2
votes
1answer
69 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
1
vote
3answers
157 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Is the adjectival form “to be concatenated” correct?

I have the following sentence: Fetch the transformations which need to be concatenated. Is the following adjectival form of which need to be concatenated correct? Fetch the to be ...
-1
votes
1answer
211 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
1
vote
2answers
125 views

Is it grammatically incorrect to say that someone desires ambiguous brevity?

Brevity is a noun, is it not? So, ambiguous, being an adjective, should be able to modify it, correct? That was the first thought I had regarding the subject, but for some reason it just doesn't sound ...
1
vote
4answers
305 views

Is “inbuilt” a word? Is it alright to use it or should I use “built in”?

I searched and found this: “Built-in” or “In-built”, which says inbuilt is fine. But in a reddit comment, I was told that I should use built in instead of inbuilt. Which is correct? I am using the ...
1
vote
2answers
122 views

Variations on “a [technical term] is said to be [adjective]” suited to scientific publications

(I'll use “spooky-graphoid” as a randomly made-up technical term and “saturated” as a random adjective from the scientific vernacular.) First, when it comes to the definition of a “saturated ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

“a high enough” vs. “high enough a”

After editing a question recently, the OP undid those edits stating he did not like the bad changes I made with regards to the grammar of the post. The author originally wrote: Nobody in this ...
-1
votes
2answers
126 views

“The dead” vs. “the dead people”

Which one of these is correct: The dead were buried near the village. The dead people were buried near the village. I tend to think that both are fine, however in my test I chose second ...
-2
votes
3answers
6k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
0
votes
2answers
312 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
1
vote
4answers
126 views

Is “a future musician” grammatical?

I want to become a musician in the future. Is it correct to say I am a future musician. I want to put it in my bio for Twitter. Are there any other better phrases?
1
vote
2answers
687 views

Is a sentence beginning with “Different from” not so good?

I saw one topic on the wordreference forum discussing whether a sentence could begin with "Different from" (see the post). The example sentences in that post are A: Different from Drug A, Drug B ...
0
votes
2answers
341 views

multiple adjectives next to each other [closed]

In low volume, a melody sad love song is playing in a mobile phone placed on the side table. Do you see the three adjectives (melody sad love) together? Is that correct?
1
vote
2answers
163 views

Why “afraid of” and not “brave of”?

Recently my preschooler's teacher started teaching kids that they should be "brave of" something and not "afraid of" it. Maybe it is simply because "brave of" is never used, but that syntax strikes me ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammaticality of “a high number of”

Is the phrase "a high number of" considered correct? Or is it only correct to say "a large number of"? Example: Japan has a high number of active volcanoes.
1
vote
3answers
259 views

Can we use “very” with a “non-” adjective?

Can we use very with an adjective that starts with "non"? For example: Absolute pathnames should be avoided in #include directives because they make the program very nonportable. For some ...
2
votes
1answer
340 views

How do I write 'first and second order' properly?

I am writing about first-order and second-order quantities. Should I put one hyphen, as in "first and second-order", or two, as in "first- and second-order". Or should I do something ...
-1
votes
2answers
361 views

“I am full to die.” — Is this sentence correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I am angry to die” or “I am angry to death” I am full to die. I meant to say, "I might die because I am full." Is this a correct expression?
5
votes
3answers
308 views

'Monthly' and 'annual' as descriptors

When I am describing a service that is billed for once a month I write, "This is a monthly service." When describing a service that is billed for once a year I use, "This is an annual service." ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“Is this the right way?” vs “Is this the correct way?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “right” vs “correct” I've had this question for a long time. Which sentence is grammatically correct? Is this the right way? Is this the correct way?
1
vote
2answers
133 views

Using the word “deadbeat” as an adjective

BBC quotes President Obama: America is "not a deadbeat nation", US President Barack Obama has said, as he warned Republicans unconditionally to approve a rise in the US debt ceiling. It appears ...
4
votes
6answers
68k views

“Belated happy birthday” or “happy belated birthday”?

What's the correct sentence? Belated happy birthday! Happy belated birthday!
0
votes
2answers
192 views

“Special” or “specials” [closed]

I would like to know if in the following sentence, special should be plural or not. The red apples are not special. I do not feel that this is correct.
6
votes
4answers
3k views

“How far” vs “How long”

I am not clear how to use "How long" and "How far". Suppose I got in a taxi or cab to my hotel, how should I say to the driver if I want to know the distance to the hotel? Which of the following is ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “most superior” correct?

