Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Is there a collateral adjective for 'game'?

I was looking for an adjective that would describe anything game-like that is either taken directly from Ancient Greek or Latin. 'Ludic' comes to mind, but it came to assume the same connotations as ...
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1answer
138 views

Why isn't USA an attributive adjective, (but US is)?

When referring to the country, both US and USA (among other forms), are acceptable. But when used as an adjective, USA sounds wrong. US Army, but not USA Army. Even in the expanded form (for ...
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60 views

“to-know-each-other” or “knowing-each-other”

We gave the new members a to-know-each-other break. We gave the new members a knowing-each-other break. What it means is: the boy came back to the break that was scheduled so that guests had ...
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4answers
116 views

What is the correct way to use an intensifier followed by an adjective and then a plural noun? I am specifically interested in the intensifier, “too”

Example: You should not place too high expectations on your children. Using the phrase, "such high expectations"seems to change the meaning slightly. I´m familiar with the construction too+ adj.+ a+ ...
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3answers
109 views

What's the appropriate word for someone that's leaving something?

What's the most appropriate word for someone that's leaving something (or somewhere)? For example, if someone leaves an association permanently, what do I call him? The term will be used in a ...
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2answers
49 views

Use of noun vs. adjective in store signs [closed]

I saw the following on a store sign in a foreign country. EXCELLENCE IN HAND DRIP COFFEE Isn't it better to use adjective as in EXCELLENT HAND DRIP COFFEE ?
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1answer
48 views

What is the difference (if any) between common interests and interests in common?

Is there any difference between "common interests" and "interests in common"? One can certainly ask: "Do you have any interests in common?" Can you also ask: "Do you, guys, have any ...
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4answers
80 views

Is there a word for the opposite of being hollow?

I'm looking for an adjective that describes an object that, rather than is just the outside, is instead just the inside. Searching for antonyms of hollow, I have only found the word solid, which ...
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2answers
61 views

Adjective/ Collocation with 'Caution:' — Why does 'huge' sound odd?

Simon Johnson, Scottish Political Editor, The Telegraph UK, 11:08PM BST 07 May 2015: Nicola Sturgeon: I'm treating exit poll with huge caution Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: “I’d treat the exit poll ...
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141 views

What adjective would you use for “not readable color”?

Imagine you received an email, which looks like this: I guess there's an adjective to express that either the background or the font color should be changed, because it's really hard to read. My ...
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2answers
449 views

Is integratable a correct adjective for 'capable of integration'?

I'm looking for an adjective that captures the meaning of 'capable of integration' in a systems/software context (so not integrable in mathematical context). Integratable seems to be somewhat in use, ...
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75 views

Is the phrase “collaborative skills” appropriate/correct in this context?

If one were to suggest that they had "...strong documentation, collaborative, and communication skills." My first thought is that it's a bit more awkward than saying ...
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82 views

How to say a person is a star of something or some activity? [closed]

How can we call a person who has excelled in some event, a sort of a star in it?
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3answers
26 views

Would “objectively necessary” convey that something is necessary as a matter of fact, regardless of opinions?

In Russian "objectively necessary" (literal translation) means necessary as a matter of fact, not as a matter of judgement. Like, e.g., the water is objectively necessary for plants to grow. Does ...
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2answers
126 views

Is it necessary to describe a girl or a boy as “young”?

Is it necessary to describe a girl or a boy as "young"; e.g., the young girl wore a ribbon? By using the noun "girl" or "boy", is it not assumed that s/he is young?
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3answers
58 views

Is this misplaced adjective ok, even though it is technically incorrect?

I am writing a technical how-to manual on a hardware/software system, and I've written the following phrase: "To avoid taking up unnecessary storage space on your computer, ..." Looking back at ...
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9answers
213 views

Word for the feeling of dread/complacency that comes when starting something new

Is there a word for the feeling of that comes when faced with something new and you really have to push yourself hard to actually start and get into the flow of said task or situation? It seems to be ...
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3answers
93 views

What is the opposite of a catalyst?

A catalyst is a compound which allows a chemical reaction to occur without undergoing a chemical change itself. Thus it is not 'used up' when performing its function. Thus the word catalyst is a ...
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3answers
41 views

Person who has had a program hard wired into their daily routine

What is the best word to describe a person that has done the same thing contractually for a long period of time, to the point in which they still carry out these tasks without being specifically ...
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2answers
803 views

“Almost-finished” versus “almost finished”

I am attaching an almost-finished version of the report. I am attaching an almost finished version of the report. Which is the preferred form, (1) or (2)? Why?
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1answer
69 views

What's the word for 'new yet old'? [closed]

I am trying to think of the word that describes something that is new yet old, contemporary yet classic, progressive yet traditional or any other similar meanings. The word is used to describe a ...
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2answers
180 views

Negative Comparatives & Superlatives

An Adjective can, in general, be converted to Comparative (-er) & Superlative (-est) ; for example : good better best happy happier happiest Now Superlative means "Highest in quality", ...
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46 views

Fictional vs. Fiction

I apologize in advance if my question has been asked before: there's this club I know called the "Fiction Film Club", and while I know it's used here to specify what kind of film and that sometimes ...
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23answers
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Adjective describing a person who has lots of children, not “fertile”

Is there a single adjective that means "this person has lots of children"? Context: I'm not actually talking about a person. I'm talking about a data structure in a computer program, where objects ...
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1answer
59 views

Is it correct to say “I think sth important”?

