Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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27 views

in danger / an adverb or an adjective?

how are you all? I'd ask about this word "in danger", is it an adverb or an adjective ? Why? I hope I find the answer of my question. Did I make mistakes in this piece of writing? Enjoy your time ...
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2answers
28 views

Noun or adjective required

What would be correct? I am standing at 100 feet high, or I am standing at 100 feet height. Thank you!
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1answer
55 views

A turned on or off car?

Will these expressions sound natural (to native English speakers)? Any better way to say: 1 - A turned on car 2 - A turned off car 3 - An idling car 4 - An idled car 5 - The car is turned off 6 ...
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2answers
52 views

What are the appropriate adjective and verb that match “load”?

Hello, everyone. I want to ask a question a little related with the computer. Suppose the requests from the users are shared by more servers as we have deployed more servers. Thus every server ...
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2answers
33 views

Difference between 'Educational' and 'Education' system

As a non-native-speeker, I'm having difficulties to understand difference between 'Education system' and 'Educational system'? Is 'Educational system' appropriate at all?
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0answers
22 views

Describing word [on hold]

"I am writing an essay. I wanted to know what word should I use to describe someone who like to prove points about something, and always want to be right."
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3answers
41 views

Collective term for physical as opposed to virtual (digital) destinations

I am looking for a word or phrase that encapsulates the following collection of nouns in the sense that they are all physical, proper entities, and that you can go inside them: Words that apply to ...
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8answers
9k views

Oil is slippery; rubber is _____?

What's the best word (or words) to describe rubber's 'gripping' property that is the opposite of oil's slipperiness? It's not 'rough', since rubber grips without necessarily being rough.
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1answer
41 views

Self-Employed or Freelance

I'm re-writing my CV and am unsure which adjective to use, Self-Employed or Freelance. What is the difference (if any) between the two?
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3answers
101 views

Are there cases where it is correct to use “more” with a monosyllabic adjective?

In general, it appears monosyllabic adjectives in English form the comparative by the -er suffix. Are there any cases where a monosyllabic adjective can be preceded by more but still be grammatical ...
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5answers
112 views

Adjective that simultaneously means fearless and hopeless? [closed]

I'm looking for an adjective or a noun that simultaneously means fearless and hopeless. A word x, such that x = fearless + hopeless? To elaborate, x is a feeling. I know I will die today and that ...
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6answers
64 views

Is “agnostic” an appropriate substitute for “indifferent”?

Recently, a co-worker used the term agnostic to indicate that he had no strong preference for either of the two options under consideration. I don't remember exactly what the discussion was about, but ...
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10answers
2k views

Adjective that means “snake-like”

If bovine means related to the cow or ox, what is the word that means related to the snake?
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31 views

A phrase with adjective + noun

I am following some repositories. (I am a programmer). I want to call them "followed repositories". Is that correct?
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2answers
90 views

Words for describing an events start time

I am trying to classify events into two distinct groups. Event, in this context, means a public event which people might go to. This includes a broad collection of things including concerts, plays, ...
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1answer
40 views

Is correct expression “gone her/him/me”?

I've watched the movie "gone girl". However, I thought that how about "gone her". Then, I'm not sure that correct English expression "gone her". There is the move title, "Despicable me". That word is ...
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3answers
87 views

Does the phrase “espoused narrative” make sense?

Recently I've been told my usage of this term is incorrect, but I've seen it being used often enough. Context I've pulled from google "This may well also allow the EU to illegitimate these ...
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0answers
56 views

Adjective after instead

The study described in the article shows that implementation of dynamic LED boards doesn’t show a clear increase in traffic flow at the bottleneck before congestions, probably because the LED ...
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2answers
47 views

In search of a word: Contingent but without fail

I'm in search of a certain word which I cannot find in the dictionary or the internet, but I found something like it. The word is contingent. con·tin·gent (kn-tnjnt) adj. Liable to ...
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1answer
21 views

“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...
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1answer
46 views

What's a word for running away from who you are? [closed]

The word being sought indicates not accepting who you are so that you try and run from it, hide from it, create a fantasy world to mask reality.
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1answer
109 views

is 'the' an adjective? Please tell [closed]

I've looked it up in Hindi dictionary that tells me that 'the' is an adjective. I googled but couldn't get that is an adjective
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0answers
27 views

Past simple and Simple past

We can say both. Why ? "Simple past" seems to be the grammatically correct one (adjective first) but "Past simple" is the one we do use... Is there a reason ?
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3answers
82 views

order of adjectives - deleted recent questions vs recent deleted questions

From what is introduced here, "recent" is a kind of age and "deleted" seems to be a kind of specific opinion, so this structure seems to be correct: "deleted recent questions". Actually I was ...
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1answer
77 views

What is the word “funny” modifying in this sentence?

