0
votes
1answer
23 views

Which is correct? 'Education college' or 'educational college'?

I don't know which is correct, and it confuses me the more I learn the English language. We all know that educational is an adjective, so if I had to choose one, I would definitely choose educational ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
4
votes
3answers
148 views

Comparative or superlative to describe a quality of a member of a set of two things?

For example, 'he's the bigger of the two guards' or 'he's the biggest of the two guards'? The comparative indicates that something is bigger/more difficult than another member. If there's only two ...
0
votes
3answers
76 views

“I want [pronoun] [adjective]” vs “I want [pronoun] to be [adjective]”

Take these two sentences. 1.I want him dead. 2.I want him to be dead. What is the differences between two sentences? What does the "to be" mean?
15
votes
6answers
2k views

Using “so” and “very” for ungradable adjectives

We generally use modifiers such as "so" and "very" for gradable/normal adjectives (water can be quite/so/very HOT, but not quite/so/very BOILING (an ungradable/extreme adjective). Yet would you say ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Are commas necessary between coordinate adjectives? [duplicate]

to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iranˈs nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful. As I see, in the noun phrase a mutually-agreed long-term ...
1
vote
4answers
61 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
2
votes
2answers
108 views

determiner “the” followed by adjective - parts of speech

In English, adjectives usually cannot function as noun or pronouns, at least not to the degree it is possible in German where you can do it without thinking. The old car sucked. The new is better. ...
4
votes
2answers
410 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

From a grammatical point of view, how is “Star” in Star Wars being used? [duplicate]

What is the grammatical term for the way the word "star" is used in the name Star Wars? Some non-English speakers are concerned that more than one star is implied in the concept and therefore the name ...
1
vote
2answers
599 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
0
votes
1answer
264 views

Usage of “other” with singular nouns

Reading an English textbook and learning stuff, they mention that that "other" is used only with plural or uncountable nouns. But what about this? There is no other way..no other option. Car ends ...
0
votes
1answer
122 views

Which can be true? The importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun

I am confused about the sentence below. Which structure is used: importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun ? In recently years, there has been growing awareness of the importance of ...
1
vote
4answers
684 views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
-2
votes
3answers
4k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
3
votes
2answers
218 views

What's the logic behind adjectives constructed with a hyphen?

I'll give you a lovecraftian stanza: Thro’ the ghoul-guarded gateways of slumber, Past the wan-moon’d abysses of night, I have liv’d o’er my lives without number, I have sounded all things ...
-1
votes
2answers
254 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
0
votes
1answer
320 views

Can “above” be used as an adjective? [duplicate]

I've read in some English grammar books that the word above can only act as an adverb. It can never be used as an adjective in any context. For example: 1) The above example explains it well. ...
0
votes
2answers
311 views

multiple adjectives next to each other [closed]

In low volume, a melody sad love song is playing in a mobile phone placed on the side table. Do you see the three adjectives (melody sad love) together? Is that correct?
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “I'm being angry” ungrammatical?

I am arguing with friends about this question. According to what I learned in school, there are some adjectives that cannot be used in the progressive form. I think this one is ungrammatical because ...
-1
votes
2answers
118 views

Using “meantime” as an adjective

Does it make sense to say: Please consider this email as a meantime brief report. If yes, why? and if no, how can it be fixed? Edit By the above sentence, I want to say that this email is not ...
-5
votes
1answer
91 views

“Bongo is screaming”: is “screaming” an adjective? [closed]

If I say, "Bongo is screaming", would screaming be an adjective?
2
votes
3answers
913 views

What is the difference between “skilled” and “skillful”?

What is the difference between skilled and skillful? When can I use one, when can I used the other? He is skilled/​skillful. He is a skilled/​skillful musician. (Anything else?) From the ...
1
vote
2answers
284 views

Which of these is the correct use of this phrase

I frequently encounter this in technical documents and I am wondering which one is correct. In the figure below or In the below figure
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Is the phrase “fresh six muffins” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? A non-native speaker that I know always puts the count before another adjective, as in "fresh six muffins". "Six fresh muffins" ...
1
vote
1answer
546 views

How to identify adjectives [closed]

I’m revisiting/studying about adjectives in “Adjectives” at Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing. First I learn that articles are adjectives, but then there follows a paragraph in ...
32
votes
5answers
3k views

Is “the girls are want to gossip” correct?

