Linked Questions

4
votes
2answers
1k views

When a foreign word or phrase becomes English [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? There are many words or phrases in English that are clearly of foreign origin yet become so commonplace they are ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

What makes an English word, an English word? [duplicate]

There are many new words being added to the dictionary at all times. These include "twerking" or "Google" but who decides if it should be in the dictionary and be an English word? Here is my theory. ...
-3
votes
0answers
27 views

Why do people say that “sensical” is not a word? [duplicate]

Nonsensical is obviously a word, and it's a negative connotation. Why can't something be sensical if it can be nonsensical? There's uninviting, but inviting is correct, isn't it? I see many books on ...
4
votes
6answers
834 views

In which countries is that “long time no see” greeting common?

I used to hear this greeting several times a day when in Singapore. In other English-speaking countries, is this idiomatic expression known, do people consider it funny, or just a terrible ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

Is funner a word? [duplicate]

I am constantly told "funner" is not a word. Even Google auto corrects. Yet "funner" is used very often in spoken English with people I meet. Is funner a word? If not why? What causes it to not be ...
9
votes
3answers
702 views

When does a neologism cease to be a neologism?

What benchmarks or useful signs can be found to declassify neologisms? Obviously, inclusion in a dictionary is as likely as anything to declare a neologism a word but what happens just before that ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
3
votes
3answers
580 views

Is there an 'official' way to suggest a new word become part of the English language? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Regulatory bodies and authoritative dictionaries for English Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? I've always been told, at ...
0
votes
2answers
745 views

Irregular verbs in English

The English language has a huge number of irregular verbs(~470). This is significantly more than other languages e.g. French (~130), German (~200) Irregular verbs make the English language ...
1
vote
3answers
695 views

Creating a new word

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“10 Commonly Misunderstood Words In English”

We have all probably misunderstood words and then used them in the wrong context from time to time, so a little update might come in handy. This infographic from Grammar called 10 Commonly ...
-2
votes
1answer
879 views

How is a word coined? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? What if I want to use the term supertibi somewhere accompanying superego? We have superego ...
-2
votes
2answers
453 views

Is “unmissable” a valid word?

I noticed an advert on TV advertising "unmissable" shows coming up. MS Word marks it as a spelling mistake, but the Mac OS is OK with it. I don't particularly like it.
0
votes
1answer
334 views

If enough people start using a word contextually wrong when does the word's meaning change? [closed]

Example Say some percent of the English speaking population started using the word "sky" to replace the meaning of "cloud", at what percent would you be wrong in using the word "sky" to refer to the ...

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