3
votes
1answer
96 views

What does “wishy-washy” mean?

Question: What does it mean when something is "wishy-washy"? Is it informal? Is it American English, British English or both?
-4
votes
1answer
57 views

Antedecent of “naked” in “I would like to paint a picture of you naked”

You’re such a pretty person, I would like to paint a picture of you naked. Does this mean "you’ll undress while I get my brushes", or does it mean "strike a pose while I take my clothes off"?
2
votes
2answers
73 views

Where does the word “button-down” come from?

I was wondering where the term 'button-down' comes from. I tried to do some research but I was not very successful... How was the word button-down formed? Is it a compound ? Does it originate from ...
0
votes
5answers
89 views

I want to know the difference between “you are false” and “you are wrong” [closed]

What is the difference between false and wrong? Is there any difference in meaning?
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Use of the adjective Nearshore

I'm working on a web page which target are American companies interested in hire Mexican Engineers for work in USA (in place or remote). I have a version of the web page headline: "PAINLESSLY HIRE THE ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Adjective association

Is there a rule that states what word adjectives in a sentence will link to? If I say I have a big cookie jar it's still a correct sentence. The word "cookie" isn't an adjective, but "cookie ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

What is the difference between “graduate students” and “postgraduate students”?

I am reading about finding a good university for master studies and I am really confused if graduate students are the same as postgraduate students. Are the terms synonyms, or do they refer to ...
1
vote
3answers
122 views

Modern use of “bourgeoisie”

How can I use bourgeoisie properly in this day and age? I understand that at one time it meant part of the wealthy "middle class". Back then the middle class owned the means to production (merchants ...
2
votes
2answers
197 views

“Brunette” vs. “brown” and “blonde” vs. “yellow”

Why is that we never use these terms interchangeably? I.e. one wouldn't say "I've painted my walls a deep brunette". Why is it that "brunette" and "blonde" are used exclusively in reference to hair ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

“Artificial” vs. “faux” vs. “fake”

Do these words have a different meaning? Should we say artificial sugar or sweetener? Should we say artificial fur or faux fur? Is there a rule that defines the border for artificial/faux/fake? ...
1
vote
2answers
134 views

Why does “forgetive” mean “creative”, not “easy to forget things”?

As the title says. It surprised me when I found this online dictionary entry at the time I tried to express "easy to forget things" and "forgetive" appeared in my mind. What is the history or ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

What is the difference between 'The Germany National team' and 'the German national team'? [duplicate]

I can't say I get it. I think the difference is: 'The Germany National team' is team which represents Germany as a country. And it is its formal title. 'the German national team' is team which ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Why is there “Germany National Team”, not “German National Team”?

Why is the team from Germany called "Germany National Team", not "German National Team"? On official Internet sites, it is the same for every official national team; Germany National, France National, ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Usage of “extensive participation”

What exactly does 'extensive participation' mean? Can I use this phrase in a sentence like this: Due to her extensive participation she hardly got time for her studies.
-2
votes
1answer
41 views

antiquarian (adjective) misuse re: dictionary definition

multiple choice ... "antiquarian book" refers to: 1. an antique book about anything 2. any age book about old books 3. a book about people who deal in old books 4. a book in the antiquar language or ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

A word for “nobody depends on me”

If I do not depend on anybody, I can say: I am independent And if nobody depends on me. Is there a monoword to describe that?
2
votes
2answers
65 views

a person with a fossilized mind

How to describe a person who have a fossilized mind? whatever he hears he will not (get it into one's head)
1
vote
2answers
273 views

“Extended” vs. “extensive” [closed]

What's the difference between these two? I found the following after some research, “Extended” has to do with time, “extensive” with space. An extended tour lasts a long time; an extensive tour ...
1
vote
1answer
193 views

Does an adjective apply to both nouns when joined with 'and'?

Can you grab the blue shirts and socks? Is the above sentence stating that both the shirts and the socks are blue? Or only the shirts? At this stage, I am leaning towards the earlier (only the ...
2
votes
2answers
171 views

What does “buggy” mean in “a hot, buggy August morning”?

While reading a short story, I came across a use of the word "buggy" that I'm not familiar with: It’s a hot, buggy August morning, too early for lunch, so we find a deserted picnic table without ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

“a high enough” vs. “high enough a”

After editing a question recently, the OP undid those edits stating he did not like the bad changes I made with regards to the grammar of the post. The author originally wrote: Nobody in this ...
9
votes
7answers
812 views

Prefix or adjective meaning “one and a half”

Is there a prefix or adjective that means "one and a half", as "tri-" or "triple" is for "three"? The exact usage I have is to describe "18" in terms of a dozen. Where I live they've started making ...
2
votes
4answers
341 views

Adjective meaning “that can be tied”

What is the most common adjective used to describe objects that can be tied. I would think of tieable but it does not seem to exist in the wiktionary.
3
votes
1answer
127 views

It was established on a rocky foundation [closed]

