Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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“Proceeding” as an adjective [closed]

I thought I've heard it being used as such before, but I cannot seem to find any dictionary (online) that details it as an adjective. E.g. "The proceeding event is dinner. The preceding event was ...
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Hyphenation of words like ‘waterproof’

The Oxford dictionary states that most compound adjectives made from a noun and an adjective should be hyphenated (e.g. ‘accident-prone’, ‘camera-ready’). On the other hand, its entry for the word ...
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When to use articles before adjectives in a sentence? [migrated]

I am struggling a bit with when I need to use a/an/the before adjective followed by a noun. I understand the rules for articles in general but I discovered that this particular case is always ...
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participle adjectives

I'd like to ask for guidance on where paticipial adjectives should be placed. In the first sentence below, the past participle adjective is before the word that it modifies: 'broken chair.' But in ...
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'I like their another app!' - 'Other' versus 'another'; grammatical usage

I am helping a foreign language partner with English, but she asked me a question that stumped me. If I understand correctly, 'Other' is an adjective. 'Another' is also an adjective. Theoretically, ...
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Can “yet” modify adjective? [closed]

I think it can, but I am not sure. For example: He's the lord in the yet functioning duchy of [duchyName] (I am trying to imply that while the duchy is still present, it may crumble in the ...
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How to differentiate agents that cause harm but may or may not have the intent of doing so?

If I harm someone/something without having the intent to do so, am I being aggressive, hostile, or something else? What if I had the intent? I'm looking for ways to describe and differentiate agents ...
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Word to Describe Exploitation of Elderly

I am looking for a word(s) that describes someone who deceives/takes advantage of an old person to get that old person to name him as his caretaker, POA, successor trustee of his trust, etc. Sample ...
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Adverbs for non-gradable and base adjectives

I'd like to ask which adverbs should we use for non-gradable and base adjectives. For example : environmental When I read my book, it says : Non-gradable adjectives are not used with adverbs ...
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I'm trying to describe a sound i.e. a popping sound which is metallic. How do I phrase such a sound?

The best I could come up with is Metallic Pop which doesn't suit the rest of the writing style at all, which has a bit more imaginative use of adjectives. What other phrase could I use to describe ...
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What is a word for loving sadness?

I need a word for a love of sadness. A quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, for the feel. "Melancholy," I repeated. I liked the way it sounded, like there was music hidden somewhere inside it. (Kate ...
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114 views

Is “specieal” an adjective for species?

I'm trying to find an adjective for the word species. Usage could be: The zoo tried to maintain specieal diversity. Is specieal the correct adjective for species or is there another word? Edit: ...
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Non-sea salt sulfate or non-sea-salt sulfate?

Atmospheric sea salt particles contain sulfate but also other sources of atmospheric sulfate exist. In scientific studies on particulate sulfate air pollution it is common to split between sulfate ...
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Adjective for a type of conversation where no real information is conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection.

There is an english word (adj) that refers to a type of conversation where no real real information is being conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection. A casual conversation ...
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Is “aging” an adjective?

In the phrase the aging woman is aging an adjective or a verb used as an adjective?
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Meaning of “Busted” as an adjective [closed]

What does "busted" mean in this context? He also possesses a glass eye, an ear for heavy metal, and a busted internal radar. In reference to character Michael Burry from the movie "The Big ...
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Why do people write “women characters” but not “children actors”?

In certain feminist circles, including major publications, it is politically correct to write "women characters" instead of "female characters". But why is the word "women" pluralized? Why is it ...
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I washed the dishes clean

Firstly, is "I washed the dishes clean." a grammatically correct sentence? If it is right, I have a question about it: in this sentence, is "clean" an adverb or an adjective? I think that "I cleanly ...
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An adjective that says “which are very scarce to begin with”

I am looking for an adjective that says "which are very few to begin with" to fill the blank in the following sentence. When I was writing a story on __ female astronomers at Pitt for our school ...
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Is there a ly word describing 5 times a week? [closed]

I need a ly word for five times a week. Is there even such a word?
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An adjective to describe a person who has come back from failure

I am attempting to find an adjective to describe someone who has rebounded from failure and come back even stronger. The ___ man came back, worked harder, then succeeded after missing the game ...
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1answer
60 views

“You are spoilt” or “You are spoiled”

When helping my son with the homework in (non-native) English, I got stuck by sentence. What is correct: "You are spoilt!" or "You are spoiled!" or both alternatives? If it matters, this part ...
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What is the meaning of the adjective phrase “three-up”?

