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A picture of the king.

A picture of the king's.

What exactly is the difference between the two?

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closed as general reference by Matt E. Эллен, Roaring Fish, Hellion, MετάEd, J.R. Jan 10 '13 at 13:59

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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You might be interested in our proposed sister site specifically for English language learners. You can support it by committing. Thank you. – RegDwigнt Jan 10 '13 at 11:36
    
I do not believe this question is appropriate for EL&U as it is very basic. – Matt E. Эллен Jan 10 '13 at 11:36
    
I think you will find your answer in these questions. – tchrist Jan 10 '13 at 11:55
    
Please see the double-genitive tag wiki for details. – tchrist Jan 10 '13 at 15:19

The first one is a depiction of the king. The second one is a picture owned by the king that could be of anything.

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I understand. Thank you for helping me. – Yujin Jan 10 '13 at 11:39
    
You're welcome. – tylerharms Jan 10 '13 at 11:55

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