Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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What is the difference between “feudal” and “feudalistic”?

They are both adjectives related to feudalism. But what is the difference between the two in actual usage.
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5answers
2k views

Why “ruled supreme” instead of “ruled supremely”?

In this sentence: With George, his perfect manservant, and Miss Lemon, his perfect secretary, order and method ruled supreme in his life. Why is ruled followed by supreme instead of by ...
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1answer
35 views

“It's 20 meters thick” versus “It's a 20-meter-thick layer.”

I know that both of these expressions are correct, but I'd like to be able to explain exactly why the first one is correct. Of course compound adjectives are hyphenated (second expression), but in the ...
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20answers
3k views

A synonym for “soft” with a negative connotation

I'm looking for a synonym for soft, as in the opposite of coarse or crass. The context is a young French woman in Nazi Germany who asks a shopkeeper for something to catch a mouse in her house. The ...
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7answers
120 views

Describe someone who doesn't want anything better to happen to anyone else

I'm looking for a one (two might be ok) word description for a person who doesn't want anyone else to have a better life than himself. This is the type of person who will break your crayon on purpose ...
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5answers
86 views

Adjective meaning 'interesting, but not relevant'

I'm looking for a word to describe a podcast I was listening to. The podcast was interesting, but contents weren't relevant to my life or objectives, it was just an interesting story that you might ...
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3answers
301 views

Can adjectives be placed in front of verbs, e.g. “The duck was busy diving for food”?

The duck was busy diving for food. The duck was busily diving for food. Are both sentences grammatically correct? If the first one is correct, does it mean that adjectives can be placed ...
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1answer
36 views

Adjective after Verb in “He looks tired” [on hold]

How do we call the verb "looks"? Is it stative verb? How do we call the adjective "tired"? Any linguistic term to call it? Is it attributive adjective?
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2answers
45 views

Fissile equivalent for fusion

If an isotope(such as uranium 235) can support fission, one might say it is fissile. What would you call a material like deuterium can support fusion, what would you call it?
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0answers
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pattern to predict -ent vs -ant? [duplicate]

Is there any pattern to predict whether to use -ant or -ent, in words such as those below? abundant / attendant / arrogant VS abhorrent / absorbent / dependent I find -ent seems to be more common... ...
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0answers
55 views

Is there a word for someone who is intellectually mediocre? [duplicate]

I am looking for the noun for a person who is intellectually mediocre. Words like fool, moron, dunce, loser, idiot, etc. are all too negative. They describe a person who is intellectually worse than ...
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0answers
31 views

Adjective or adverb? [closed]

Which is correct? I want her to grow up confident. I want her to grow up confidently.
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1answer
65 views

What category of adjectives is this? i.e. adjectives entirely unlike their nouns

Consider the noun "Jupiter", either the Roman god or the giant gaseous planet in our Solar System. The adjective is "jovian", entirely unrelated. Is this a distinct class of adjectives? I suspect ...
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1answer
35 views

What is the difference between “acquisitional”, “acquisitive”, and “acquisitory”?

I am actually a native speaker, but this one threw me. "Acquisitory" seems to be associated with avarice/greed, possibly specifically for material goods. "Acquisitive" also seems to be related to ...
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6answers
78 views

Word for “the capacity of habituating to new environment”

I am in search of a word that has the meaning of 'capacity of a person to habituate to a new environment'. I can use adaptability. Like he is more adaptable than others. But 'adaptable' may not ...
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1answer
55 views

Use of the adjective “ape” to describe similar objects

I recently got a mail from a customer saying that something went wrong on his "ape computer". As a non-native english speaker, I know that the verb "to ape" exists with the meaning of "to mimic". I ...
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3answers
56 views

Can/Should an adjective and an attributive noun be used to modify the same noun?

I am writing a scientific thesis and wondering about the heading of one of the major parts. The part gives detailed information on experiments (experimental details) that were performed and ...
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3answers
90 views

An adjective to indicate that there is too much text on a slide

Your slide is too adj What's an adjective to indicate that there are too many words on a slide?
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1answer
83 views

Is there an adjective to call someone who gets bullied?

I need an adjective to call someone who gets bullied. An adjective for a victim.
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2answers
82 views

Unaffected vs Uneffected

I have always struggled with this. Consider the following statement: Format string before insert into database else return unaffected string Would I use unaffected or uneffected in this ...
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2answers
63 views

Repetition of indefinite article with several adjectives

Sindbad was a rich and a famous sailor. Sindbad was a rich and famous sailor. Which of these are correct? What is the general rule for using articles before a noun with two adjectives?
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3answers
71 views

What is a word for someone who enjoys discussions? [closed]

Someone who enjoys discussions could be described as?
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1answer
36 views

what is the personality trait for someone that can't think fast, slow learner etc

what is the personality trait for someone that can't think fast, slow learner. Writing down a character is slow sounds ok but is there any other way i could describe my story character
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1answer
45 views

Word for a gift you get by virtue of your job

I am certain I once read a definition of a word that describes the gift you get only by virtue of your job and not really given to you personally. Like, when the US President gets a rug from the ...
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16answers
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What is a word for a person who uses resources to the maximum?

Is there a word (or words) for a person who uses all resources to the maximum; for example, a person who keeps on using pencils even if they are very small?
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2answers
242 views

Can we use “elder to” as a comparative adjective?

