Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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1answer
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When do words like “Rewirable” keep the 'e' from “Rewire”?

I was spelling "rewirable" earlier and could've sworn it should be spelled 'rewireable' but google said otherwise. Whats the deal here? I never paid a lot of attention in my english classes ...
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0answers
19 views

Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?

I've been trying to figure out if this slogan requires a comma: Simple, streaming music. versus Simple streaming music I did some reading on comma rules here and here, but I'm still a bit ...
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2answers
32 views

An appropriate adjective

I am writing a report and it should tell all the stakeholders that "the target for all product categories, including Over Payments to customers has either been met or exceeded (by a very small ...
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26 views

alternative to “high depth”, “large depth”

After having used "high depth" in a report, I consider it now almost as an oxymoron. But, is "large depth" better English? What would be an alternative adjective? (I'm not looking for the abyss as I ...
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2answers
79 views

An adjective for gestalt

Is there an adjective to describe someone with the ability to quickly grasp/see the whole picture out of a few perceived details. This person is not detail-oriented and never fails to see the forest ...
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5answers
44 views

What kind of character does a person who makes loud exclamations have?

Here, I am trying to find an adjective to describe a (relatively poor) person who is open but attracts a lot of attention (not attention-seeking though). As an example, I found this video: ...
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1answer
26 views

Should it be written due date or date due?

Is it better to write: Please pay by due date or Please pay by date due?
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1answer
46 views

What comes first—verb or adverb? [duplicate]

Do you say, to effectively communicate or would you say to communicate effectively. As ENL learner I get this confused quite often. Thanks.
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3answers
62 views

I can make it, I will leave. What's the precedence and ambiguity?

Here's a scenario. I am confounded when after a discussion with a friend, they arrive at my place on Saturday, here's the transcript. her: I can make it on Saturday. me: Ok, see you then anytime! ...
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0answers
44 views

“Programatically” v.s. “Pragmatically” [closed]

Whenever I need to express the fact that I need to express some process in terms of code, I generally use the word pragmatic. For example: How can I extract the markdown tags that a website uses ...
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1answer
33 views

adjectives and past participles used as nouns [duplicate]

In general, 'the + adjective' and 'the + past participle' could be used instead of a plural noun phrase. The good die young. The damned will bury the dead. I think in certain cases that ...
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4answers
86 views

A proper substitute to “highly reactive” [closed]

I have to use the expression " highly reactive" a lot in my everyday writings. Can there be another word or phrase to put it better and which still connotes the correct meaning. Plutonium is a ...
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0answers
21 views

Forming adjectives via suffixes, exhaustive approach [migrated]

My word is for postfixes (they call them suffixes) forming adjectives, very often I face missing English counterparts speaking of rich in adjectives (they are formed easily with almost no snobbish ...
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1answer
34 views

Adjectives with verbs: when do I need a comma? [closed]

I was always told to use the adverb with the verb, and not the verb with the adjective. "I walk slowly" Not "I walk slow" But I can add a comma and say: "I walk, slow". But in my dictionary I ...
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2answers
50 views

when differences stand in the way of further contact

What is a good adjective for differences when they stand in the way of people continuing seeing each other? in a sentence: "The differences are to '[adjective]' for them to continue to meet." or ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Adjectives that Imply Nouns [closed]

Often we may see adjectives with nouns that are implied, but not explicitly written. I see this mostly with sports team names and demonyms. For example: The Notre Dame Fighting Irish Is "Irish" a ...
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3answers
128 views

Reducing multiple “enoughs” as in a sentence

Writing "enough" three times in such a short sentence seems too repetitive. So is there a different or more succinct way to write it? Horrible example sentence: I am drunk enough, fast enough and ...
2
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1answer
61 views

What is the meaning of “primarian”?

I'm translating an interview of two musicians. At certain moment, discussing jokes hidden in lyrics, one of the speakers says "I think there's always been a couple of jokes in my work. It's not a ...
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0answers
52 views

“Oxford” comma with adjectives

Suppose you have some coordinate adjectives modifying a noun. E.g. "the cold, tired, hungry dog." You could rewrite this as "the cold and tired and hungry dog" but would these "the ...
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6answers
133 views

A word for not wanting to talk much

What is a word for when someone speaks or answers you using single words like "yes", "okay", or "probably", but your questions are sensible enough to base a conversation on?
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1answer
36 views

you’re more than due a vacation - due without for?

I do not understand how this sentence makes sense: you’re more than due a vacation Should it not be "due for"? If not, why? What dictionary entry (e.g. Oxford) would that be?
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1answer
41 views

Meaning of “drawn by hunger and pride” when describing a face

When Rayber had first opened the door in the middle of the night and had seen Tarwater's face - white, drawn by some unfathomable hunger and pride - he had remained for an instant frozen before ...
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16answers
4k views

What do you call an individual who tolerates criticism?

Is there an English word to refer to someone who tolerates (or welcomes, accepts) criticism given about them? Is there an adjective to use for such a person?
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0answers
4 views

adjective applied to several noun [migrated]

How appropiate is in English the use of a single adjective to modify several nouns? exemple: Can we say: different places and orientations instead of different places and different orientations? ...
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3answers
90 views

Term for numbers that have at least one non-zero significant digit after the decimal point?