I don’t understand why Daniella is acting so funny. Is funny modifiying Daniella (which would make it an adjective) or is it modifying acting (making it an adverb)? Is there any way to tell ...
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1answer
55 views

An old-fashioned synonym for “arrogant” and “thinking too high of oneself”

I can't remember this idiom which I once heard and means "arrogant". As I haven't heard it for a long time, say some 30 years, I presume it is outdated. It's a two-word idiom and sounds somewhat ...
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3answers
83 views

“Lighter” vs. “brighter”

I'm trying to find information about the grammatical correctness of interchanging lighter and brighter in the sense of: I turned on the lamp and the room became lighter. I turned on the lamp ...
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1answer
58 views

What quality describes “degree of concentration of wealth”?

Suppose I wish to propose a challenge to quantify the "degree of concentration of wealth" as it pertains to "rep" on various Stack Exchange boards. The measure being used, the Gini index, is formally ...
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1answer
82 views

single word for “positive attribute” [closed]

What is a single word that means 'positive attribute'? Possibly an antonym for "shortcoming." I need this word to describe some of the good features of a neighborhood. Maybe "features" is the word? ...
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2answers
74 views

A word describes the person who tends to stereotype people

Is there a word/adjective (single word) that describes the person who likes consiously or uncousiously to stereotype people? I was thinking that there might be a word such as stereotypist, but such a ...
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3answers
171 views

Is there a single word for “not pregnant”?

Is there a single word that is the antonym for "pregnant" to describe someone "not pregnant"?
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1answer
42 views

Definition relating to geometry [closed]

What word in geometry that describes angles has a meaning outside geometry that means strange or odd ?
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2answers
98 views

Disoriented vs. Disorientated [duplicate]

In the U.S., we seemingly prefer the former to the latter. However, I was sitting with my friends when one of them stated that he was "disorientated" while we were playing a video game. My theory, at ...
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5answers
174 views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
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2answers
44 views

how to reduce an adjective clause

He is an artist who makes sculptures Reduced adjective clause: He is an artist making sculptures Is there any rule to rephrase as it should be? thanks!
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80 views

“Inconvenient” vs. “uncomfortable” [closed]

Which of the following is correct? It's uncomfortable to live there due to poor housing conditions. It's inconvenient to live there due to poor housing conditions.
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6answers
304 views

What's the English for the Italian 'materico'?

Speaking about contemporary art, I often use the adjective 'materico' to describe the quality of a painting realized with thick layers of colour. It is not simply a question of thickness. In the art ...
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3answers
213 views

Word for “having characteristics of the beach?”

The city had a tropical, [...] feeling to it. I thought of the word beachy but I worry people will confuse it with the other similar-sounding word.
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1answer
73 views

On the Existence of the Word 'Grousily'

Is 'grousily' a word? I would like to use it in a sentence to mean 'grumpily, as if in imitation of a rumpled grouse' but don't think it's okay because of how I couldn't find it in either OS X's ...
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5answers
729 views

Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
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1answer
81 views

Curious words that make me suspicious

I'm curious about that curious object. I'm suspicious of that suspicious stranger. I'm dubious about that dubious plan. I can't think of any other words that allow this: using the same ...
3
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2answers
129 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
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1answer
38 views

Are “a perfect fool”, “a proper fool” and “a precious fool” the same kind of “fool”?

Is there any (subtle) difference in meaning and usage when these adjectives qualify "a fool"? Are these adjectives perfectly interchangeable "A precious fool I would look, if I did that." "The ...
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3answers
338 views

The horribility of English language

Pretty much every adjective that ends in the suffix -able or -ible gives rise to a related noun: corruptible becomes corruptibility mutable becomes mutability respectable becomes respectability ...
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1answer
92 views

Is there a difference between negligible and neglectable?

According to wiktionary.org they are synonyms. However, most words have a slight difference in the way or in which context they are used. I would like to know those differences. For example, when one ...
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1answer
67 views

Why “Be quiet!” may sound as “Be quiets!” [closed]

I guess "(Everyone) Be quiet!" referring to a group of people is correct. But it may sound as "Be quiets!" when they yell. Is it correct?
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1answer
30 views

How to phrase this statement with two time related adjectives? [closed]

I'm trying to say: "These are the current future plans for the project." I'm highlighting the current plans I have for the project that I'd like to do in the future. This doesn't seem to be correct ...
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4answers
509 views

Can I write “ The bag is black colour?”

We know that "The bag is black." is a correct sentence. But, a lot of people write "the bag is black colour". Is this sentence grammatically wrong or acceptable?
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2answers
55 views

When is the word “prohibited” a verb and when is it a predicate adjective?

Smoking is prohibited here. Using the drug is prohibited in the game. Is the word prohibited in both sentences above a verb, predicate adjective, or both? Kindly enlighten me with this. Thank you! ...
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104 views

Adjective meaning stubborn or willfully ignorant, to one's detriment

I'm a writing a letter that goes: Your correspondent John Smith is correct that exercise has its costs, both in terms of cost of food and cost of equipment and gym memberships. However, to argue ...