I know that I can say: I consider this idea important. I deem this film stupid. I regard my health as important. But can I say: I think money/health/love/etc. important. Or does it ...
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78 views

Is “soliciting” in the example sentence an adjective or a noun? [closed]

In the following sentence, I would like to understand if the word "soliciting" is a noun or an adjective. "Is my reluctance that soliciting?" Here, the word "soliciting" appears to be a kind of ...
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59 views

Use of “play” followed by an adjective

English is my second language so there are a lot of new things to me. I just came across several sentences containing the phrases "play dead", "play sick" and "play cute" so I wonder if the verb ...
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33 views

How should I join the following sentence so it becomes an adjective?

Wow, that was the most philosophical I-don't-care-that-you're-not-a-virgin explanation I've ever heard. Should I write it like this? Or should I omit some words?
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1answer
53 views

Analyzing 'as' in ascertain, assure, etc

It seems that in some words, like in the word 'ascertain' or in 'assure', the 'a' or the combination of 'a' and 's' transforms the adjective into a verb. My question is, is there a term in the ...
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68 views

Abdominal; Why isn't it 'abdomenal' (with an 'e'), and is there a name for such words?

Why is the word 'abdominal' formed of an altered spelling of 'abdomen'? I have noticed other words similar, but none spring to mind; is there a name for them?
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63 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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20answers
8k views

Is there a word that means cheating but legitimate?

Is there a word that means cheating and legitimate at the same time? For example: I play a quiz game and set the number of questions to one. So, I get 100% of my answers correct. That's cheating, ...
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8answers
153 views

Antonym: “repetitive”

Let's say there's a video game that never gets boring no matter how much you play it, because there's always something new to do in it. What would be a term to describe the game? The opposite would ...
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83 views

“Undersize” as an adjective? Where did the “d” go?

As I was reading this article, I came across the word "undersize" being used three separate times as an adjective. I was confused, as I don't think I've ever seen that word used that way before (or at ...
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2answers
110 views

A word for “being worked on”

Are there any adjectives meaning "being worked on" or "being in progress or development"? I need an intermediate step between "open" and "close" (talking about the process of fixing a software bug or ...
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1answer
160 views

How do you describe someone who is into incest?

pedophile - one who is into pre-pubescent children _____phile - one who is into incest? Is there a single word that fits into "He's a ______" to describe someone who is into incest? A hyphenated ...
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13answers
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An adjective or a single word that means something is “new” and “different” at the same time

When we say this approach is "New," new, here, doesn't necessarily imply that the approach is different from preceding approaches. When we say that it is "different," different, here, doesn't imply ...
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2answers
91 views

Term for “brain-watering”

A mouth can water, but what does a brain do? I'm looking for a term that implies intellectual thirst, as when one has worked all day at a mindless task and only wants to read a novel, or essay, or ...
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2answers
145 views

Word for someone who isn't detail-oriented

I am pretty sure I have seen a word for someone who often misses small details, but it has slipped out of my mind. Any ideas?
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173 views

Is there an adjective describing the feeling of touching a cool, water-condensated surface?

I'm trying to describe the peculiar feeling when you touch a cool, water-condensated surface (like a soda can freshly out of the fridge, the indoor side of a window in winter, etc.). It's kind of an ...
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29 views

First strike vs. first-strike

I'm a bit confused about when to hyphenate in certain circumstances. Specifically, which of the following would I hyphenate? Launch a first strike Launch a second strike Damage first ...
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4answers
353 views

Adjective to describe “just because… doesn't necessarily mean…”

This is one of those phrases used very commonly (and apparently subject to lots of scrutiny on this website), but is difficult to define and also far too long to submit to a reverse dictionary. Let's ...
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16answers
2k views

Is there a word that means deliberately ignorant, choosing to ignore?

I know what this word really means but I cannot help to think that ignorant also means he ignores his surrounding or the consequences of his actions. "He was ignorant, unwilling to warn the police ...
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2answers
128 views

Frequently Vs Frequent /Adverb form or Adjective form /

So normally adjectives like (frequent) modify a noun or a pronoun, whereas adverbs like (frequently) modify verbs or adjectives However, In this sentence both options seemd fine to me but i ...
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7answers
252 views

Is there a word for the belief that everything is possible? [closed]

Either a word for belief itself or to describe a person who believes that any task is possible often in an irrational way.
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0answers
41 views

when “near” could be considered incorrect grammatically or semantically

Let's verify the word "nearby" is part of a constituent NP in the OP's #2 example: OP.2a. I live in a town nearby. <-- OP's #2 example it-clefts: OP.2b. It is [in a town nearby] that I live. ...
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What's an adjective that describes Ophelia or someone who gives in to fate?

In the Shakespearean play, Hamlet, Ophelia is found drowned in a body of water. I believe she saw all of her opportunities in front of her but as the people around her (i.e. Polonius, Claudius, ...
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I need an adjective to precede the word “method” [closed]

I am writing a scientific article and I need to give an adjective to a method that I am describing. The method introduces fuzzy logic, which could be the basis for the adjective.
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Ambiguous adjectives: fearful, suspicious, etc

Adjectives, for example... Suspicious, fearful, stressful, hopeful, etc... These adjectives describe that the addressee causes the certain quality or has himself the quality. "A fearful man" may ...
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I found an unusual usage of adj, please tell me how it works [closed]

Following the terror attacks in London on July 7, 2005, the then Prime Minister Tony Blair insisted those responsible were motivated by an "evil ideology," ... From CNN. It uses those ...