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I want to say that something has happened due to several reasons. So I used word due to to say the reason but due to comes respectively. I avoided it in my 2nd sentence. Would it be ok?

Missing of object relationships can be found due to missing of a classified object, due to incomplete boundary estimation or due to an obstacle between two objects.

Missing of object relationship can be found due to: missing of a classified object, incomplete boundary estimation or obstacle between two objects.

this might be confused for others... other than content I am actually looking for the correct sentence pattern.

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yes you are right. but it is only one sentence of the whole text. so that others might misguide. –  gnp Nov 13 '12 at 22:57
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I'm going to say this is Not A Real Question. @niro - you have many more problems in this text besides the repetition of "due to". It's really just proof-reading, which could probably be better addressed in chat –  FumbleFingers Nov 13 '12 at 23:03
    
There is no need to avoid a single repetition of "due to". –  Mark Beadles Nov 14 '12 at 15:40
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closed as not a real question by FumbleFingers, Will Hunting, StoneyB, Mark Beadles, Daniel Nov 14 '12 at 16:14

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The sentence has some bigger problems than repetition of "due to", as FumbleFingers says. Here's how I think you should rewrite it:

Some object relationships are missing because a classified object is missing, a boundary estimation is incomplete, or an obstacle exists between two objects.

Another possibility is this:

Some object relationships are missing because there is a missing classified object, an incomplete boundary estimation, or an obstacle between two objects.

Another possibility is this:

Some object relationships are missing because a classified object is missing, a boundary estimation is incomplete, or an obstacle is between two objects.

Another possibility is this:

Some object relationships are missing because of a missing classified object, an incomplete boundary estimation, or an obstacle between two objects.

You can always substitute "because of" for "due to", or change the syntax slightly to eliminate the "of" in "because of".

You can also say something like this:

Some object relationships are missing for one (or more) of three reasons: a missing classified object, an incomplete boundary estimation, or an obstacle between two objects.

There are usually many ways to express an idea. The best way is surely the clearest, hopefully the briefest, and usually structurally parallel.

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many many thanks for the constructive way that you showed me. thanks –  gnp Nov 13 '12 at 23:23
    
Good one @Bill Franke. I wish more programmers remembered the perl computer language and Unix inspired saying "There's more than one way to do it" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There's_more_than_one_way_to_do_it Both in language and in much more restricted than perl computer languages, there's always opportunity to re-shape on a macro scale, instead of tinkering at the edges when things aren't right. –  Chris Nov 14 '12 at 0:09
    
@Chris Or as we say in the literary biz, "Don't patch it, pitch it." –  StoneyB Nov 14 '12 at 4:53
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