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The closest I could get was xenophile. Also, optimistic would be a close second and I say that because I don't think that optimistic is a better description than xenophile because xenophile actually includes love.

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Do you have a context? –  simchona Dec 10 '12 at 3:07
    
@simchona: Context is unnecessary, I think. It won't change the answer. –  user21497 Dec 10 '12 at 3:10
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How about "tasteless"? :) –  terdon Dec 10 '12 at 3:10
    
@terdon: undiscriminating, imperceptive, insensitive, obtuse, & abnormal as well. :-) –  user21497 Dec 10 '12 at 5:38
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Would you define Buddha like that ? Insensitive ? Imperceptive ? Obtuse ? –  Stephane Rolland Dec 10 '12 at 11:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Omniphile: omni = every; -phile = love. Xeno- = foreign things, so xenophile means lover of foreign things, not lover of everything.

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"omnilove", could it be? –  xjaphx Dec 10 '12 at 4:42
    
@xjaphx: Omniphilia is the proper Latinate term, but that's a description of the type of indiscriminate love this type of person has, not of the person, which requires the suffix /-phile/. –  user21497 Dec 10 '12 at 5:40
    
You might want to note that omniphile is a neologism. –  coleopterist Dec 10 '12 at 6:43
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@coleopterist: Yes, it is, but it works according to the principles of English & Latin word-building. Anyone who understands Latin roots will understand omniphile. Fortunately, one doesn't have to be a Pollyanna to be an omniphile. I knew one of the latter when I was an undergraduate. Every morning she put on this happy face & wailed "Good morning, everyone!" Everyone hated her. Everybody else did too. Never a discouraging word & never a cloudy sky in her little world. Truly a cow in a manger. –  user21497 Dec 10 '12 at 7:07
    
"cow in a manger" - excellent phrase, and one I have never heard before. Thanks! –  Rory Alsop Dec 10 '12 at 12:53

Besides the already-offered neologism omniphile, consider Pollyanna:

One who is persistently cheerful and optimistic, even when given cause not to be so. [eg] You call her an optimist, but I call her an obnoxious Pollyanna.

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