Linked Questions

4
votes
3answers
332 views

'To swiftly go' or 'to go swiftly'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? One of my friends once told me 'to go' is considered a whole word and no word should be put ...
4
votes
1answer
461 views

Is using split infinitive allowed in formal English? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? Is it allowed to use split infinitives in formal English? I look into Wikipedia but it is ...
0
votes
1answer
706 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
1
vote
1answer
689 views

Grammaticality of Star Trek's slogan [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? Star Trek's slogan: To boldly go where no man has gone before. "To boldy go" sounds ...
-1
votes
2answers
268 views

“how to not give up” or “how not to give up” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? Order of “not” with infinitive Suppose I want to tell someone that I want to ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

'decide not to' or 'decide to not' ? [duplicate]

I came up with this question when I received an email from a committee with a sentence 'We have decided not to publish it', which seems really strange to me because the grammar I learned in English ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

“to successfully complete” or “to complete successfully”? [duplicate]

A Google search yields 41,200,000 results for the former but only 3,150,000 for the latter. Are split infinitives really to boldly be avoided in English grammar, or are millions of people just ...
20
votes
8answers
3k views

Is there a rule about double negations that aren't meant as double negations (e.g. “We don't need no education”)?

How can you explain that this double negation is not a double negation? Is there a rule in English about this kind of sentence? PS / Do I have to mention Pink Floyd Copyright ? :-) Edit : Since ...
22
votes
7answers
15k views

Order of “not” with infinitive

This is one thing that keeps bugging me, and maybe there's a direct answer. Grammatically, which one is more correct of these two? Does it make a difference? I tried not to do that. I tried ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
4
votes
6answers
7k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Auxiliary verb and adverb ordering

(I'm not really sure if the title is a correct definition of my problem at all) I'm not a native English speaker, and I'm used to say: Spaghetti suddenly can talk But I've seen a phrase from a ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“to further assist [you]” — Split infinitive or fixed VP?

From a descriptive standpoint (and the problem that English has at least two words in an infinitive), I understand why the split infinitive is becoming more acceptable, but is there any other excuse ...

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