests had ...
4
votes
4answers
140 views

What is the correct way to use an intensifier followed by an adjective and then a plural noun? I am specifically interested in the intensifier, “too”

Example: You should not place too high expectations on your children. Using the phrase, "such high expectations"seems to change the meaning slightly. I´m familiar with the construction too+ adj.+ a+ ...
0
votes
3answers
192 views

What's the appropriate word for someone that's leaving something?

What's the most appropriate word for someone that's leaving something (or somewhere)? For example, if someone leaves an association permanently, what do I call him? The term will be used in a ...
0
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2answers
56 views

Use of noun vs. adjective in store signs [closed]

I saw the following on a store sign in a foreign country. EXCELLENCE IN HAND DRIP COFFEE Isn't it better to use adjective as in EXCELLENT HAND DRIP COFFEE ?
1
vote
1answer
66 views

What is the difference (if any) between common interests and interests in common?

Is there any difference between "common interests" and "interests in common"? One can certainly ask: "Do you have any interests in common?" Can you also ask: "Do you, guys, have any ...
0
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6answers
180 views

Is there a word for the opposite of being hollow?

I'm looking for an adjective that describes an object that, rather than is just the outside, is instead just the inside. Searching for antonyms of hollow, I have only found the word solid, which ...
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2answers
76 views

Adjective/ Collocation with 'Caution:' — Why does 'huge' sound odd?

Simon Johnson, Scottish Political Editor, The Telegraph UK, 11:08PM BST 07 May 2015: Nicola Sturgeon: I'm treating exit poll with huge caution Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: “I’d treat the exit poll ...
5
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3answers
151 views

What adjective would you use for “not readable color”?

Imagine you received an email, which looks like this: I guess there's an adjective to express that either the background or the font color should be changed, because it's really hard to read. My ...
1
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3answers
2k views

Is integratable a correct adjective for 'capable of integration'?

I'm looking for an adjective that captures the meaning of 'capable of integration' in a systems/software context (so not integrable in mathematical context). Integratable seems to be somewhat in use, ...