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Please evaluate this sentence for its correctness. I'm concerned about the use of of in front of falling.

However, you're utterly off in your assessment about failing in love for someone else. I haven't found anyone worthy of falling for, and I will not compromise my feelings to just try.

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typo, I believe you meant "falling in love" not "failing in love." Also assessment of sounds better than assessment about to my native english speaking ear. –  ghoppe Jan 24 '11 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can "fall for someone", but the parallel phrase is not "fall in love for someone", it is "fall in love with someone". The text "haven't found anyone worthy of falling for" is awkward, but acceptable English. The text "you're utterly off in your assessment about falling in love for someone else" is incorrect in context since you fall in love "with" someone else.

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Other than the couple quibbles I had with the preamble, noted in my comment, I believe the phrase found anyone worthy of falling for sounds fine in the context presented.

You wrote about falling in love in your first sentence, so the phrase seems unambiguous and understandable to me.

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How about

I haven't found anyone worth falling for, and I will not compromise my feelings to just try.

or

I haven't found anyone worthy of my affection, and I will not compromise my feelings to just try.

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