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What is "the hottest seat/seed in town"? I am not sure if it's a seed or seat or something else. I heard it a few times on "CNN" when a new upcoming "Larry King Live" program was being advertised. Also what does it mean "in town" here? It seems that it has nothing to do with a physical human settlement on some territory, but rather with some sphere or even some time period, I am not sure.

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A nitpick: searching on google "hottest seat" returns me 76100 results, while "hottest seed" just 884. It would have been safe to assume that the former was the correct one. –  Lohoris Jan 16 '11 at 15:22
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's a play on words.

  • The "hottest seat in town" can refer to a popular/hard-to-get ticket to an event such as a play or game (similar to "it's a hot ticket").

  • "Being in the hot seat" means

    a high-pressure situation in which a great deal of attention and scrutiny is focused on a person or organization
    per Wikipedia

So, the "hottest seat in town" is a popular place to be, but also a place where you're under scrutiny and being asked questions you must answer.

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It is seat, as reported in this article or this blog post.

It could design "a spot" (a place to be, here, one of the hottest to be, as in, "most exiting" or "more trendy").

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It's "The hottest seat" and refers to the seat the guest(s) sit on. Because Larry King was advertized as a tough interviewer. Which he arguably wasn't, but that's beside the point.

Given that Larry King fathered children pretty late in life, and his (current) wife is quite a bit younger than him, one could easily think of "the hottest seed", but I'll leave finding out what "seed" can mean to you (just google or wikipedia it). ;-)

The "in town"... interesting question, that one. It doesn't refer to "your town", it just makes it feel more personal, I'd say, by making it seem to happen "in your town", close to you, and "pulls you in" more. You the viewer, that is. It makes it feel like you're there, you're a part of it. Historically, it refered to the specific town/city something happene, as in "the hottest show/act in town", meaning this is the best show in this town (whatever "this town" is is obvious from context, like when you come to Las Vegas and someone hawks tickets for some show telling you, well, "it's the hottest show in town")

But here the effect of it is important (since of course it's taped in... where?), and it makes it feel like you're there. Or could be there

Or, on further pondering, it just adds a frame of reference. Just "The hottest seat" would sound weird, people would wonder "Where? Compared to what?".

I think. ;-)

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Thanks! That was really funny, I mean that part on the hottest seed :) –  brilliant Jan 16 '11 at 20:26
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