Is this the correct use and placement of want? The girls in the office are want to gossip. Does anyone have a reference citing this use?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Word for the “strength” of an adjective

Is there a word which describes the strength of an adjective within an ordered set? For example, these words describe “quality” in ascending order of their “power”: good great fantastic Is there ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Use of determiners as adjectives

In a grammar book that I'm reading, an adjective is defined as: A word that modifies a noun or a pronoun. (To modify is to limit or point out or describe: that book; another chance; the blue ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Super-duper ultra mega”

Can I use the adjectives super-duper, ultra, and mega in one adjective? For example, A super-duper ultra mega huge dome.
0
votes
1answer
288 views

Can the word 'freed' be used as an adjective? [closed]

For example: "Freed memory can be reused by another computer programs"?
2
votes
1answer
334 views

What's it called when you make an adjective post-positive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? In English, adjectives usually precede the nouns they describe, as in "organic carrots". However, in some cases ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
1
vote
2answers
10k views

How to use the words ending with “-ly”?

First question: in the grammar world, where do the -ly ended words belong? Second question: how to use them correctly? Rarely (oops!), if ever, I get myself using -ly ended words in my writing. I'm ...
5
votes
3answers
616 views

Adjectives that do not have predicative position

I've read somewhere that some adjectives cannot be used in the predicative position; for example "this is a major problem" is acceptable, but "the problem is major" is not acceptable. I'm wondering ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

“Simpler” or “More Simple” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” Which of these two terms is correct? If they are both ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

When is the use of “north” more appropriate than “northern” and vice versa?

North, South, East, West, can be used as adjectives, but so can Northern, Southern, Eastern, Western. What rules, if any, govern which is appropriate when?
2
votes
1answer
11k views

Article when there is an adjective before a noun [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” When to use a or an before a noun when there are adjectives before that noun? like the following example: An operator ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is an adjectival complement in English?

How can one determine what an adjectival complement is in an English sentence? Are there are any subcategories to this classification? I'd love concrete examples, to help me better understand this ...
4
votes
3answers
955 views

Can adjectives always be used as nouns when they denote a plural and are preceded by the definite article?

An adjective appears to be used as a noun when denoting an animate plural and preceded by the definite article: 'The successful are those who strive.' 'The foolish are those who ...
2
votes
2answers
462 views

How would you name these two different types of adjectival qualifying?

If I say "Max is quite joyful right now" that would mean that Max is experiencing a feeling of joy, right? But if I say "This needle is rather painful" that would mean that somebody else is ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Intimate and Intimate

I was thinking about the "intimate" word used here: How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend? How can I differentiate both words? Edit: in response to comments, I don't quite ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

“My another account” vs. “my other account”

A little debate going on here so I just want to know which one it is; I'm saying it's my other account since my another would be my one other account. The other person insists they both can be used; ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“One-Day Only Promotion” or “One-Day-Only Promotion”

A copywriter I'm working with wrote "One-Day Only Promotion" but my feeling is that "One-Day-Only Promotion" is correct. The first three words describe 'Promotion'. I know you don't hyphenate adverbs, ...
2
votes
1answer
798 views

Two adjectives for two nouns

I saw this on a billboard recently We have new and pre-owned cars and trucks Clearly the intention is to modify "cars and trucks" with the two adjectives "used and preowned" and although the ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Why are words such as “that” and “those” not considered articles?

According to Wikipedia (disclaimer: of course I realize that Wikipedia should not be regarded as an absolute authority, but I generally consider it to be a fairly accurate and reliable resource): ...
8
votes
2answers
310 views

Chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped?

Is it chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped? And with what kind of former words to use "-" properly?
12
votes
4answers
8k views

Should I use “ related” or “-related”

What is the correct use of the term "related?" For example, should I use it like computer related, or is it more proper to use computer-related (where the word "computer" is just part of my ...