So, a number that is nothing but fractions is "fractional". A number that has a whole number and a fraction is "mixed", if you want to call it that. And the portion after the decimal point is called ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
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16answers
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English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?

I am looking for a word that means “a process that you keep doing, hoping that you will learn something useful, but which you actually never learn anything from”. I'm quite sure that there is an ...
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1answer
45 views

Why are some “-ist” suffixed words used as the adjective form over the more common “-istic”?

Generally speaking, for any kind of "-ism", the suffix "-ist" produces the noun form and "-istic" produces the adjective form. But there are some "-ist" suffixes that are acceptable or even more ...
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1answer
55 views

Adjectival form of “library”

I can only think of librarily and librarish. Can I use those? Are there other better alternatives? Example: The topic of this book isn't very "[...]". I don't think you should donate it.
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2answers
60 views

“identical with” vs. “identical to”

I find myself always wondering which is the grammatically correct expression or, provided that both are correct, whether there are differences between their meaning. One example: Passage A in this ...
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2answers
47 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
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1answer
38 views

What's the proper way: Forever Lucky, or Lucky Forever? [closed]

The title says it all, what's the proper way to say it? Also, could you please explain me the why one is the right form, and the other is the wrong form? Thanks.
3
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3answers
82 views

“Attendant with” vs. “attendant to” vs. “attendant of”

Can the adjective attendant be used with the prepositions with, to, or of, and, if so, which is preferable? For example, I could say, "This manual describes the operation of the product and its ...
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6answers
117 views

Adjective for “something in which you always find something new”

Or alternatively, "something in which you're always able to find/discover something new". An example: A book, which you read multiple times, and every time you read it, you see a whole new aspect ...
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6answers
4k views

Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?

"My female cousin working for a finance company was dismissed. Disappeared along with her job were her confidence and smiling face." There is a very complicated system in Chinese for naming ...
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4answers
53 views

Looking for adjective - classic word for devoid of embellishment

I recall coming across a word in an article that just spoke to me and described my approach to creativity. The context it was written in referred to a creative piece devoid of unnecessary ...
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2answers
56 views

What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?

For example: `Form A` is able to anticipate any kind of input. Like, can take in Japanese characters, block illegal characters, and any other sort of characters. Hence, `Form A` is _____ble. ...
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5answers
113 views

word for: someone who does not share or like to share easily [closed]

I am looking for a word a friend used the other day to describe people who do not share easily. They need to be asked repeatedly not because its a secret but simply because they cannot or do not want ...
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10answers
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Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged? [closed]

Most grammar checkers are capable of detecting the the misuse of "your" and "you're"; providing the necessary correction. I'm curious though, is there any sentence that can be constructed where ...
3
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2answers
182 views

Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts [duplicate]

What determines whether something is a "noun adjunct" or just a garden-variety adjective? Does it matter in any meaningful way? Here is my hypothesis, but I can't find any authoritative source to ...
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5answers
703 views

Parts of speech and functions: “Bob made a book collector happy the other day”

Having been bamboozled by various questions and answers on this site, I'd like to know what are the parts of speech (POS) and grammatical functions of the words and phrases in the following sentence: ...
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2answers
93 views

What's the opposite of hypochondriacal?

A hypochondriacal person is someone who is excessively preoccupied with and worried about his or her health. Is there a term for the other end of the spectrum --somebody extremely carefree, ...
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2answers
58 views

Equivalent of words appropriate to damage for healing [closed]

I'm creating a game and in it, it is possible to damage or heal living things, as you would expect. I've decided that different kinds of things can have one of three reactions to certain types of ...
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7answers
3k views

Treacle is viscous; alcohol is ____?

What's the best adjective to describe the low viscosity of liquids such as water and alcohol? One that came to mind is 'runny', but then some honeys are runny, despite actually being inherently ...
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1answer
36 views

The order of noun-modification patterns in IT

For example: The field Media/Media field contains all necessary information about the content. The Address section/section Address is located in the lower section of the window. Does the right ...
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1answer
138 views

Why does English have a word for pink? [closed]

We have a word for light red (pink), but not light blue. Why is this? Russian, for example, has specific words for light and dark blue.
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2answers
74 views

which adjective should i use for family of someone [closed]

I want to write a happy new year letter for someone(not very close, business partner) what adjective should i use in regard to his family for example : Dear Family , respectful family , beloved family ...
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1answer
64 views

Plural adjective not followed by noun [closed]

Here is my sentence Hughes writes in a style in which phonetics and stress are not fully working in tandem Can I be understood here, and is it grammatically correct? phonetic fəˈnɛtɪk ...
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4answers
329 views

What do you call a person who thinks a lot?

Is there any specific word for a person who is always involved in processing a thought? I could find synonyms for 'deep thought' - contemplation, rumination and so on. But I couldn't find if there ...
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15answers
3k views

A word for: someone who is easy to talk to

I want to convey the idea that such and such person is very easy to talk to. I know that: 'talk to-able' is not a word, obviously. I can always say, "He is very easy to talk to." But I am looking ...