Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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5answers
150 views

desired vs. desirable [closed]

I have written a paper and the reviewer said me that I must change "a more desired solution" to "a more desirable solution". I am not sure about the differences. I have also some similar usages of ...
4
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5answers
253 views

Adjective for someone who is really good at cooking or baking and/or bakes frequently

So and so is the most "bakiest" person I know! She's so good at baking! What word could feasibly replace "bakiest" which I obviously made up. :)
4
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10answers
747 views

Is there an adjective for “cannot be defended against”?

The adjective indefensible is commonly used to describe something that cannot be defended, but it applies to the defender, not to the attack itself. I'm wondering if there's a reasonably neutral word ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Usage of “prevalent” in reference to a disease [closed]

Is it ok to use word 'prevalent' in the following sentence: Flu is very prevalent in the third world countries, that nobody cares about it.
0
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0answers
46 views

A question to ask about birth rank or serial number [duplicate]

Are you the third of your parents' children? or the second issue? Or, you are the third guy, eh? What is the question for which "he came third in the race" is an answer?. Instead of resorting to ...
2
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1answer
88 views

What do you call the side of a building that is neither the near side nor the far side?

What do you call the side of a building that is neither the near side nor the far side? A friend suggested adjacent. I think that fits, but is there a way to distinguish between adjacent faces of a ...
3
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1answer
157 views

“Shakespearean English” - What English or American writers have adjectives coined after their names?

Shake·spear·ean - adjective \shāk-ˈspir-ē-ən: of or relating to William Shakespeare or his writings. Almost every English speaking person has heard or read something about Shakespearean English. ...
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2answers
100 views

A word to describe someone or something that is not last?

I'm looking for a word that describes the state of not being last. A word that would apply to everything in an ordered list that is not the last thing in that list. From I wasn't the last person ...
3
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2answers
102 views

Adjectival form of “consult”, “consultation” – Translation for the German word “konsiliarisch”

The word konsiliarisch is used, for instance, in hospitals when a doctor sends his patient to another branch or medical specialty for some specific examination. You will later return to your actual ...
1
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1answer
81 views

How to translate these kind of phrases?

I am confused in translating some kind of phrases such as below : Which one of the pairs is true? If both, What is the difference? and what is the meaning of the phrase? (I mean if I want to explain ...
0
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1answer
19 views

the usage of “insalubrious”

Does it make sense to say an insalubrious relationship between two countries? If not, what would be a better replacement? hey this is my first post on this website.. I'm a non-native english ...
0
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4answers
110 views

Expression for 'One who likes expensive stuff, luxuries, but lacks appreciation?'

What would be an expression for: Someone who wants expensive stuff; someone who wants luxuries, and who lacks in appreciation.
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5answers
145 views

Expression for 'One who cares about one's social rank'

What is a word or expression for someone who cares about what social rank they're in. Someone who wants to have money, something similar to ambitious? Vain is not the word I'm looking for.
0
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1answer
40 views

Adjective form of “degrade”?

For example, I want to say: This book degrades Western culture. In this form: This book has been described as ??? to Western culture. What would the adjective form be? Is "degradeful" a ...
0
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3answers
60 views

Is “willfully disingenuous” a tautologism?

It seems to me that definitions of disingenuous such as the following might imply willfulness: adjective lacking in frankness, candour, or sincerity; falsely or hypocritically ingenuous; ...
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4answers
52 views

Is it right to call a job which has begun to bore you a “plain” job?

What is the best english adjective to identify a job in which you always do the same things over and over and so eventually get bored from it? I read somewhere the sentence "I have a plain job", "I ...
8
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9answers
709 views

What exists between tolerant and enthusiastic?

The use of tolerance comes with varying degrees of indifference to something, with often unstated or deliberately understated degrees of disapproval for that thing. For example, "While I'm tolerant of ...
0
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1answer
101 views

“Unavailable” vs. “not available” [duplicate]

What is the difference between unavailable and not available? In my opinion, unavailable is something that will never be available, while not available is something that is not available right now ...
13
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4answers
3k views

Proper term for knowing four or more languages?

If bilingual means you know two languages, and trilingual means you know three, what would be the proper term for knowing four, five or even six languages?
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2answers
145 views

“I am a legend” vs. “I am legend”

Which sentence makes sense, the first or the second? I am      legend. I am  a  legend.
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1answer
55 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
1
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1answer
51 views

How to say that something doesn't take a lot of memory [closed]

I'm working in small marketing company, and we got a task to promote mobile app, we usually work only with our native language which is Bulgarian, but the client insisted to translate promo text on ...
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2answers
179 views

Can something be *slightly* critical? [duplicate]

I overheard someone at work describing a task as "quite critical", and then describe another task as (direct quote) "über critical". Forgetting for a minute the colloquial nature of the conversation, ...
0
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1answer
52 views

“Curious to learn” vs. “curious to learning”

I know that in case of "looking forward to" I have to use the gerund form. So e.g. I am looking forward to hearing from you. Now I am not sure about this sentence: I am always curious to ...
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1answer
56 views

Adjective and Noun Placement

Is it better to say "We rescued the five people trapped" or "We rescued the five trapped people"? And why?
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2answers
79 views

What's a word to describe black humor of the variety that criticizes the injustices of the world?

