Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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What's the word for 'new yet old'? [on hold]

I am trying to think of the word that describes something that is new yet old, contemporary yet classic, progressive yet traditional or any other similar meanings. Any help would be greatly ...
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0answers
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Negative Comparatives & Superlatives

An Adjective can, in general, be converted to Comparative (-er) & Superlative (-est) ; for example : good better best happy happier happiest Now Superlative means "Highest in quality", ...
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Fictional vs. Fiction

I apologize in advance if my question has been asked before: there's this club I know called the "Fiction Film Club", and while I know it's used here to specify what kind of film and that sometimes ...
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21answers
5k views

Adjective describing a person who has lots of children, not “fertile”

Is there a single adjective that means "this person has lots of children"? Context: I'm not actually talking about a person. I'm talking about a data structure in a computer program, where objects ...
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1answer
48 views

Is it correct to say “I think sth important”?

I know that I can say: I consider this idea important. I deem this film stupid. I regard my health as important. But can I say: I think money/health/love/etc. important. Or does it ...
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1answer
52 views

Is “soliciting” in the example sentence an adjective or a noun? [closed]

In the following sentence, I would like to understand if the word "soliciting" is a noun or an adjective. "Is my reluctance that soliciting?" Here, the word "soliciting" appears to be a kind of ...
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2answers
45 views

Use of “play” followed by an adjective

English is my second language so there are a lot of new things to me. I just came across several sentences containing the phrases "play dead", "play sick" and "play cute" so I wonder if the verb ...
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1answer
30 views

How should I join the following sentence so it becomes an adjective?

Wow, that was the most philosophical I-don't-care-that-you're-not-a-virgin explanation I've ever heard. Should I write it like this? Or should I omit some words?
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1answer
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Analyzing 'as' in ascertain, assure, etc

It seems that in some words, like in the word 'ascertain' or in 'assure', the 'a' or the combination of 'a' and 's' transforms the adjective into a verb. My question is, is there a term in the ...
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1answer
61 views

Abdominal; Why isn't it 'abdomenal' (with an 'e'), and is there a name for such words?

Why is the word 'abdominal' formed of an altered spelling of 'abdomen'? I have noticed other words similar, but none spring to mind; is there a name for them?
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1answer
31 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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21answers
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Is there a word that means cheating but legitimate?

Is there a word that means cheating and legitimate at the same time? For example: I play a quiz game and set the number of questions to one. So, I get 100% of my answers correct. That's cheating, ...
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8answers
132 views

Antonym: “repetitive”

Let's say there's a video game that never gets boring no matter how much you play it, because there's always something new to do in it. What would be a term to describe the game? The opposite would ...
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1answer
52 views

“Undersize” as an adjective? Where did the “d” go?

As I was reading this article, I came across the word "undersize" being used three separate times as an adjective. I was confused, as I don't think I've ever seen that word used that way before (or at ...
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2answers
75 views

A word for “being worked on”

Are there any adjectives meaning "being worked on" or "being in progress or development"? I need an intermediate step between "open" and "close" (talking about the process of fixing a software bug or ...
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1answer
81 views

How do you describe someone who is into incest?

pedophile - one who is into pre-pubescent children _____phile - one who is into incest? Is there a single word that fits into "He's a ______" to describe someone who is into incest? A hyphenated ...
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13answers
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An adjective or a single word that means something is “new” and “different” at the same time

When we say this approach is "New," new, here, doesn't necessarily imply that the approach is different from preceding approaches. When we say that it is "different," different, here, doesn't imply ...
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2answers
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Term for “brain-watering”

A mouth can water, but what does a brain do? I'm looking for a term that implies intellectual thirst, as when one has worked all day at a mindless task and only wants to read a novel, or essay, or ...
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2answers
81 views

Word for someone who isn't detail-oriented

I am pretty sure I have seen a word for someone who often misses small details, but it has slipped out of my mind. Any ideas?
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2answers
66 views

Is there an adjective describing the feeling of touching a cool, water-condensated surface?

I'm trying to describe the peculiar feeling when you touch a cool, water-condensated surface (like a soda can freshly out of the fridge, the indoor side of a window in winter, etc.). It's kind of an ...
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1answer
24 views

First strike vs. first-strike

I'm a bit confused about when to hyphenate in certain circumstances. Specifically, which of the following would I hyphenate? Launch a first strike Launch a second strike Damage first ...
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2answers
87 views

Adjective to describe “just because… doesn't necessarily mean…”

This is one of those phrases used very commonly (and apparently subject to lots of scrutiny on this website), but is difficult to define and also far too long to submit to a reverse dictionary. Let's ...
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Is there a word that means deliberately ignorant, choosing to ignore?

I know what this word really means but I cannot help to think that ignorant also means he ignores his surrounding or the consequences of his actions. "He was ignorant, unwilling to warn the police ...
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2answers
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Frequently Vs Frequent /Adverb form or Adjective form /

So normally adjectives like (frequent) modify a noun or a pronoun, whereas adverbs like (frequently) modify verbs or adjectives However, In this sentence both options seemd fine to me but i ...
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7answers
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Is there a word for the belief that everything is possible? [closed]

Either a word for belief itself or to describe a person who believes that any task is possible often in an irrational way.
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when “near” could be considered incorrect grammatically or semantically

Let's verify the word "nearby" is part of a constituent NP in the OP's #2 example: OP.2a. I live in a town nearby. <-- OP's #2 example it-clefts: OP.2b. It is [in a town nearby] that I live. ...
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3answers
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What's an adjective that describes Ophelia or someone who gives in to fate?

