Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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As a noun, “abandon” is almost always preceded by the word “reckless”. [duplicate]

Feel free to correct me if you don't share the same experience, but in my own experience, usage of the word "abandon" as a noun without being apart of the phrase "reckless abandon" is extremely rare. ...
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46 views

What does this phrase mean: “His set shoulders”?

What does the adjective set refer to in this case? What would be a synonym for it?
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difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
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How to tell if an adjective is attributive or predicative [EFL context]?

I've been reviewing my grammar lately and I feel a bit stuck in adjectives. Yeah, I know it's not a big deal of a topic, but I think I need some help here because I'm in the language teacher role. I ...
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5answers
408 views

Is the word “classless” neutral in its implication, or does it have a derogatory tone?

I was drawn to the word, “classless” in Carolyn Hax’s answer to a reader in the counseling corner of Washington Post (June 7), which comes under the title, “How do you get back at a loudmouth? By ...
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9answers
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Is there a word for “people who are computer illiterate”?

Just as there is "computerate" to describe those who show familiarity with, and ability to use computers, is there a word to describe the opposite, those who are computer illiterate? The word I'm ...
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40 views

Is “pejorative” used correctly in “no pejorative bone in his body”?

He doesn't have a pejorative bone in his body. This is meant to describe a timid, non-confrontational person. Is pejorative being used correctly here, in a figurative sense?
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Using adjectives as nouns

What is the term for using an adjective in the place of a noun? It seems to come up a lot in fantasy fiction, generally used as a proper noun to describe a group ("the Twisted", "the Hunted"), but it ...
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113 views

An adjective to describe “being at sea”

I'm looking for an adjective that describes the fact that a ship is sailing at sea. Much as "afoot" describes a person being in the state of walking. I was hoping "asail" would be a word, but can't ...
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6answers
81 views

A single word adjective for “having only one interpretation; leaving no doubts”

I am looking for an adjective with a meaning: this is definite, clear, and there's no room for misinterpretation; nothing's left variadic. For example: logical statements have only one, very strict ...
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233 views

What is the adjective for “supersedure” or “primacy”?

Is there an adjective that can express the concept of a law that supersedes other laws? I would prefer a single adjective that has legal connotations, although a present participle will suffice. The ...
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75 views

“Putative” vs. “surrogate” [closed]

How similar or different is "putative" to "surrogate"? The term "surrogate father" is common, "putative father" is fairly so, too. But what may be the difference in connotation?
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138 views

Is “over-saturated” redundant?

For me, "saturated" implies there couldn't exist more of given quantity, like concentration of substance in a solution. So "over-saturated" (as in "over-saturated market") seems redundant.
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Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
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43 views

Predicate adjective acceptable with “to do”

"I did good on the test." vs. "I did well on the test." The first example sounds fine to me, and the second a bit pedantic. Is the first example standard American English and, secondly, is "good" ...
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67 views

“Despising look” vs “despised look”

Peter gave me a despising look. Peter gave me a despised look. Are the two statements above the same? My understanding is that in statement 1, I may have done something that Peter thinks ...
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36 views

Is there an adjective combining scientific and economic? [closed]

I'm doing a piece of research and am looking for an adjective that combines the words scientific and economic, so a bit like socioeconomic but scientific rather than social. I need to use it to ...
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0answers
73 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
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6answers
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A word describes the person whose homeland/origins cannot be assurely identified

I am looking for adjective describes the person whose origins cannot be identified based on his appearance features, accent, background ... etc. Some people has typical appearance features of middle ...
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3answers
89 views

Different types of “pride”

At one point while browsing the internet I came across an article that had wonderful adjectives for the different types of pride one can feel. Unfortunately I didn't bookmark it, and I can't find it! ...
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5answers
78 views

An adjective which suggests “does not support itself”?

I'm looking for an adjective which suggests that the noun it modifies can't support or justify itself, thinking mainly in terms of an argument. There is "self-defeating", but this isn't the sense I'm ...
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4answers
393 views

How would you describe this hair?

Alright, so this is a pretty pervasive style in modern CGI characters now: Colloquially I'd refer to it as "anime hair but real" but anyone who isn't familiar with anime won't even know what that ...
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Order of adjectives in a sentence [closed]

I'm making a website that has search results, and I hide some of them I want to show the user that some are hidden Which one should I say? Showing first 25 results only or Showing 25 first ...
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58 views

Hyphenation of the suffix “like”

I am having trouble understanding the following: "the achievable rate of the optimal AF scheme performs close to the cut-set like bound obtained in this paper" I think that the word "like" (above) ...
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A word that means 'hateful but indispensable'

Is there a single adjective meaning 'hateful but indispensable' or something close? (Not "love-hate"). British or American would be OK.
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Part of speech of “that”?