It was established on a rocky foundation. Does it mean steady or shaky?
3
votes
0answers
63 views

Words that are members of multiple classes of words (without changing form) [duplicate]

By "class of word" I mean a noun, verb, adjective, adverb etc. This notation came from reading the definitions of these words themselves. For example noun grammar any member of a class of words ...
1
vote
3answers
644 views

What's the difference between “erroneous” and “wrong”? [closed]

Are these words totally interchangeable? I made the [erroneous/wrong] decision.
2
votes
1answer
166 views

Visual connotation associated with “lucid”

I’m interested in the definition and connotation of lucid when it comes to physical objects: what does a lucid object look like? From Merriam-Webster: suffused with light : luminous ...
19
votes
6answers
2k views

Can “wet” be used for liquids other than water?

Wet can be used to describe being dowsed in liquids such as beer, milk, juice, urine etc. All of these, however, are water-based. Can wet be used for a liquid that has no water? Can you be wet by ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

When to use “huge” and “big” [closed]

What is the difference between huge and big? For example: He made a huge difference to the team. He made a big difference to the team. Is there a difference in meaning?
0
votes
2answers
250 views

Can we say “probable” where we have to say “possible”?

Can we say probable where we have to say possible? What is the exact meaning of that? I have searched this, but I didn't get the perfect example of that.
2
votes
1answer
200 views

Meaning of “deep” in “deep, acute curves suggest confusion”

Deep, acute curves, on the other hand, suggest confusion, turbulence, even frenzy, as in the violence of waves in a storm, the chaos of a tangled thread, or the turmoil of lines suggested by the ...
-1
votes
1answer
143 views

Meaning of “originating” in the context

In the computer science, the program is processed as a sequence of commands which is called "control flow". At some point, it branches and a different branch of code is processed. In an article I ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

“It's all academic”

What exactly does 'It's all academic' mean when referring to the closing moments of a sports game? You'll often hear 'This one's academic!' or 'It's all academic from this point forward' or 'It's all ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“Interaction technologies” vs. “interactive technologies”

What is your feeling about the differences between the two?
-3
votes
1answer
354 views

History of the words “conservative” and “liberal”

I’m curious in the history of political parties of the USA. Initially in 1861 Abraham Lincoln was the first President to represent the Republican party which has always been stated as conservative ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Quintessential vs essential?

While quintessential means 'representing the most perfect or typical example of a quality or class' [OED], it defines essential as 'absolutely necessary; extremely important'. I have noticed frequent ...
-3
votes
2answers
236 views

“Troublesome” vs. “annoying” [closed]

What is the difference between "troublesome" and "annoying", especially when used to describe a person?
-1
votes
1answer
222 views

What's the difference between “active” and “busy”? [closed]

What's the difference in meaning between saying "I'm an active person." and "I'm a busy person."?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

what's the difference between “apparent”, “evident” and “obvious”?

I believe they are all the same, but is there any case in which not all of them are correct? Here are the examples, from an English textbook: 1. It is (quite) __ that he took the wrong path. ...
44
votes
13answers
8k views

When to use “nude” and when “naked”

The question is quite clear. Is there any difference (semantically or connotationally, if that's a word) between nude and naked? Nude seems more formal to me, but I'm not quite sure. Interesting: ...
-1
votes
3answers
176 views

Using the adjective “expressive” to mean an object allows for expression?

My intention is to say that systems of a particular type allow users to express ideas on them. I wanted to give the concept a more concise/general name, as a title for such systems. I called them ...
-3
votes
2answers
478 views

What is the difference between “eclectic” and “diverse”?

It seems like eclectic and diverse have the same meaning, but there must be some difference. What is it? Did a search on Google but didn't find any info.
-1
votes
1answer
56 views

What is the difference between “Distribution Worker” and “Distributing Worker”?

I cannot differentiate when I should use a noun like "distribution" as an adjective to another noun, or when should I use an "-ing" participle as an adjective. Could you please clarify the differences ...
-1
votes
1answer
513 views

About the word “casual” [closed]

According to what I knew and I have found on the web, in general the word casual is the opposite of everyday. But in the special case when it refers to clothing, it has a similar meaning to "everyday ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Interpreting “not bad”

In conversations people often use "not bad". How to interpret this? Are they feeling good or just not bad or somewhere in the middle? Does it depend on the context? E.g.: X: How are you doing ...
0
votes
2answers
394 views

Polite Compliments

Is a "polite compliment" necessarily a redundant statement when used in a group of people as opposed to a one-to-one situation?
-1
votes
3answers
312 views

“Restricted quality” vs. “limited quality” [closed]

I want to express that an entity has different levels of quality concerning some criterion and these levels are ordered. For an example, I have five different levels: Entity X is of high quality ...
1
vote
3answers
696 views

Using an adjective to describe something that is already intended

Is there a word that describes the case of using an adjective to describe a noun that already suggests as much? Examples the pretty model won all of the awards the smart genius answered ...
0
votes
3answers
207 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?