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What is a right word to describe Content/Performance? It is about best and effective content that form a complete artefact.

The example text as below:

5.4.1 Content/Performance This is about a better user experience, the effectiveness of the artefact and the context of the contents. It is part of the critical component for target users to experience, and the aesthetic is explained in the post-question survey.

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I'm sorry to say that I think you need more help than just a word for content/performance. Even given your explanation it is not at all clear what you are trying to say. –  Jim Dec 24 '12 at 22:26
    
I imagine this is in a limited field where words have a specialist meaning, since an artefact does not usually have any content, and its performance is not usually subjectively assessed. More context might help, but you may have to consult a lexicon for your particular field. –  TimLymington Dec 24 '12 at 22:41
    
@TimLymington- in the the software industry an artifact is anything produced in the software development lifecycle, so a user's manual, architecture spec, requirements spec, detailed design document, etc. are all artifacts and in that context they all have content and their effectiveness is assessable. But I don't understand at all what the aesthetic is explained in the post-question survey means. –  Jim Dec 24 '12 at 22:45
    
On a general note, since you immediately define the term, you can call it just plain performance, or just plain content, or indeed Susan. People who need to know what exactly that criterion encompasses will look up the definition anyway. (Likewise, people who don't care, don't care either way.) However, as @Jim says, the definition does need polishing. –  RegDwigнt Dec 24 '12 at 22:54
    
@Jim I imagine that the aesthetic means something like the governing description of the 'user experience' aimed at and of the visual and interactive means deployed to achieve that experience - what in my line of work is called the creative brief. See this. –  StoneyB Dec 24 '12 at 22:59
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2 Answers

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At a guess, this sounds like an evaluation/spec sheet template for a piece of software, or a check list for something like "these are all the things you need to consider when designing X" although the only reason I'm guessing that way is because it's sort of my domain (to the engineer with a hammer...).

If that's close, then in the context of 5.4.1 it's either best as User Experience which I think is the overarching concept here (heck, it's the internal definition within the paragraph), or it should be broken out into two headings.

Something like this:

5.4. User Experience This is about the target users' experience with the artefact. Evaluation should both examine overall user satisfaction along with the user's perception of the target design aesthetic.

5.4.1 Content This is about the content that the artefact provides and whether or not is it both appropriate and sufficient to the task

5.4.2 Operation This is about how well the content is delivered to a user, and whether or not the interface and workflow are appropriate to the task that the artefact is being designed for

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That is excellent Tanantish. Spot on. It is not meaningless jargon....it is evaluation of a software development. –  Irishgirl Dec 25 '12 at 16:13
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This is an excellent example of meaningless jargon. Even the best English speakers will be baffled as to what this means. If you work in a place which is asking you to provide this intangible good, then rest assured that no one else knows what it means. Now is your chance to seize for yourself a meaning for this thing. Whatever you do, tell your superiors that you are doing it in the name of content/performance, and that you are committed to excellence.

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You’re right about it being meaningless jargon, something that is universally despised. –  tchrist Dec 25 '12 at 1:52
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