For example, let's say I see a homeless man and woman eating scraps of food next to a garbage fire to keep warm and I say to my friend, "Must be date night" (with undertones of "This is a sad world"). ...
9
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3answers
641 views

Connotations of “quixotic”

Would you say quixotic has more of a positive connotation or more of a negative connotation? The definition for quixotic given by Merriam-Webster is: hopeful or romantic in a way that is not ...
2
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1answer
87 views

When to use more or -er [duplicate]

Is there a rule as to when I use "more" in a sentence or "-er"? For example, "I think it would be more fun/funner if we stayed home tonight." I know the correct usage in this sentence but is there a ...
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3answers
109 views

Is there an adjective to describe someone who has access to all the facts, news or insider information?

Looking for an adjective to fill in the blank below: I was talking to my stock broker. I wanted to say: I am not as _ as you who has access to all the facts, news and insider information (about the ...
0
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2answers
117 views

Unforgettable or Memorable?

I was writing a thank you letter to someone I had good time with. I was fighting between two adjectives to describe the experience. These are: 1. unforgettable, 2. memorable. The questions that I was ...
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2answers
63 views

“Cheat legal” - grammatically correct?

The slogan Cheat legal! used by the Australian company SKINS has bugged me every since I saw their advertisement on TV. Only recently, I realized that there is a chance that it may actually be ...
0
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2answers
88 views

What does “in-flight” mean in this context?

Below is the context. Do we need to create a table to catch any in-flight data during the cut-over? I looked the word in-flight up in several dictionaries and almost all of them state the ...
0
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3answers
126 views

“Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes” [duplicate]

I've heard many people say "big black eyes," and I'm curious whether or not we must put an and in-between big and black. To me, since big and black are describing eyes, it is necessary to put an and ...
2
votes
3answers
252 views

What is the right description of the word “squeaky” in “squeaky clean”?

Is squeaky in "squeaky clean" an onomatopoeia? Is there a right word to describe this word, other than simply an "adjective"? It's something that uses the description of a sound as an adjective. ...
2
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1answer
235 views

What is the difference between “super” and “superb”?

I have seen usage of both super and superb. I also searched for meaning of these two words and found they are almost identical. Example sentences - She is a super girl. His performance in the last ...
2
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3answers
164 views

When does one append “-ly”?

I am trying to understand the difference between adjectives that end in ‑ly compared with adjectives that do not end end in ‑ly. For example (the ones I would have chosen are bold): A tactical ...
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2answers
115 views

A common word for something Simple yet Powerful [closed]

As the title says: what is a common word for something simple yet powerful?
2
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1answer
460 views

Adjective to describe a person who is easy to work with. [closed]

What singular word can be used, to describe a person who is "easy to work with?"
2
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1answer
59 views

“exact soluble model” or “exact solvable model”, “analytic” or “analytical” solutions

In physical science and math, we encounter some models that can be analytically solved. This means that the properties of models are fully understood and determined by the analytical solutions. In ...
4
votes
3answers
190 views

adjective-born or noun-born?

Which is correct? Claudette Colbert was a French-born American actress or Claudette Colbert was a France-born American actress? and The Texas-born LBJ was a political reformer or The ...
3
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6answers
599 views

What is an adjective for “requires a lot of work”? [closed]

For example, Starting a new business requires a lot of work. What would be an adjective in: Starting a new business is _.
3
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4answers
83 views

Could “shingled” mean “pebbly”?

One of the definition of shingle is a mass of small rounded pebbles, especially on a seashore. You can say a shingle beach (more common usage in UK than US perhaps) Is it also correct ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Adjective of proper noun containing “and”

A person from The Turks and Caicus Islands is known as what? Likewise with Trinidad and Tobago, St Kitts and Nevis, São Tomé and Principé, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. http://www.un.org/en/members/ ...
2
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4answers
354 views

“Worried person” vs. “concerned person”

According to H. Stephens, "There is a great difference between worry and concern. A worried person sees a problem, and a concerned person solves a problem". But ODE seems to be disagreeing with him: ...
1
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1answer
96 views

Consistent & accepted style(s) for hyphenating a shade of color used as an adjective for hair?

I'm helping edit a friend's book. Generally, I'm confident with my edits, yet one thing keeps nagging me. I'd appreciate expert guidance. In the book, some characters have shades of brown hair, e.g.: ...
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2answers
48 views

Definition by example

Consider the following two ways of defining a chicken egg: An oval-shaped white object with a hard shell and soft interior containing albumin. An object that a chicken lays. These are really two ...
0
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1answer
37 views

and would be a professionally paid engagement

Which is correct? "This would be a professionally paid engagement." or "This would be a professional paid engagement." Maybe "professionally" as paid is a verb and "professionally" is an adverb? ...
1
vote
11answers
550 views

Is there an adjectival form for “good etiquette”?

For example, when we say someone has good courtesy, we can say they are courteous. Is there an analogous word for having good etiquette?
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17answers
4k views

Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person?

What is an appropriate term for a young person (child, or teenager) whose words and actions mimic that of a much older person from a previous generation? Such a youngster would demonstrate strong ...
2
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2answers
230 views

“More loudly” vs “louder”. Correct usage

What is the correct usage of the adjective "loud"? Please sing louder Please sing more loudly I came across this in one of the quizzes at office, and as per them, the correct answer was option 2. ...