As I understand, in comparative form of Adjectives, elder is used of persons, and older is used of both persons or things. One other feature of elder is that it is not used with than. However, it is ...
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1answer
35 views

Verb and adjective usage

Since adjectives are used to describe nouns, can verbs be used to describe nouns as well? For example: Two men standing with clenched fists are US athletes. Here fist is a noun and to describe ...
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3answers
51 views

when to use younger than and younger to?

Which one is correct? She is younger than me. Or She is younger to me. My teacher said, some adjectives like ' senior, junior, superior, inferior, major, minor, interior, posterior, younger, elder, ...
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1answer
42 views

Could you tell me whether it is adjective or verb at a sentence, “The mall is located…”

I am reading a vocab book to learn English. There is a example sentence. That is, "The mall is located his client's long-lost cousin in Mexico." At the sentence, the 'located', I was sure it was ...
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1answer
32 views

Client compliance, client's compliance or a client's compliance?

I'm working on a job application covering note and I'm really struggling with one particular phrase. Here's the full sentence: "I possess strong analytical and investigative skills as demonstrated by ...
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1answer
45 views

Why in some sentences noun comes before adjective? [closed]

Why in some sentences noun comes before adjective ? For example robot soccer instead of soccer robot.
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1answer
40 views

Is the “your” the appropriate “your”?

But then, I think, who could possibly come close to matching the dedication and personal commitment that you have brought to this school, your Alma Mater. You will probably be the last member of the ...
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2answers
68 views

What is a man that speaks without saying a word called? [closed]

What is a man that speaks without saying a word called? I have searched for words that describe it but couldn't get a word that simply covers it.
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1answer
57 views

English versus french grammar

Recently, on the internet, I have heard people say that one should conjugate cartain adjectives that are closely related to french. For example, blond for males and blonde for females in the singular ...
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13answers
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An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?

What would be a suitable term for someone who has a lot of gall or has the gall to? Specifically someone who has wronged you or yours, or taken something from you, and should be repentant (and ...
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3answers
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What's an adjective to describe something “Of or relating to a row”?

Columnal: "Columnar" Columnar: "of, relating to, resembling, or characterized by columns" Tabular: "of, relating to, or arranged in a table"
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What is an “American style shopping mall”?

Consider the phrase: "American style shopping mall?" Implicit here is a large multi-story enclosed gallery with lots of shops on a passageway that connects the "Generators" (large department stores ...
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0answers
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Should I say “increased” is an adjective in the following sentence?

Is "increased" an adjective in the context which has come after the verb "get". Senselessness of leaders is getting increased. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you in advanced.
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3answers
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Is there a single word (or expression) used to describe a person who only does their job when the boss/manager is watching?

"Quick the boss is coming, we need to look busy" Is there a single word (or expression) to describe a person who only does their job while someone (the boss/manager) is watching, but who does ...
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1answer
60 views

Adjective for “wide” space?

I'm trying to translate something from Japanese. The original is talking about a store that is very "wide", i.e., its sideways dimensions are disproportionately long. You could think of it as a place ...
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4answers
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How do I determine which adjective to use here?

It was a treat to see your group perform its music at the community event. Could you do the same for us at a private gathering next month? My company will be hosting a welcoming celebration for ...
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2answers
85 views

In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?

If you have a place name such as “The Sierra Nevada Mountains”, does Sierra Nevada act as an adjective? My guess is yes, since they qualify the noun mountains, e.g.: “Which mountains? The Sierra ...
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British and Canadian but not Coloradan?

In the May 11 issue of this year's New Yorker, the ever-excellent Atul Gawande wrote (emphasis mine): Among those which caught my eye: a British case report on the first 3-D-printed hip implanted ...
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5answers
115 views

An adjective that would subtly imply that the criticism is not a personal grudge

I have expressed disapproval of sb/sth and my professor has escalated the issue to the management stating behavioral issues. I am writing a letter explaining what went wrong. I want to state that ...
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2answers
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Redundancy in “becoming increasingly”

Isn't it redundant to say "becoming increasingly (adjective)"? I know this is a common construction, but it seems to me that increasingly already includes the idea that it is already (adjective) but ...
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2answers
48 views

Should I place a comma or “and” between the adjectives “frequent” & “new”?

I have a phrase "Frequent Automatic Renewals". Must there be a comma, or should I separate them with an "and"?
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2answers
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Joyful vs Joyous

Is there any difference between the usages of the words joyful and joyous? E.g. Could you say both "He was uncontrollably joyful." and "He was uncontrollably joyous."?
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2answers
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What is the meaning of “phantastic” and what does a dated form of a word mean?

I recently saw this word used in a Android SE post and at first I thought the user misspelt the word but actually I found that a word "phantastic" exists. The phantastic meaning of yourdictionary ...
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4answers
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Correct order of adjectives in “A new comfortable bed” [closed]

"A new comfortable bed"" or "A comfortable new bed" Which one is correct?
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55 views

“Complicated” or “complicating”

Can anyone tell me why sentence (A) is wrong, and (B) is correct? (A) "The topic of landmines is very heavy and complicating." (B) "The topic of landmines is very heavy and complicated." To me, ...