0
votes
3answers
70 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
3
votes
7answers
371 views

What's an adjective that means “has high expectations”

If you were to describe a person as someone who has high expectations or standards (of their work, peers, or subordinates), what word would you use? "Demanding" is the closest I have come but that's ...
1
vote
5answers
154 views

I got first place in a competition where it's possible to tie. How would I distinguish that I was an untied first?

I would like to avoid using the phrase "untied first" unless that is actually the accepted way to say it.
4
votes
18answers
1k views

What is the word meaning “going on and on for miles and miles”?

Edit: I was walking down an intolerably long sidewalk one day, and every time a mounted another hill, I saw more of it seeming to stretch out before me. It got me to thinking: is there a word for ...
1
vote
4answers
459 views

single word adjective for 'temperature-related'

As temporal is the adjective which describes things relating to time, is there such a word for temperature? The hyphenated 'temperature-related' works, but it is not a single word. For context, I'm ...
2
votes
3answers
117 views

Is there a word describing someone who is ignorant in the ways of Science?

I am not sure if dogmatic or doctrinaire covers it, but I am looking for a word to describe someone (like a politician) who is willfully unknowing of how the scientific method works and what science ...
2
votes
2answers
130 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
2
votes
7answers
232 views

Adjacent means side-by-side. What's the word for behind-one-another?

Example: rows 9 and 10 in the theatre are ??? rows. Alternatively: rows 9 an 10 are ???-ly adjacent (while seats B and C are laterally adjacent). There are words like subsequent, consecutive, etc., ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Use of “Afghani” as an adjective

So we know that the noun "Afghan" is preferred over "Afghani" when it comes to describing the people of Afghanistan, but what's the scoop for using it as an adjective? For example, is saying an ...
-1
votes
1answer
117 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

“Artificial” vs. “faux” vs. “fake”

Do these words have a different meaning? Should we say artificial sugar or sweetener? Should we say artificial fur or faux fur? Is there a rule that defines the border for artificial/faux/fake? ...
-1
votes
2answers
61 views

Inconsecutive or nonconsecutive or …? [closed]

I want to say that the data is not like 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159 but can be 154, 156, 157, 159. How do I negate the word "consecutive"? I was not able to find it in the dictionary. I have found ...
1
vote
5answers
201 views

Is it “to be left free to do something” or “to be let free to do something”?

I know "to leave someone alone" and "to let someone be on their own". What happens when the adjective is followed by a verb (in the infinitive)? Is it "*Leave me free to do whatever I want." / "*I ...
1
vote
4answers
308 views

Word for “what-if scenarios”

What is the English word that best captures "what if" situation? Something along the lines of "What if something goes wrong". It is close to being pessimistic. But pessimistic is too negative. I am ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Calendric vs Calendrical

When choosing an adjective to refer to the nature of a calendar system, such as how we have months of varying length, is it more appropriate to use calendric or calendrical? Is there any difference, ...
5
votes
4answers
203 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
3
votes
2answers
407 views

“High aspirations” vs. “large aspirations”

When you intend to say someone has a strong desire to achieve something high or great, is it proper to say they have "high aspirations"? Or would it be "large aspirations", or something else?
-1
votes
2answers
57 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“As evidenced by” or “as evident by”?

I have this sentence: Group theory is one of my favourite areas in mathematics, as evidenced by the fact that I chose to do two group theory modules in my undergraduate course. I am wondering if ...
0
votes
1answer
357 views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
4
votes
3answers
4k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
1
vote
1answer
64 views

What is the difference between 'The Germany National team' and 'the German national team'? [duplicate]

I can't say I get it. I think the difference is: 'The Germany National team' is team which represents Germany as a country. And it is its formal title. 'the German national team' is team which ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Why is there “Germany National Team”, not “German National Team”?

Why is the team from Germany called "Germany National Team", not "German National Team"? On official Internet sites, it is the same for every official national team; Germany National, France National, ...
0
votes
1answer
121 views

“Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?

I'm writing a sentence about the job of the memory and am characterizing absorption with memory. How do I say "memorical absorption" correctly? Memorial sounds like a noun...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

“Hierarchical” vs. “hierarchic”

When do you use hierarchical and when hierarchic? For example, hierarchical database sounds much more native to me, even as a non-native English speaker. But why isn't it hierarchic database? Edit: ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
1
vote
2answers
168 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...
1
vote
3answers
61 views

How would you group the terms “Single” and “Pair”?

