Adjectives are words, or phrases naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

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Is there a word for the opposing ends of a tangible scale, as there are “obverse” and “reverse” to describe the physical sides of a coin-like object [on hold]

I feel that obverse and reverse are too "Geometric" to properly describe more complex ideas in society where something is not in reality in a completely opposite position in relation to another. For ...
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0answers
34 views

Words describing extent/ degree of 'jeopardy?' [on hold]

I am writing a letter to describe the future of a country is in serious jeopardy, in the sense that all cultures, economies, rules of games and so on will be lost in a second. Which adjectives I can ...
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2answers
57 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective?

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
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1answer
42 views

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be ...
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3answers
54 views

“Evocative” vs. “provocative” [on hold]

I am starting to use evocative and provocative interchangeably. I would like to understand the difference between these words and when one should be used instead of the other. I would also ...
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4answers
517 views

Rule for when to use “thin” versus “narrow”

My 5-year-old asked this morning if you would say a road was "thin" or "narrow". We had no difficulty telling her she should use "narrow" in that case, but couldn't explain why. We found it ...
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3answers
67 views

What is an adjective to describe something that caused a problem?

I have an error message that describes the cause for a problem/crash in my application. What is an adjective I can use to refer to that error message? I would like to say something like this: ...
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0answers
42 views

Difference between 'editor concerned' & 'concerned editor'? [closed]

I raised a query about an article in the forums. I got a mail from the moderator telling me to send the query to the concerned editor by a PM instead of raising it in the forums. I think the ...
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1answer
37 views

untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
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1answer
29 views

Alternative to “wide-ranging” adjective for “audience” [closed]

What is a good adjective that describes an audience as coming from a wide spectrum of different backgrounds?
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6answers
85 views

Better than expected as an adjective?

Is there an adjective that can sum up "better than expected"? For example: "Progress was better than expected." Is there a single word I can use to describe what the progress was like? I'm looking ...
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5answers
82 views

What is a noun or adjective to describe somebody who juggles work, study, hobbies, family and more?

I'm trying to describe someone who burns the candle at both ends. They work full-time, they study full-time, they have creative projects on the go, they raise their family and manage their property - ...
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2answers
81 views

Word to Warn of Danger of Usage

I need a term or word to refer to something which is very powerful but if used naïvely will cause great harm. I could say: "This is a [noun], use with care." or: "Use this with care it is ...
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1answer
28 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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1answer
42 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
2
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1answer
89 views

“Not only one of the most talented actors of our age but kind.” — what does 'kind' mean here?

I was searching for information about the original novel "House of Cards" and from following site, in the middile of the page, there's sentence which compliment Kevin Spicey as shown ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Can “nice” when used about people mean “beautiful”? Can a nice woman be ugly?

Can nice used with a person be about his/her look? Can I use a nice woman and mean (sexually) attractive, like in a beautiful woman? Or is it always only about their behaviour and kindness, when used ...
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0answers
32 views

Should this sentence use “is ambitious” or “is ambition”? [migrated]

Which of these two is better, and why: the first one with the adjective or the second one with the noun? I think the characteristic that best describes me is ambitious. I think the characteristic ...
2
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1answer
68 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
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5answers
135 views

How do you describe something that has “just enough” details?

I want to describe something that is neither too broad and general, nor too detailed. It may be fit to just describe it as "a detailed analysis of so-and-so..", but I want to emphasize the fact that ...
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2answers
40 views

Do we need hyphen in this: graded-reading books?

Is it necessary to have a hyphen in the following phrase? graded-reading books Please my friends you are only hope for me at a last chance salon because my teacher he is not knowing answer.
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1answer
59 views

The difference between medium and intermediate

I wish to know the difference between medium and intermediate. There is an academic use for me trying to describe a physical parameter (a coupling constant of interactions) which is not too strong, ...
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1answer
44 views

'susceptible of' vs 'susceptible to"

What are their similarities and differences? The definitions on http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/susceptible look similar: for example, A is 'influenced or affected' by B, ...
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9answers
1k views

Single-word adjective for “which should be repaired”

I'm looking for a term to characterise things which should be repaired. I am also looking for an antonym to go with it. Imagine I have two boxes, one with phones which should be repaired and the ...
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1answer
29 views

Can you place “so” after an adjective for emphasis?

Normally you write, for example, Life is so fleeting. She's so beautiful. "so" is used for emphasis. Can you invert it with an adjective to have more emphasis? Life is fleeting so. She's ...
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12answers
1k views

Adjective to describe someone who is knowledgeable, resolute, and calm

I have a situation/feeling that occurs to me frequently and I'm not sure what the adjective is to describe it (or if there even is one). I'd love to hear your ideas on the matter. The situation is ...
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1answer
60 views

Can we use the word “initiative” as an adjective?

