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How do you define hit here in this comment, does it mean attack? This comment was made by a poster in response to a discussion on car wheel thefts.

New model Chevy rims are hot as f-k, every Mexican wants them for his truck he bought as a base model. Around Houston they hit entire dealerships for the rims.

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It's more likely to be "covert" attacks. They rob the dealerships - but probably stealthily, under cover of darkness. I doubt it means they storm in with guns blazing (which might be okay for robbing banks, but I doubt these new Chevy rims are quite that valuable! :) –  FumbleFingers Jan 9 '13 at 2:33
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Or maybe they just walk in with bags of money, and make the dealer an "offer he can't refuse" for his entire stock as soon as it's delivered. –  FumbleFingers Jan 9 '13 at 2:34
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What's an "entire dealership"? Does this mean that every Houston Chevy dealer has two or more separate locations? Or just that at every Chevy dealership these Mexicans steal or buy all the "new model Chevy rims" instead of the actual four they need per truck? Whoever wrote the comment needs a couple of writing lessons. –  user21497 Jan 9 '13 at 2:57
    
Yes, if they "hit an entire dealership", they take the rims off of every car on the lot; they don't restrict their theft to just one set of four to put on their own car. –  Hellion Jan 9 '13 at 4:26
    
However out of context it does not necessarily mean they rob the store in my opinion. The Mexican bought his truck and is now desperately visiting all dealerships to get the new rims. Let's hit the stores this afternoon before the crowd gets there –  mplungjan Jan 9 '13 at 6:50

3 Answers 3

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It means stealing the rims from all the cars in a Chevy dealer's lot. "They" means unknown criminals, not necessarily Mexican, who are stealing the rims because of the demand from the Mexicans.

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Out of context it does not necessarily mean they rob the store in my opinion.

The Mexicans in question bought their trucks and may now desperately be visiting all dealerships to get the new rims since they are quickly sold out, so other people cannot get new rims.

Shoppers hit the store for the Target-Nieman Marcus holiday

and

My 2013 M5 has hit the dealership in NJ! - Just got the call from my dealer, the truck from the port arrived directly to the dealer and therefore.... the beast is officially at my dealer!

However

Cropper said when the group hit a dealership in Stonewall, they stole the tires and wheels off more than 70 new Ford pick-up trucks.

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It doesn't mean attack, though that may be its origin. Hit to mean arrive at is more commonly used in the context of e.g. a military attack. From that it became a slangy expression (one might hit a hip joint, once upon a time, but now that sounds like an injury common in the elderly, which I suppose is appropriate). From that it just meant arriving at some place. There is still a connotation of an attack implying not necessarily malice or theft (though that is also a valid and current meaning) but that there are tremendous numbers of such customers.

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