In the Shakespearean play, Hamlet, Ophelia is found drowned in a body of water. I believe she saw all of her opportunities in front of her but as the people around her (i.e. Polonius, Claudius, ...
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3answers
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I need an adjective to precede the word “method” [closed]

I am writing a scientific article and I need to give an adjective to a method that I am describing. The method introduces fuzzy logic, which could be the basis for the adjective.
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1answer
61 views

Ambiguous adjectives: fearful, suspicious, etc

Adjectives, for example... Suspicious, fearful, stressful, hopeful, etc... These adjectives describe that the addressee causes the certain quality or has himself the quality. "A fearful man" may ...
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2answers
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I found an unusual usage of adj, please tell me how it works [closed]

Following the terror attacks in London on July 7, 2005, the then Prime Minister Tony Blair insisted those responsible were motivated by an "evil ideology," ... From CNN. It uses those ...
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2answers
87 views

Why don't we say: “The shop is opened”? [duplicate]

Why do we write "The shop is open" and not "The shop is opened"? The passive voice is formed this way: verb + ed. On the other hand, we write "The shop is closed".
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1answer
75 views

Is there one word for a technique that improves your concentration?

This is the sentence: It [Tratak] has a cleansing effect on the eyes, is concentrating and energizing. I want to correct "concentrating" and replace it with one word which means "increasing ...
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“Focal” or “focussing” exercises, when training the eyes to focus better?

When doing certain eye exercises, such as looking at the thumb as you bring it to your nose and as you move it away from your nose, can you call them "Focal exercises","Focussing exercises" or both?
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The “noun as adjective” is singular. Always?

According to these rules for Noun as Adjective, the "noun as adjective" is singular. So we can write .NET Framework Class Library; here the word "Class" is a noun acting as an adjective and therefore ...
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6answers
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Something that is impossible but has happened [closed]

I would like to know if anyone knows the word for something that should be impossible but has happened. An example is the Big Bang Theory. It shouldn't have been possible but something happened for us ...
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1answer
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Offroad, off road, or off-road?

My instincts tell me that the following phrase should be "2014 and newer off-road equipment." When I Google it, I see all of the these: offroad, off road, and off-road. Is there a correct one? Or ...
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“Escaped” and “retired”

I want to check if what I know is correct or not. We can say "escaped prisoners". In this phrase, "escaped" works as a pre-modifier of "prisoner". But, we cannot use it as a post-modifier like "the ...
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4answers
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“dead brother's grandson” VS “passed-away brother's grandson”

One is dead brother's grandson (and) dead sister's grandson. The other is passed-away brother's grandson (and) passed-away sister's grandson. They come from part of a novel which I'm ...
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4answers
112 views

What can we call “ an employee who is under-productive but the quality of his work is enviable”

A pleasant expression for an employee who has remained under-productive despite several feedback. (QUANTITATIVELY WORST) There are workers who are unable to churn up BIG numbers but the ...
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Multiple and independent adjectives for a same kind of objects

What I am trying to describe has the following structure: A is P-like something. B is Q-like something. C is R-like something. An example I can think of is like this: A, B, and C are ...
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5answers
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What is the adjective meaning “great in area”?

We have length → long volume → voluminous But what is the corresponding adjective for "area"? I've found "areal", but it seems that this means "pertaining to an area", rather than "having area" ...
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2answers
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What is the meaning of “assisted interaction”?

Searching Google didn't help much and in the context below, it was related closely to "face-to-face interaction". Citizens may also simply prefer face-to-face or assisted interaction when applying ...
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2answers
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Is it correct to say “a new” or “the new”? [closed]

That's the whole question. Example: I'm creating a new version of the program Is there a set of rules one should follow? Thank you!
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2answers
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A word that would mean the following- “A desperate search for”

I have tried googling and stuff but couldn't find any satisfactory suggestion that would mean "A desperate search for"
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3answers
387 views

Word for a mind apt to seeing double entendres

The other day, I was hunting for a word to describe someone I know. The trait denoted by this word is the tendency to rapidly spot--as though unconsciously seeking out--double meanings, especially of ...
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1answer
43 views

Proper way to say “more and bigger”

I want to communicate (in written language) that "there are more pictures and bigger pictures if you click the link", without writing "pictures" twice and sounding silly. Is the construction "more ...
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1answer
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Is “America” an example of markedness?

There are North America, Central America, and South America. And, even within North America, there are the USA and Canada. Yet, in US English, if you mention "America" that means the USA. I am almost ...
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2answers
352 views

Correct or correctly: “I got them all correct / correctly”?

I just answered a battery of test questions, and posted the following comment: "I got them all correctly." Should I have said "I got them all correct."?
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5answers
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“Finnish Swedes” or “Swedish Finns”?

In Finland, there live 5.6 % Swedes (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/fi.html). They have lived there for many generations, being standard Finnish citizens, just ...
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4answers
900 views

What would you call that feeling of something crawling on the body

Morgellons is a controversial and poorly understood condition in which unusual thread-like fibers appear under the skin. The patient may feel like something is crawling, biting, or stinging ...