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I am struggling to find out what the best and shortest way is to describe the opposite of a legacy system (especially in software architecture, where legacy means the system used previously).

I need to use it in software so I can create methods such as:

find_legacy_record and find_[opposite of legacy]_record

I tried looking in a thesaurus for synonyms of old, but nothing really fit well with my use.

Legacy is a good term in programming, because you're less likely to confuse it to something else (old can also mean a previous state of the record, not necessarily belonging to an old system).

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I'd suggest that "legacy" is required when it is required, whereas nothing is required when it is not; you don't need an antonym. –  lotsoffreetime Nov 26 '12 at 20:19
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I'm not a programmer, so I guess I don't get it. It seems to me that the opposite of a legacy version of (a) software would be its current/latest/beta version. @Fumble Fingers might understand your query better. –  Autoresponder Nov 26 '12 at 20:53
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Maybe someone on Stack Overflow can make a better recommendation based on actual programming methodology. stackoverflow.com/questions –  Kristina Lopez Nov 26 '12 at 21:11
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@Autoresponder nailed it - legacy is the "old stuff", so the opposite is just current. –  FumbleFingers Nov 26 '12 at 21:48
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@Cristian: I can see why you might need a function called find_legacy_record(), but I don't think it makes much sense to call the "non-legacy" version anything other than find_record(). You'd just end up pointlessly adding "current" to every function name. –  FumbleFingers Nov 26 '12 at 21:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Legacy (adj.) means “inherited”.¹ Legacy systems, for example, are the systems we inherited. In the software industry, it often has a negative connotation that the thing is obsolete (but not always²). Regardless, an antonym would refer to recent innovations, so for that we would use terms such as:

  • cutting-edge systems
  • the latest systems
  • mainstream systems
  • modern systems
  • present-day systems
  • state-of-the-art systems
  • trendy systems³

Each of these has a unique shade of meaning and you would simply pick the one that is closest in meaning to what you intend.

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None of the alternatives fits the phrase find_[opposite of legacy]_record per OP's context. –  Kris Nov 27 '12 at 12:29
    
@Kris Understood, but if that limitation is added then the question becomes purely how to name the OP's variable and that is too localized. OP's stated question has the potential to be generally useful so I answered it with that in mind. –  MετάEd Nov 27 '12 at 13:50

Some possibilities are:

  • current
  • active
  • present
  • no additional word, just call it find_record
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Greenfield is a term that describes a software system that's starting out entirely new. Not an exact match, but I can't think of anything better.

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Interesting term. Didn't know about it. I think it's too abstract to use it here, but I'll keep it in mind –  Cristian Nov 28 '12 at 10:20

Antonym of Legacy is Provisional

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You may want to give more detail to this answer. What is a 'Provisional System'? How/when would Provisional apply to the circumstances the OP discusses? –  Doc Feb 6 at 15:14

The usual term used is conventional.

One example:

...achieving compatibility between current digital conventional systems and legacy analog system represents a challenge.

Comparisons of Conventional and Trunked Systems (pdf)

However, this term is used more frequently as an antonym of futuristic / innovative / out of the box, that is, with reference to the future than the past. Also, dictionaries generally do not define this term in the "today's contemporary" sense.

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The reason "conventional" is not found in dictionaries with a sense of "today's contemporary" is that it doesn't mean that. "Conventional" in your linked document is used in contradistinction not to "legacy" but to "trunked". Read the title, as well as the early sections which define "conventional", "trunked", and "hybrid", the three types of system being discussed. –  MετάEd Nov 27 '12 at 5:52
    
@MετάEd "Trunked" is the legacy system. QED. –  Kris Nov 27 '12 at 5:57
    
I'm sure the anonymous down voter is a gentleman. –  Kris Nov 27 '12 at 6:16
    
Actually, in your source "conventional" is the legacy architecture and "trunked" and "hybrid" are later, more modern developments. –  MετάEd Nov 27 '12 at 13:53

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