I'd like to ask if we can use the word initiative as an adjective. I have found it used that way, but there is no entry for initiative as an adjective in the Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary.
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1answer
62 views

In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
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2answers
49 views

“A 1000-sqft room” vs. “a 1000 sq. ft. room”

Which of the following is correct? This is a 1000-sqft room This is a 1000 sq. ft. room Or perhaps neither is right and there's a better alternative?
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3answers
111 views

Adjective for the adverb “soon”

I am looking for an adjective that corresponds to the adverb soon, to fit a sentence such as: That feature will be added in an [adjective] update. Is there an adjective with the same meaning as ...
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0answers
36 views

How to determine the correct meaning for 'discursive'? [closed]

Would someone please explain how to ascertain the correct meaning of discursive, or how to resolve the opposition in these two meanings? Digressing from subject to subject 1.1. (Of a ...
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3answers
60 views

a word for an unfamiliar situation

Is there a single word for an unfamiliar situation or a better way of wording this? If a situation is unfamiliar to you.
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5answers
80 views

How to describe the smell of a stagnant pond in hot climate?

When you have a stagnant pool of water (like a pond) in a hot climate, the water smells a bit. Stale perhaps, but not quite reeks or stinks or foul. How do you best describe this smell?
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2answers
74 views

Can “here” be an adjective? [duplicate]

This book here is the one I was talking about. My brother here just bought a new car. The two examples above have here following a noun. Most dictionaries say "here" is an adverb. I am ...
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20answers
5k views

What is a word for annoying behavior which decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?

I'm looking for a word which describes an annoying behavior that decreases the overall quality of a game or match, specifically in online gaming (Halo, Call of Duty, etc.) The behavior, while not ...
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2answers
50 views

Two contrasting definitions of “fiat”

Would someone please explain and elucidate these two meanings? Why do they diverge and mismatch? A decree sounds much more prescriptive and resolute than an arbitrary order. A formal ...
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2answers
63 views

When is comparative degree adjectives with no “than” preferable?

Are there any rules / recommendation to using comparative "larger" instead of positive "large" when there is no comparison? What are they (recommendation of course)? Examples: "I, __, take you, __, ...
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0answers
25 views

Adjective form of “integrity” [duplicate]

I have become a more honest person. Is there a way in which I can replace the word honest in the above sentence with an adjective with the same root as integrity?
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2answers
51 views

Adjective NOUN1 AND NOUN2

If someone says "Today I bought trendy shirts and shoes.", does he imply that even the shoes are trendy? In general, if you have sentences of the form ADJECTIVE NOUN1 and NOUN2, does the adjective ...
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2answers
49 views

Less-experienced vs less experienced employee

As an Android developer with 3 years of experience, I also help less experienced team members. Do I need to put a hyphen between "less" and "experienced"?
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2answers
54 views

Single word for person entitled to receive a sales commission

I need a fairly specific single word for a person who is entitled to receive a sales commission. "Agent" for example isn't specific enough. A short phrase is also usable. Adjectives ditto. The ...
3
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10answers
722 views

Is there an adjective for someone who can withstand ridicule?

I've been searching both my mind and several thesauruses attempting to find the adjective that best describes this type of person. The term "thick-skinned" is the closest to what I am trying to ...
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2answers
44 views

Enlightenment, enlightened, Illuminism, illuminist

The Enlightenment was a cultural movement of intellectuals (Europe, XVIII century). It is associated with the Scientific Revolution, the Atlantic Revolutions (American Revolution, French Revolution, ...
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2answers
50 views

Words with Unexpected Meanings (like “restive”)

I'd like to rationalise its startling "opposite" definition which acknowledges that "The original sense, 'inclined to remain still', has undergone a reversal." What induced this change? Moreover, is ...
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3answers
110 views

Is there a word for someone born in the UK?

While watching the World Cup game a few minutes ago, I was wondering what if the United Kingdom - and not England - had a National Team, with English, Scottish, Welsh, and Northern Ireland players ...
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3answers
95 views

Recognizing right relative pronouns for clauses

I have read some grammar points about adjective clauses, but I still have problems recognizing the right choice in questions requiring them. A Jekyll and Hyde is a person who has two ...
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9answers
995 views

Is there a word for people who always act too friendly in order to curry favor with their acquaintances?

Is there a single noun or adjective for a person who is always flattering friends and acquaintances, not only to be liked and accepted but, at other times, to curry favor with them as well ? I'm not ...
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3answers
84 views

Problem in adjective clauses’ grammar

I have read some grammar points about adjective clauses, but I still have problems recognizing the right choice in questions requiring them. For example: All the students ____ do well in writing. ...
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2answers
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Conjugations of Ancillary

Ancillary is already something of an uncommon word in conversation, but it came up recently in a StackOverflow chat room in the following example: Person 1: "Are you talking about me?" Person 2: ...
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1answer
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As a noun, “abandon” is almost always preceded by the word “reckless”. [duplicate]

Feel free to correct me if you don't share the same experience, but in my own experience, usage of the word "abandon" as a noun without being apart of the phrase "reckless abandon" is extremely rare. ...