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I'm looking for a single noun to indicate a document (or web page) that contains a person's contact information (phone, email, etc.).

The context is a navigation element on a personal website, for example:

Home | Bio | Contact Page

I want to substitute the text "Contact Page" with the word I'm seeking.

Archaic, formal or loaned words are perfectly acceptable, even desired. The tone of the website is humorous.

A word that has a metaphorically connected meaning (similar to the way "Home" is understood to mean "The Home Page"), though less desirable, is still acceptable.

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What's wrong with "Contact"? That's what seems to be used on many (maybe even most) sites. –  Andrew Leach Dec 26 '12 at 21:26
    
Nothing at all's wrong with it! I use "Contact" regularly, and may use it as a fallback if I can't think of something here. For aesthetic reasons, for this site, I wanted to do something that was a little bit off-the-beaten-path. –  GladstoneKeep Dec 26 '12 at 21:28
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Contact is the conventional term for the purpose, and that's how it is currently understood by everyone, in the context. For more, try ux.SE –  Kris Dec 27 '12 at 6:49
    
If you don't mind a bit older word that means one place where you store all of your contact information, "Rolodex" might work. (Note that it is a trademarked name.) –  JLG Dec 27 '12 at 16:25
    
I appreciate the nudges toward a mass market-friendly term for the link text. I agree that "Contact" would be correct in 99.999% of all cases. However, this website employs an unconventional narrative voice, so an unconventional word is more befitting -- and fun. –  GladstoneKeep Jan 1 '13 at 16:37
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6 Answers

You could use "my card", making a joking metaphor of a card containing contact details (these days normally a "business card", but gentlemen had cards in the days when gentlemen would not be so crass as to discuss business).

Most often used is either "Contact" or "Contact Us"/"Contact Me"/"Contact [Your Name]".

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I do like the ring of "my card" or even "calling card" ... –  GladstoneKeep Dec 26 '12 at 21:34
    
You could have fun with it. I'd avoid "card" on its own as a bit oblique, though if it was vCard or RDF/XML vCard format, then I'd be tempted. –  Jon Hanna Dec 26 '12 at 21:41
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One idea just came to mind: dossier.

Not quite right, but may spur a better idea!

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Maybe it's just me, but dossier sounds like something MI6 has about you, rather than something you put up about yourself. –  Rahul Narain Dec 27 '12 at 5:47
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If you're going down the straight and conventional? I'd suggest the slightly odd sounding, but highly standardized term about.

Head to any major page and if I can't find a straight up contact us link, then this is where I'll go to next for that kind of detail.

If you're going for something a bit left-field, how about particulars?

I'd associate it more with personal info (height/weight/etc) - here's an example of a personal particulars card from the National Archives of Australia - but I wouldn't be too surprised to have contact details stashed in it.

You'd generally need to state what kind of particulars but depending on audience, they might get the idea that that page is full of 'detail-like information' which could be enough if the other links are clearly for other things.

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I particularly like particulars. –  KitFox Dec 27 '12 at 15:01
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You could go with Dope or Lowdown to mean information, depending on the tone of your site.

You might also consider Interface.

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How about linkage, passage, access, doorway, details, curriculum.

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It's a little bland, but "Profile" seems to me fairly standard practice.

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