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Possible Duplicate:
What is the proper way to write the plural of a single letter? (another apostrophe question)
Plurals of acronyms, letters, numbers — use an apostrophe or not?

Take for example, you ask somebody is there's two of one letter in somebody's name.

I normally write:

Two n's in Hannah?

Because this looks weird:

Two ns in Hannah?

Is there an English rule that approves of this apostrophe usage? Do you do it? Am I wrong for thinking ns looks wierd?

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marked as duplicate by Carlo_R., MετάEd, Cerberus, RegDwigнt Dec 30 '12 at 21:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

The British linguist David Crystal has written that the apostrophe ‘avoids an awkward juxtaposition of symbols, especially with plurals’. ns is one such case. Write it as n’s.

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