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I would like to use "nice to meet you" in an online email exchange but I feel that "meet" and "see" are not appropriate for online use. There is also a question about it.

I have also read somewhere that "know" is not appropriate, because meeting is not knowing and it should be used when I know someone for sometime.

I wish to ask what is appropriate to use? Is there anything to build with "connect"?

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6 Answers 6

While it does sound a little formal, you could "say":

It's nice to make your acquaintance.

I'm happy to make your acquaintance.

I'm delighted to make your acquaintance.

... and so on.

That said, I don't particularly see anything wrong with using meet. You are simply meeting online which is well-established terminology. The word hear is also used often.

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I liked Dancrumb's suggestion of "It was nice chatting/doing business with you". You can also substitute "a pleasure" for the tepid "nice".

Because these are all stock phrases and aren't meant to be taken literally, I don't see what's wrong with saying things like "meeting" or "talking". You both know what you did, so I don't think there's any problem in that context. It's when you talk about what you did to third parties that you need to be careful about what you say you did.

After all, when greeting old friends with something as innocuous as "How's it going?", you don't expect to hear anything more than "Fine, and how's by you?" You don't expect a rant or a jeremiad.

"It's nice to make your acquaintance" is also good, but it's quite formal. Sometimes, though, it's necessary to be formal. But you don't want to come across as the wrong kind of stiff and rigid.

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I would use : It is fun talking to you or It is fun chatting with you. The meaning is slightly different and more informal but it is exact replacement of the verbs. About connect- I havent heard phrase with it. Maybe it is better idea to use the type of the communication for that-It is nice having you as facebook, yahoo, google + friend etc.

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I'd recommend a replacement that's specific to the message in question and focuses on whatever's shared between you, in addition to the fact that you've just "met." After all, if you're corresponding, it's probably about something.

"Great to know that you're also located in the downtown area," or "I'm looking forward to trying your homebrew," for example.

These aren't limited to being about making the acquaintance, but that probably means that there's better communication going on.

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"Nice to e-meet you" is used often

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Never heard (or rather read) that before! Feeling old... ') –  medica Mar 3 at 15:28
1  
Can you supply some evidence in your answer? –  MετάEd Mar 3 at 16:18

emeet or e-meet Collins Dictionary

To meet someone for the first time over email or instant messenger.

Urban dictionary

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Hi! Could you please edit your post so that it links to the definition on Collins? Please see the formatting help, which will show you how to create links. While you're at it, it would also be helpful to quote a little bit of their definition that you think supports your answer. –  Bradd Szonye Apr 3 at 4:03
    
I've limited myself to adding the links and copying the definition provided by the first dictionary quoted by the poster. It would be great though if user70902 could add whether she is familiar with this expression and uses it herself. I've never heard of "e-meet" before, and I think it could catch on. –  Mari-Lou A Apr 3 at 6:22
    
Oops! @karen had given the same answer too, but without any references. This answer at least has two. –  Mari-Lou A Apr 3 at 6:52

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