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Does as or due to give same meaning? I have written some example case

As the reference data is available with a leading company and difficulty of making own reference data, the overall performance of the method is done collaboratively with that company.

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Due to the availability of reference data with a leading company and difficulty of making own reference data, the overall performance of the method is done collaboratively with that company.

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The answer is obviously No, because you haven't simply replaced one with the other. You can write similar sentences, as you have demonstrated. –  Andrew Leach Nov 29 '12 at 21:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"As" is often ambiguous. It means "while" or "because". "Due to" means "because of". The sentences you provide both mean the same thing, but they're verbose and clumsy.

If you need all that information in a single sentence, then perhaps one of these will work:

"We collaborate with ABC Ltd. when doing the XYZ procedure because they have all the reference data, which would be difficult and expensive for us to create."

or

"Because all the reference data, which would be difficult and expensive for us to create, is available at ABC Ltd., we collaborate with them when doing the XYZ procedure."

or

"Because all the reference data, which would be difficult and expensive for us to create, is available at ABC Ltd., when doing the XYZ procedure, we collaborate with them."

It might be better to use two sentences. For example:

"All the required reference data for the XYZ procedure would be difficult and expensive for us to create. Therefore, we collaborate with a company that has the data."

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As in this context is a graceful replacement for because.

Due to is also correct (if the clause is rewritten to be a phrasal noun), but it always sounds like jargon if the explanation is more than a few words. So,

Good:

The store was closed due to rain.

Bad:

Due to the availability of reference data with a leading company and difficulty of blah blah blah blah blah

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1  
"As" is an ambiguous & evil replacement for "because". There's nothing "graceful" about it. The only folks who think it's a reasonable thing to say are those whose idiolects contain the construct. Mine doesn't & never will. In "As she was was lying to me for the umpteenth time, I slapped her silly", does the "as" mean "because" or "while"? Nobody knows; maybe it doesn't matter.. "Due to" is another one of those evil & graceless replacements for "because of". Someone said recently that "because (of)" was too informal, but that's a purely subjective judgment, as are most usage judgments. –  user21497 Nov 29 '12 at 22:09

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