I am working on a website at the moment and I am trying to perfect the User Experience. The products on the store are either sold on their own, or as pairs. What I want is a word or phrase to put in ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

How would you call a word that doesn't exist or translate well into another language?

I've run into this situation several times, being a native Spanish speaker. There are some words you just can't translate into another language. Is there a particular word to describe this? I'm not ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
5
votes
5answers
3k views

“Bald Faced Lie” vs. “Bold Faced Lie”

Which of these is correct? What is the origin of this expression? I've searched here on the exchange and haven't found an answer.
0
votes
2answers
162 views

“The distance is great” vs. “high” vs. “large”

I don't want to change the structure of the sentence. So please tell me which adjective works better in this sentence — great, high or large. Due to the resolution of cameras, vehicles are not ...
2
votes
3answers
602 views

Difference between “original” and “genuine” [closed]

I often buy something in an online shop. I noticed some descriptions say an item is original or genuine. What is the difference? For example, say there's an Apple USB cable, and another, fake Apple ...
0
votes
4answers
142 views

Electrical/electric [duplicate]

Which is correct: Electric power engineering student Electrical power engineering student
1
vote
1answer
98 views

What is the equivalent of a “Good Watch” for an audiobook or record?

We say that a movie is a "good watch" and a book is a "good read". Somehow, to say that an audiobook or an album is a "good listen" doesn't sound right to my ears, but perhaps that's only because ...
1
vote
1answer
202 views

What is the use of By the time? [closed]

What is the best way of using By the time ? I searched in google where there wasn't exact example ?
2
votes
4answers
77 views

Word to express a building's potential to be guarded against a forced exit

I am looking for a word that expresses the idea of a prison being difficult to escape because of its physical construction, in a similar way that 'fortified' means a structure is difficult to attack ...
2
votes
6answers
724 views

Word for a smart and stubborn person? [duplicate]

I'm trying to find a single adjective that would fit the best to the following person's trait: One who thinks knows everything/best, and often doesn't listen to orders and instead completes some ...
1
vote
6answers
2k views

Word for sadness at something ending, but excited about new

Is there a word that describes the combination of feeling sad for an ending of something, but excited at new prospects. The closest I had was "bittersweet change" Examples: 1) At the end of a ...
-1
votes
3answers
228 views

adjective describing a personal difficulty

Trying to think of a word that describes an action that is easily accomplished by most people yet said person cannot. Example: Since fifth grade, I have played the bass in my school orchestra, ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Accredited school versus accredited degree

Is it proper use of the adjective "accredited" to say or write "an accredited degree?" I can't find it used in this manner in a dictionary and I feel like the adjective in this sense should be applied ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water”

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
1
vote
3answers
637 views

What's the difference between “erroneous” and “wrong”? [closed]

Are these words totally interchangeable? I made the [erroneous/wrong] decision.
5
votes
5answers
843 views

What is more appropriate to say “pay especial attention to” or “pay special attention to”

Merriam Webster Special 1 : distinguished by some unusual quality especially : being in some way superior 2 : held in particular esteem 3 a : readily distinguishable from others of ...
3
votes
1answer
133 views

What's a good adjective to whether a set/range can be “tessellated”

Say I have the concept of a "Range", which is basically an "Interval" in Mathematics. If a range is inclusive ("closed") on one end and exclusive on the other, it has the following property: It ...
19
votes
6answers
2k views

Can “wet” be used for liquids other than water?

Wet can be used to describe being dowsed in liquids such as beer, milk, juice, urine etc. All of these, however, are water-based. Can wet be used for a liquid that has no water? Can you be wet by ...
2
votes
2answers
803 views

“The later part of the 20th century” vs. “the latter part of the 20th century”

For the sentence fragment: "...during the later part of the 20th century" using "latter" sounds better to me: "...during the latter part of the 20th century" But most websites I find have ...
1
vote
2answers
546 views

“It was still bright/light outside.” Is one of these incorrect?

If I want to say it's still somewhat early in the evening and it's not so dark outside so that you can still see things quite clearly almost like during daytime, which of the following sentences would ...
2
votes
3answers
638 views

Is it correct to use the comparative adjective “blacker?”

You can find "bluer," "redder," "greener," and "whiter" in the dictionary, but not "blacker." This seems mystifying. In his "El Paso" song, Marty Robbins sang, "Blacker than night were the eyes of ...