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I want to confirm what a book says. It says:

  1. I went to the station at 9 o'clock.
  2. I walked to the station at 9 o'clock.

Sentence (1) has the following two meaning:

a. I left for the station at 9 o'clock.

b. I got to the station at 9 o'clock.

Sentence (2), on the other hand, has only one meaning: I left for the station at 9 o'clock.

Do you agree with this description? If so, how do you express this situation in one sentence: I walked to the station, and I got to the station at 9 o'clock. "I got to the station walking at 9 o'clock"?

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closed as not constructive by Andrew Leach, RegDwigнt Nov 23 '12 at 16:36

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I would use the single sentence "I walked to the station, and I got to the station at 9 o'clock." –  Andrew Leach Nov 23 '12 at 16:34
2  
I think this is not constructive. There are lots of possibilities. "I walked to the station and got there at 9 o'clock"; "I walked to the station and arrived there at 9 o'clock"; "I arrived at the station by foot at 9 o'clock"; "I got to the station by foot at 9 o'clock"; "I went to the station by foot and was there at 9 o'clock"; I am running out of space already. –  RegDwigнt Nov 23 '12 at 16:35

1 Answer 1

Sentence #1 seems ambiguous because you can't tell if the writer left for or arrived at the station at 9 o'clock.

Sentence #2, to me, seems to imply the writer began walking to the station at 9 o'clock.

Sentence #1 could be restated as:

"I left for the station at 9 o'clock."

or

"I arrived at the station at 9 o'clock."

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Thank you very much. Unfortunately, this question seemed to be closed, but your answer is helpful. Thanks. –  foolnloof Nov 23 '12 at 17:17
1  
Sentence 2 is far from unambiguous though. If I left for the station at 8:45, and arrived at the station at 9:15, then I might say "I walked to the station at nine o'clock," meaning I had been walking at 9:00, and, by extension, during the minutes immediately before and after. P.S. (to the OP): Don't lament that your question was closed – study the reason it was closed. As @RegDwighт said, you've given sentences that have a wide array of possible interpretations depending on context, and that is the true answer to your question. If you mean to say you arrived at 9, then say you arrived at 9. –  J.R. Nov 23 '12 at 20:33

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