I am reviewing an article, and the author uses the phrase ... this algorithm achieves the most superior fairness ... Initially I thought the phrase is not correct, just like saying that ...
0
votes
1answer
150 views

Are these sentences in the “Christian Science Monitor” acceptable English these days? [closed]

This is from a Christian Science Monitor story on Nancy Pelosi's decision to stay on as House Minority Leader. The first report I saw in the Washington Post had only one questionable sentence, but ...
3
votes
3answers
883 views

Is “five-yearly” an acceptable usage of an adverb of manner in British English?

Today's BBC News web page has this headline: New era of five-yearly doctor checks starts There's a word that means "five-yearly": quinquennial. It's probably too long for headline writers and ...
3
votes
2answers
561 views

Can the phrase “be necessary to” only be used on people?

My teacher told me that the phrase be necessary to can be used only on people. For example, Something is necessary to someone. Assuming she is correct, then this following sentence, the one I ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Alleged misuse of the word 'respective'

I was told I misused the word respective in the sentence 'If bilingual, please list the respective languages.' My understanding is that the word points to the prior mentioned subjects. Here's a ...
3
votes
1answer
259 views

What articles can I use with “maximum/minimum [noun]”?

There's a short piece of text whose heading is as follows: Maximum variability and openness The variability and openness should refer to the features of an application. Which article ...
11
votes
5answers
4k views

Morbid curiosity about “more better”

I have a grammatical question regarding one of the worst pieces of grammar imaginable. One of my students made the argument that better things could be considered a single item. Is it possible for the ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Usage of “(in)capable”

I read the following question on meta: Questions incapable of a simple answer Now I am confused: Is that a possible correct usage of "(in)capable"? Can a question be capable of an answer? Wouldn't ...
3
votes
3answers
597 views

Alternative phrase to “highly paid job”

James: I make 10000 USD a month. Alice: Wow, you have a highly paid job. Is the phrase “highly paid job” correct? I think yes, but also wish to ask the native speakers here. I assume that ...
1
vote
2answers
293 views

“Time elapsed” or “elapsed time” [closed]

In a document I have a plot where one of the labels represents the total time taken for the process to complete. Should I label it as "Elapsed Time" or "Time Elapsed"? Which one is correct?
6
votes
7answers
7k views

Is “baddest” a proper word?

I just came across this documentary: The World's Biggest & Baddest Bugs by Animal Planet Is "baddest" a proper word? Shouldn't it be "worst"? What is going on here?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Enthused” vs. “enthusiastic” [closed]

Is it grammatically correct to say "I was enthused" rather than "I was enthusiastic"? If so, what is the difference between the two?
0
votes
0answers
116 views

Grammaticality of “that that” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem “I don't think that that can be done” Better use of “that that” — or not ...
5
votes
3answers
401 views

“An abandoned cute little kitten” or “a cute abandoned little kitten” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? I saw an abandoned cute little kitten. I saw a cute abandoned little kitten. Which sentence is correct? What is the ...
2
votes
5answers
189 views

Can the word “unsolicited” be used as a verb?

Consider the following: He replied to us even when not solicited/asked. Can not solicited be replaced with unsolicited?
8
votes
5answers
785 views

Use of “The better”?

Disclamer: English isn't my first language. I learned during my English courses (a few years ago), that there is, as in French (which is my first language), a comparative and superlative version for ...
4
votes
2answers
526 views

Is the phrase “the alive animal” grammatically correct?

Is it wrong to use the phrase "The alive animal"? Is it alright to say, "The animal was alive."?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Can an adjective follow dynamic verbs (“leave”, “declare”)?

I know that an adjective can come after some verbs, such as: be, become, feel, get, look, seem, smell, sound. These verbs are "stative" verbs, which express a state or change of state. For example: ...
0
votes
2answers
323 views

“New diagnosed” vs. “newly diagnosed” [closed]

Which one of the following is correct to use? New diagnosed cases. Newly diagnosed cases.
0
votes
0answers
51 views

The use of “bad” vs the use of “badly.” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” Which of the following is more grammatically correct? I feel bad for her. or I feel ...
1
vote
4answers
4k views

Is it correct to say something is “suitable/fit for” somebody?

For instance: This sport is suitable/fit for me. This game is too violent. It is not suitable/fit for me. I moved to south. The climate there was not suitable/fit for me. This woman is ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“overly confident” vs “over confident”

I hear or read both phrases regularly, and they seem to have the same meaning to me. But do they have different meanings? Or is “overly confident” even grammatically correct?
2
votes
4answers
6k views

“Old days” or “olden days”?

Sometimes I use the phrase "back in the old days". I was recently in a class where the trainer kept using the phrase "olden days." Which usage is acceptable?