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Let's say we have a guy who is stupid and weak and everybody picks on him and mocks him all the time. What would we call this guy?

I found timid in the dictionary but I am looking for a colloquial word.

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For shame! A guy who is “stupid and weak” deserves your pity, your help, and your compassion, not your derision and abuse — even if it is just verbal abuse, which all of the supplied solutions save mine definitely count as. –  tchrist Dec 25 '12 at 18:54
    
'timid' is fearful. Though that may go along with our description it is not the defining feature of what you are asking for. –  Mitch Dec 25 '12 at 19:06
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Fall guy = easy victim : boob, can-carrier, chopping block, chump, dupe, easy mark, easy touch, fool, goat, lamb to the slaughter, mark, patsy, pigeon, prize sap, sacrifice, sap, scapegoat, schlemiel, schmuck, sitting duck, soft touch, stooge, sucker, trusting soul, victim, whipping boy. –  user21497 Dec 25 '12 at 23:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I found all of these in a thesaurus, under the entry for weakling:

pushover, namby-pamby, coward, milksop; informal wimp, weed, sissy, twinkie, drip, softie, doormat, chicken, yellow-belly, scaredy-cat, wuss

Based on your question, I'd recommend pushover or doormat from that list. Others might work better if you want to emphasize the person's weakness, as opposed to their status as a perpetual victim.

Wuss might work well, too; NOAD defines it as a weak or ineffectual person (often used as a general term of abuse).

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Pushover is the way to go, yeah. –  juanzack Dec 3 '13 at 11:47
    
The long list only goes to prove that not everyone looks at the problem the same way. There are many more alternatives in fact, depending upon how the situation is perceived. –  Kris Jan 10 at 5:37
    
@Kris - That happens a lot when a request for a word is only two or three sentences long, with scant details. –  J.R. Jan 10 at 11:00
    
The Q at hand having (3) sentences and less than scant details tells me. :) –  Kris Jan 11 at 5:28
    
I don't understand what you're getting at. The more well-defined a question is, the easier it is to figure out what kind of word an O.P. is after. When fewer details are provided, it's easier to perceive the situation from different angles, and come up with a whole list of candidates that could fit the bill. –  J.R. Jan 11 at 9:59

How about schlemiel, a Yiddish loan word meaning an inept, clumsy, stupid person whom everyone picks on? It's only commonly used in the USA, however, in places with a strong Jewish influence.

"A person so inept even inanimate objects pick on them." (UD)

Indeed, his name derives from the Yiddish expression for "little man," and through much of the film Kleinman acts like the helpless schlemiel of Jewish humor, who is impotent before the overwhelming forces that assail him. (Self-knowledge and personal growth in Woody Allen's films …

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Pee-on (slang): A person who is of such low status in society that it is socially acceptable for another person of higher status to pee on them.

Courtesy of Urban Dictionary.

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Oh, come on! I hear this word all the time! You don't have to like it, but why would you vote me negative?? –  stewSquared Jan 10 at 18:31

In the spirit of Christmas, I believe the right answer here is victim.

Other possibilities, arranged from short to long, include prey, mark, butt, gull, wretch, target, quarry, martyr, underdog, sufferer, innocent, scapegoat, sacrifice, and unfortunate.

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I agree with your sentiments (and even used the word victim in my answer), but I think there are contexts where one might search for such a word without an intent to use it negatively. One example is when encouraging a victim of bullying to stand up for themselves, i.e.: "Don't be an [X]; stand up for yourself!" Another example might be exhorting someone to be brave or strong in a time of hardship, like a lineman during a football game, and you're not really calling someone's strength into quesiton. I had such contexts in mind when I recommended doormat or pushover. –  J.R. Dec 25 '12 at 22:17

Runt seems a potential choice.

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Why do you think it could be a 'potential choice'? You don't seem to like poor piglets? :) –  Kris Jan 10 at 5:33

Another more colloquial option would be to refer to him as your punching bag (something/someone that just stands there and takes your abuse anytime you care to dish it out).

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Perhaps fall guy, one who, in the OED’s definition, ‘is easily tricked, an easy victim; one who "takes the rap" for others, a scapegoat.’

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protected by MrHen Jan 10 at 4:18

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