In Annie Proulx's short story, the phrase "three-up outfit" appears, used to describe the ranch of one of the characters. I do not know what "three-up" means.
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A word to describe someone constantly seeking bewilderment [closed]

So, Jason Silva coined the noun "wonderjunkie" to define this exact thing. However, I'm wondering if there's any adjective in ANY language to describe someone who is in constant search of awe, someone ...
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Communism/communism and Communist/communist [duplicate]

I have some doubts regarding capitalizing or not the following words: Communism Communist I know that Communism is generally written with capital letter, but sometimes I have this doubt and cannot ...
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64 views

'Well' after: How to use 'well after' in a sentence? [closed]

She waited till well after midnight. What does well after signify here? There are 51 definitions of well at the Merriam Webster Dictionary. It is not immediately obvious which one applies here. ...
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Single-word alternative to “that required intervention”

I'm trying to describe a process that, though intended to be fully automated, instead required human intervention in a particular instance, owing to unspecified difficulties with the process. I'm ...
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English equivalent of 'kuma.'

The kuma is the kid that lingers around you when you're eating ice cream. He/She wants the ice cream for himself/herself. Could be a brother, sister or a complete stranger. Sometimes would make a fuss ...
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Word or phrase for non-linear-but-still-greater-than-linear?

I am looking to replace "exponential" in the following sentence: "The development of new technology in this field tends to follow an (exponential) trend." In mathematics, there are many functions ...
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Single-word adjective meaning “of or pertaining to age”

I am trying to emphasize diversity in a group of people by describing their backgrounds with the following adjectives: "...[they have] a wide variety of socio-economic, intellectual and religious ...
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Stating the obvious [duplicate]

Stating the obvious has been discussed here before but in the context of a derogatory response to someone who does same. E.g. duh, dur, nss etc. What I would particularly like to know "is there a ...
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76 views

Word for someone who feels as if they must atone for something?

It is not that the person has done something that is necessarily wrong; it is more as if a situation occurred and the person feels they may have caused it, or the person feels guilty about it in ...
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What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between

For example: 1) In statistics, this attribute will always either be 0% or 100%, never in-between. 2) The boundary is either safe or destroyed, because there is never a state where it is only ...
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Adjective that means “hard to pronounce” even you know how to pronounce it

I am looking for a word to describe a word or a sentence that is hard to pronounce, in a situation that even you know the pronunciation but just can't control your tongue. Tongue-twister is the ...
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What is the difference between “intermediate” and “intermediary” when both mean the same thing? [closed]

I have a tendency to say This case is intermediary This case is an intermediate one This is an intermediate case I probably would stumble over This is an intermediary case ...
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What do you call a person that is consistent in her beliefs despite the difficulties they might cause?

I am sure there has to be a more precise word to describe a person that is not giving up on her beliefs no matter what other says. You could say consistent in her beliefs, but I am looking for ...
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Is “intrigued” an adjective or past participle in “I was intrigued when you called me”?

I've found dictionary entries supporting both situations: for adjective: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/intrigued for verb: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/intrigue I'd go ...
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Adjective for something that is spread out or not concentrated in a single location

I am looking for an adjective to describe something that cannot be found in a single location. For example, teaching jobs are spread out throughout the country, in cities and counties. They are not ...
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Adjective to describe the quality of liking to teach and/or having a talent for teaching?

I'm looking for a concise way to express the quality of enjoying or preferring to impart knowledge to other individuals. In a way, the counterpart to a person who is teachable or takes instruction ...
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a grammar question : to be in adjective clause [closed]

Please explain the grammar of this sentence: She was the first woman to be nominated for the national prize. Why do we use "to be" here? And is it necessary?
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“Lowest” vs. “lowermost”

Is there any difference between the words lowest and lowermost? When should I use either of them? Possibly lowermost should never be used?
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Though we use adjectives before nouns normally, why are some words exceptions like 'something'? Why do we use the adjectives after them? [duplicate]

For example: something , everything, anything, nothing ... special someone , everyone , anyone,, no one ... special somebody , everybody , anybody , nobody ...special
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The same as +object or possessive pronoun

Tony has the same book as I do (He now has my very book). Tony has the same book as mine (His book is a copy of my book,it has the same title,written by the same writer). Tony's car is the same as ...
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Ambiguous sentences

Consider the following two examples: I’ve heard more vicious rumors. I’ve heard less vicious rumors. Which of these examples, if any, can be considered ambiguous in interpretation?
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Word for feeling for movie characters

I watch many movies these days, and I often feel happy when the main character gets what they want in the end or sad otherwise. Is there an adjective to describe this? It appears to me that vicarious ...
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Adding an additional adjective to the attributive noun [closed]

I am writing my thesis and I'm having problems with the heading. The heading consists of a noun and an attributive noun: "Text analysis". The analysing method is called prosody: "Prosodic ...
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51 views

How to describe someone with an adjective? [closed]

I want to say that 'If I should give you an adjective that would be '. Although I am not sure if this is correct or if there is any better way to say that?
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unpolite or impolite [duplicate]

can one say "unpolite"? As in the following sentence: "it's hard for me to be unpolite." I was in class today and my teacher asked me to give him an example of an infinite sentence and that came out ...
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What is the proper suffix to change bildungsroman into an adjective? [closed]

In this case I am wondering what suffix would be the best use for bildungsroman when trying to characterize a memoir.