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There is a newly used term, World English (WE). It is nobody's mother tongue. It is spoken across the world, for example, at check-in desks, airports, international trade fairs, world cup football seasons, etc.

I read an article about this topic and it says that native speakers are not privileged anymore and they can't really manage WE. Is this that hard for native speakers? What they speak is also English so they should not have problems, in my opinion; but I may be thinking wrong.

What about World English is difficult for native speakers of English to use or understand?

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closed as not constructive by tchrist, RegDwigнt Dec 8 '12 at 13:31

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We TEFL teachers call it International English. It's the world's lingua franca. Native speakers generally have no trouble understanding it because it's a simplified version of practical English, but they have lots of problems using it, unless they've got lots of experience speaking with non-native speakers. The reason they can't manage WE is that they're too used to speaking their own dialect. It's hard to speak clear, simple English when you're used to using all the garbage English (local jargon) your homeboys & homegirls jabber in. –  user21497 Dec 8 '12 at 10:50
    
Is the strange capitalization part of WE? –  Kris Dec 9 '12 at 5:54
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