In this sentence: Its shape resembles that of a kangaroo’s hind foot. What part of speech would that be?
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Non-aerodynamic meanings of 'vane'

I tried to look for other meanings of 'vane' not related to aerodynamics (weather vane, vane of a feather, etc), and I wasn't really successful. Oxforddictionaries.com gives an example of adjective as ...
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Is there any word available for an incident occurred and vanished in front of eyes?

I was confused, when one of my friends was writing his name on a lead from vapor of mouth: I saw his name for a few seconds and after that it automatically disappeared. So what can I call this ...
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What does Pedantic mean when used as an adjective [closed]

According to Dictionary.com, Pedantic can mean ostentatious in one's learning Ostentatious means to show off , to attract attention. The way I interpret it is that one is so focused on ...
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Can someone provide an explanation regarding the etymology of the adjective “hell-bent?”

It's etymology is given as: hell-bent, 1835, U.S., originally slang, from hell + bent How do the the words "hell + bent," when taken together, form the definition "determined to achieve ...
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124 views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
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64 views

Demonstrated through? [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "Excellent communication, organizational, and leadership skills demonstrated through various awards and volunteer activities."
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105 views

What is wrong with mixing “taller” and “tallest” like this?

Although the towers appear identical, the west tower is the tallest, standing 16 feet taller than the east tower. What might be wrong? Does it have to do with comparative and superlative degrees? ...
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Half doesn't or half don't? [duplicate]

What’s the right version of these two? Half of the students doesn’t bother to show up. Half of the students don’t bother to show up. Or are both right?
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Adjectives to describe a legal system that has a number of limitations

Im finding an adjective describing a judicial system that has many limitations like the system has lax regulations and sanctions are not harsh enough. Looking forward to your replies.
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2answers
183 views

What does “candid” mean besides being honest?

According to various unnamed dictionaries, candid means "being honest, telling the truth". However, when I googled the word, a lot of pictures of women in bikinis popped up! Can someone tell me why ...
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784 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
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3answers
114 views

Can “erudite” be used to describe things other than humans?

I have heard the adjective erudite in relation to humans, but I was inditing an essay and pondering whether I could implement it to describe a school. An erudite school. Is that permissible?
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What is the correct usage of the word “Cartesian”?

While working on an essay for my English class I included this sentence: The best solution is to take a page out of Cartesian theory and take a proven approach. However, my teacher corrected it ...
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Is a phrase 'your happy being' correct?

My friend asked me to the beach by a sentence; 'The beach is waiting for your happy being.' Is the sentence he used correct?
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Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending

Questions on the use of lesser have appeared on here before, but I was reading a book on grammar which states the following (I omitted parts to keep it brief, but I retained what I think are the ...
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The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
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4answers
162 views

What is the difference between “graphic” and “graphical” as adjectives?

Are the two adjectives completely interchangeable, or is there a distinction between them? Does it matter which I choose?
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2answers
775 views

“More drunk” or “drunker”?

I am at a party. I drink wine till I'm drunk. Then I drink some more. So am I more drunk now, or drunker?
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“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
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2answers
79 views

“He is loved”, is 'loved' an adjective or a verb?

He is loved. This is something that I've always kind of wondered. In a sentence like this, is loved a verb or an adjective? Can it be considered either?
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Is a determiner considered an adjective or a separate part?

I came across some blogs which states that determiners are types of adjectives (according to traditional grammar), whereas wiki (which I do not entirely trust) indicates some key differences. after ...
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7answers
1k views

What is the word for something that is non-divisible?

I'm looking for a generic word, an adjective, that means non-divisible. Like the opposite of compound. I am looking for a word I can use in the context of programming, where you can have data types ...
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106 views

What is difference between “faulty” and “broken”?

I was working as an intern in Malaysia. Once day, my advisor asked me to check some electronic device. He said: "Can you check them for me if which one is faulty please separate it to another ...
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Can we use all “nouns” as adjective? [closed]

can we use "truth" or "thought" as adjective for example; "truth" nurturing is through imagination or "thought sun", thought grove" &...? This question body meets the quality of words ...