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Palms rise to the universe
As we moonshine and molly
Feel the warmth, we’ll never die
We’re like diamonds in the sky

In the above part of Rihanna's Diamonds song, what does she mean by "as we moonshine and molly"?

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closed as off topic by Bill Franke, tchrist, Kris, MετάEd, FumbleFingers Dec 29 '12 at 17:38

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Interpreting song lyrics isn't part of the job description here, especially for contemporary stuff that seems prima facie incomprehensible. Maybe a beautiful woman with a good voice can get away with singing this kind of stuff for money, but I wouldn't pay to listen to it. "Feel the warmth"? Rod McKuen. "We'll never die"? Schizophrenia. "Moonshine and molly"? Does anybody really care? –  user21497 Dec 29 '12 at 9:36
    
Nice song; sadly, off-topic on ELU. –  Kris Dec 29 '12 at 14:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The OED gives two definitions for the verb moonshine. The first is ‘To cheat or deceive (a person) with appealing and persuasive but empty talk.’ The second is ‘To distil liquor, especially whisky, illicitly.’ Molly (same source) can mean ‘To engage in homosexual anal intercourse with’ or it can mean the same as mollycoddle, that is, ‘To coddle, pamper; to treat in an over-indulgent or excessively protective way.’

You can take your pick from the meanings given, depending on how you want to interpret the song, or there may be other meanings of which the OED is innocent. Song lyrics are open to all sorts of interpretations, which is why they are generally regarded as off-topic here, so don’t be surprised if the question is closed.

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