1
vote
0answers
36 views

Words describing extent/ degree of 'jeopardy?' [on hold]

I am writing a letter to describe the future of a country is in serious jeopardy, in the sense that all cultures, economies, rules of games and so on will be lost in a second. Which adjectives I can ...
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

“Putative” vs. “surrogate” [closed]

How similar or different is "putative" to "surrogate"? The term "surrogate father" is common, "putative father" is fairly so, too. But what may be the difference in connotation?
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
2
votes
2answers
213 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
0
votes
3answers
209 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
2
votes
2answers
263 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

'Blowback' with 'much'

Jawad Sukhanyar & Rod Nordland, In Prison Release, Signs of Karzai’s Rift With U.S. (NYT): The amount of people advocating for a long-term relationship with Afghanistan is pretty small in ...
2
votes
2answers
231 views

“Brunette” vs. “brown” and “blonde” vs. “yellow”

Why is that we never use these terms interchangeably? I.e. one wouldn't say "I've painted my walls a deep brunette". Why is it that "brunette" and "blonde" are used exclusively in reference to hair ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

“desert island” versus “deserted island”

What is the difference between "a desert island" and "a deserted island"? Are they synonyms?
0
votes
2answers
141 views

What is a better antonym pair than “upmost” vs. “deepest” for blood vessels?

I’m thinking about the opposite ends of a blood vessel, so perhaps the “upmost” blood vessels and “deepest” blood vessels. My problem is that I like neither word quoted in the previous sentence. ...
5
votes
5answers
323 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
3
votes
2answers
726 views

“High aspirations” vs. “large aspirations”

When you intend to say someone has a strong desire to achieve something high or great, is it proper to say they have "high aspirations"? Or would it be "large aspirations", or something else?
-1
votes
2answers
83 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
4
votes
3answers
10k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
0
votes
2answers
63 views

“Delinquent” to describe something non-monetary

Can delinquent be used to describe something like a school assignment? You still have some delinquent assignments. Or does the word only apply to monetary matters?
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
0
votes
2answers
205 views

“The distance is great” vs. “high” vs. “large”

I don't want to change the structure of the sentence. So please tell me which adjective works better in this sentence — great, high or large. Due to the resolution of cameras, vehicles are not ...
0
votes
4answers
160 views

Electrical/electric [duplicate]

Which is correct: Electric power engineering student Electrical power engineering student
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Usage of “convivial”

Is "convivial" a formal and uncommon word? Can I say "a convivial community"?
0
votes
3answers
76 views

“Hospitable transition”

In a resignation letter, would it be right to say: Please let me know how I can assist to make a hospitable transition. Specifically, does the combination "hospitable transition" make sense in ...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water”

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“The later part of the 20th century” vs. “the latter part of the 20th century”

For the sentence fragment: "...during the later part of the 20th century" using "latter" sounds better to me: "...during the latter part of the 20th century" But most websites I find have ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Proper adjective to use with the word “chance” (“low”, “small”, “slim”, etc.)

What is the proper adjective to use with the word chance? Can chance be low, small, slim? What would be your suggestion?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammaticality of “a high number of”

Is the phrase "a high number of" considered correct? Or is it only correct to say "a large number of"? Example: Japan has a high number of active volcanoes.
1
vote
2answers
202 views

“Offence threat” vs. “offensive threat”

I was watching an NBA game. After Omer Asik missed an easy shot, the commentator said that Omer was not much of an offensive threat. I used to say offence threat often. Which usage is more established ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

“Large amount of calories” vs. “high amount of calories”

Is it more typical to say that there are a large amount of calories or a high amount of calories? For example: Chocolate cake contains a high/large amount of calories.
1
vote
1answer
889 views

Is there a difference between “depressive” and “depressing”?

Is news depressing or depressive? In what situations would you use these two words? According to dicionary.com: depressive - tending to depress depressing - serving to depress; inducing a ...
0
votes
1answer
163 views

Is “low physique” idiomatic?

Is "low physique" idiomatic? If not, what is the adjective to be used with physique?
2
votes
0answers
3k views

“Particular” vs. “specific” [closed]

The Free Dictionary lists particular and specific as synonyms, but there still seems to be a subtle distinction between the two. What is that distinction? In a phrase along the lines of: the ...
4
votes
2answers
830 views

Is “sound approach” an accepted phrase?

English is not my first language, and in my language (Bosnian) we write just as we speak ; so from time to time, I encounter phrases which I know I have heard before, but am not sure if I am writing ...
10
votes
3answers
5k views

“Quick question” vs. “short question”

Which one would you prefer: "quick question" or "short question" for a question that you know is simple and will only take a moment to answer? Or maybe "simple question"? The problem I have with ...
2
votes
3answers
282 views

“Broad surface” or “large surface” [closed]

When comparing the total surface area of (geometrical) bodies, can I describe it as "large surface" (or "largest") or, as an editor suggested, do I have to use "broad surface"? Edit: Example ...
0
votes
4answers
498 views

What is the correct word to describe a turn or a bend — “hard”, “sharp”, “heavy”…?

If there is a very sharp turn or detour or bend — in a piece of plastic, for example, — what is the correct word to describe it (hard, sharp, heavy...)?
-1
votes
4answers
2k views

“Big budget” vs. “large budget” — which one to use? [closed]

What is the difference between big and large? I am trying to use one of these words but I'm skeptical which one is the right one. The context I intend to use one of these words in is: Small ...
12
votes
4answers
97k views

What is the difference between “sardonic” and “sarcastic”?

Basically, sardonic and sarcastic both stand for mocking gestures, but what is the difference in their contextual use? Are there any other words that represent a similar gesture?